The Brief
A Blog about the LSAT, Law School and Beyond

We have unbundled LSAT PrepTests 63 (June 2011), 64 (October 2011), and 65 (December 2011) along with their HD video explanations from our LSAT Premium course.

You can purchase the 3 preptest pack here for $79.

We received demand from the June students who didn't want to purchase our entire course, but did want to learn from those three most recent preptests. Smart. The Last Minute PrepTest Pack gives you those three preptests for instant download and printing. More importantly, you get access to HD video explanations for each of the 100 questions in those tests. The video explanations walk you through every question in its entirety including the stimulus, the passage, the question stem, the right answers (and why they are right), and the wrong answers (and why they are wrong and why people might mistakenly think they are right). Each video is short and to the point. They are in HD and can be played back at faster (1.3x, 1.7x) speeds. If you are taking the test in June, you really should take PrepTests 63, 64 and 65 if you haven't yet. You still have time. If you have taken them already, this is the perfect set of video explanations to check your thinking against.

As with all our Logic Games explanations, the ones for these three preptests are already provided to you, free of charge, on our Logic Game Explanations page. Study hard!

Featured image: last minute preptest pack

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This is one of the logic games that students hate the most. It's the one about a music store that carries both new and used versions of jazz, opera, pop, rap, and soul CDs. It's from LSAT PrepTest 31, June 2000, Section 1, Questions 7-13, Logic Game 2.

I love this game. The reason is because I'm a sadist. But, that's obvious. What's not so obvious is that this game showcases how important it is to know your conditional logic well. I don't just mean knowing that "if" introduces a sufficient condition. That's child's play. What's hard about this game is knowing which conditional rules trigger and which ones are irrelevant. Most students react to the sheer volume of rules in this game with some form paralysis. Consider the video explanation below your antidote. Watch, learn and master when conditional rules trigger and when they are irrelevant.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: music store 3 credit loop_oh

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This is a foundational game to master for any LSAT taker. It's the birds in the forest game from LSAT PrepTest 33, December 2000, Section 4, Questions 6-12, Logic Game 2.

This is the first Logic Game we teach in our LSAT Course to introduce students to the Grouping Games. This one only has two groups - the "in the forest" group and the "not in the forest" group - and thus, we call it an In/Out Game. Let me repeat. You must master this game. Because this game is the acid test of whether you understand and can apply conditional logic.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: bird watcher credit dario sanches

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Like the birds in the forest game, this game is also essential. It's the fruit stand game from LSAT PrepTest 36, December 2001, Section 4, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1.

This game is an excellent test of your mastery of conditional logic. Watch, learn and practice until you know this game inside and out.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: fruit stand credit lendog64

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This is a difficult logic game. It's the one about a organizer of a reading club that will select French, Russian, novels, and plays. It's from LSAT PrepTest 32, October 2000, Section 3, Questions 7-11, Logic Game 2.

This game is an In/Out game, the foundational type of Grouping games. It's difficult because you cannot make very many inferences. In other words, there are a vast number of possible selections of the game items or "hypothetical worlds." So, the approach? Well, it's easier than it seems. Most people get stuck when they can't make an inference. For games like this one - by that I mean games where your set of rules/premises aren't enough for you to push out a lot of inferences - pretty much anything goes. You just have to check your hypothetical setups (your possible worlds) against the rules to make sure it doesn't contradict them. That's different from the simpler games, where the rules force you to infer a small number of hypothetical/possible worlds. Watch the video tutorial for this game here.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: books-attribution-zitona

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This is a difficult logic game. It's the one about the doctors Juarez, Kudrow, Longtree, Nance, Onawa, Palermo and which clinic, Souderton or Randsborough, they are assigned to. It's from LSAT PrepTest 34, June 2001, Section 4, Questions 19-24, Logic Game 4.

This game is difficult mostly because of its two hurdles. First is that you have to recognize this as an In/Out game, where the In/Out groups are disguised as Souderton/Randsborough. Second is that it has very interesting conditional rules that lead to a contradiction. If you get past these two hurdles, then you've gotten past most of the difficulty in this game and it becomes a straightforward In/Out game. Watch the video tutorial here.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: doctor-attribution-alex-proimos

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This is a difficult logic game. It's the one about a jeweler having to select six stone from rubies, sapphires, and topazes for six rings. It's from LSAT PrepTest 33, December 2000, Section 4, Questions 13-18, Logic Game 3.

This games is difficult because it is an In/Out game with sub-categories. A recurring inference that you have to remember while doing this and other games like this is that once a group is full, all the other items must go into the other group. That will help you solve this game. Watch the video tutorial here.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: gems-attribution-mauro-caleb

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This is the game about a bakery that makes deliveries of different loaves of bread: oatmeal, rye, and wheat which are sliced or unsliced. It's from LSAT PrepTest 30, December 1999, Section 1, Questions 1-5, Logic Game 1.

I say this game is difficult for two reasons. First, if you've never seen a game like this, you probably won't know how to set up the game board. It looks like a sequencing game, but actually, it's a grouping game. The second reason is that this game is very open. By that I mean the rules given are not very restrictive. They allow for a lot of possible acceptable worlds, possible acceptable hypothetical situations. That tends to paralyze students. In the video lesson below, I make mention of the "or translation rule."

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For more Logic Games video lessons like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: bread-attribution-robert-donovan

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1. Chin up. You've been studying for a long time. You're ready for this. As a bonus, you still have three weeks to improve even more.

2. Take 1 to 2 LSATs a week. These LSATs ought to be very recent ones (50's and higher). Take them under simulated testing conditions with our LSAT Proctor and Timer.

3. Use the Fool Proof Method for Logic Games and the Blind Review Method for Logical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension to review your simulated LSATs.

4. Sleep, a lot. Otherwise, you forget everything you learned.


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Okay, we've been working our asses off here trying to get LSAT prep materials up here for you in time for the June LSAT. Time is ticking down! So... three super exciting announcements! (or do they just sound super exciting to me because I haven't been getting enough sleep?)

LSAT Premium is ready to go!

LSAT Premium has all the great curriculum from LSAT Complete, and adds 10 very recent LSAT PrepTests (56 to 65).  And of course, 7Sage's signature explanation videos for every single question, that's 1000 more questions explained in our HD videos.

Logic Games Explanations for PrepTests 30-65 are all available

We put up the logic game explanations for PrepTests 46-65 earlier this week, and now they are all up.  That is over 140 logic games, all explained in HD.  What's the fee?  Zero dollars and zero cents.  Yeah, we are actually serious about our mission to liberate the LSAT :).

LSAT Free - The free trial version of LSAT Complete is available

Okay, so this is old news for some of you 7Sagers.  But in case you haven't heard, we opened up the first four days of our LSAT Complete course for everyone to try for free, no strings attached.  You can register and start using LSAT Free in less than 60 seconds.

(Photo credit: jurvetson - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jurvetson/)

Featured image: Turtle and strawberries 1280x960 (attribution jurvetson)

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