The Brief
A Blog about the LSAT, Law School and Beyond

2013-03-13 Update:
If you are enrolled in a full course you can use the Study Schedule Generator to make a study schedule customized to your needs.

Students often ask for LSAT study schedules, so we decided to release ours for free. It's based on problem sets and lessons from our online LSAT course.

This schedule is designed to be used 10 weeks before test day. This is the same schedule that our 7Sage Live! in person LSAT course uses. If you're studying with a bit more time or a bit less, don't worry. Just modify this schedule to go a bit faster or slower, and it will work just fine. There's considerable freedom with the 10 week schedule.  It's a guideline.  Many students skip around, focusing on just what they need to.  Others do everything in it and then some.  We want there to be flexibility with how you use this schedule so the curriculum is tailored to your needs specifically.  To that end, our private tutors are here to help you make those decisions.  Email J.Y. at jy@7sage.com to inquire more about private tutoring.

Start now with our 10 weeks day-by-day LSAT study schedule below!

Week 1

Monday, 9/24:
-Online Lectures at Home
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Introduction to Arguments." (1 hour 27 minutes)
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Main Point & Main Conclusion Questions." (1 hour 03 minutes)
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Grammar & Argument Part Questions." (1 hour 50 minutes)

-Online Lectures at Home
-Watch video explanations for questions from PrepTest 66 if you still don't understand after Blind ReviewTuesday, 9/25: 6pm-9pm
-Live! Class Meeting
-Complete Main Point & Main Conclusion Questions Problem Set 1 and check the answers.
-Complete Main Point & Main Conclusion Questions Problem Set 2 and check the answers.
-Complete Argument Part Questions Problem Set 1 and check the answers.

Wednesday, 9/26:
-Online Lectures at Home
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Most Strongly Supported Questions." (1 hour 11 minutes)
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Introduction to Logic." (3 hour 40 minutes)

Thursday, 9/27: 6pm-9pm
-Live! Class Meeting

-Complete Most Strongly Supported Questions Problem Set 1 and check the answers.
-Complete Most Strongly Supported Questions Problem Set 2 and check the answers.
-Complete Most Strongly Supported Questions Problem Set 3 and check the answers.

Friday, 9/28:
-Online Lectures at Home
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Assumptions & Weakening Questions." (2 hour 19 minutes)
-Watch all lessons in the Class "Strengthening Questions." (1 hour 15 minutes)

Saturday, 9/29: 10am-4pm
-Live! Class Meeting

-Complete Weaken Questions Problem Set 1 and check the answers.
-Complete Weaken Questions Problem Set 2 and check the answers.
-Complete Weaken Questions Problem Set 3 and check the answers.
-Complete Strengthen Questions Problem Set 1 and check the answers.
-Complete Strengthen Questions Problem Set 2 and check the answers.

Sunday, 9/30: Rest!  Continue reading

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9 comments

We are very excited to welcome the Public Interest Guest Speaker for this coming Saturday (9/29), Esha Bhandari!

Bio: Esha Bhandari is an Equal Justice Works Fellow at the ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project. She holds a B.A., First Class Honours, from McGill University, where she received the Allen Oliver Gold Medal in political science, and a J.D. from Columbia Law School, where she was a James Kent and Harlan Fiske Stone scholar and recipient of the Robert Noxon Toppan Prize in constitutional law and the Archie O. Dawson Prize for advocacy. During law school, Esha served as an Articles Editor for the Columbia Law Review, participated in the Human Rights Clinic, and completed an externship in the Legal Aid Society’s Immigration Law Unit. She spent a summer working on refugee rights matters at the Legal Resources Centre in Cape Town. Esha holds a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. Prior to joining the ACLU, Esha clerked for the Honorable Amalya L. Kearse of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Ask Esha your questions about public interest law:


If you’re curious about Esha’s experiences in law school or public interest law, please submit your questions (before this Saturday, September 29th) in the comments below.

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1 comment

We are very excited to welcome the Public Interest Guest Speaker for this coming Saturday (9/22), Alexis Offen!

Bio: Alexis Offen is the general counsel and senior policy advisor in the Mayor's Office of Operations, where she oversees strategy, policy and implementation for major Mayoral initiatives.  Alexis' projects have covered a range of issues, from how to spend the City's federal stimulus dollars to streamlining real estate development projects to finding new efficiencies and cost-savings in human resources and labor relations . Alexis also oversees all City rulemaking to ensure operational efficiency and customer service.  Prior to working in the Mayor's Office, Alexis worked as a real estate and government affairs attorney at Greenberg Traurig, an international law firm based in New York, and was the Deputy Policy Director for Andrew Cuomo's successful Attorney General Campaign in 2006.  Alexis attended Harvard College and Fordham Law School and now lives in Brooklyn with her husband and son.

Ask Alexis your questions about public interest law:

If you’re curious about Alexis' experiences in law school or public interest law, please submit your questions (before this Saturday, September 22nd) in the comments below.

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1 comment

Free LSAT Prep Materials

Free LSAT materials from the LSAC!

The LSAC, the makers of the LSAT, have provided a lot of good, free LSAT practice materials. But they're buried amidst a lot of dull administrative information, so I made a list of what you should read.

First, the LSAC provides general information about the LSAC. The best part about that page is the 19-minute video “About the LSAC”. I highly recommend it. It’s a great overview of the test, and it covers things that even many experienced students are unaware of.

Free Sample LSAT Explanations And Practice LSAT

Next, the LSAC provides sample questions for every section, along with explanations. These are a great orientation to the test, and it’s one of the few places where the LSAC provides *official* explanations for LSAT questions.

Lastly, the LSAC provides a full LSAT, for free. You can download and print the June 2007 LSAT. This was the first LSAT that used comparative reading. It’s a recent LSAT, and you should definitely take it before test day.

That’s about it. The sample questions I linked to can all be found on the LSAC’s prep materials page. Ignore the html versions of the sample questions and June 2007 test - they don't follow the regular format for LSAT questions.

There’s one more page you should read in full: Day Of The Test

It’s long, and a bit dull, but it’s extremely important. It tells you exactly what to bring and what not to bring on test day. Some highlights: No cellphones in the test center(!), only use wooden pencils, no rulers, no digital watches. Read the whole thing.

That covers it for free LSAT practice materials from the LSAC. If you want more good, free LSAT info, you can check out our logic games videos. They explain every logic game from recent LSATs. Have a look....they're free!


2 comments

We are very excited to welcome the Public Interest Guest Speaker for this coming Saturday (9/15), Marisa Cabrera!

Bio: Marisa Cabrera is a criminal defense attorney working as Appellate Counsel at the Center for Appellate Litigation. CAL is a not-for-profit law firm located in lower Manhattan, handling appeals and post-conviction proceedings on behalf of indigent criminal defendants in cases assigned by the Appellate Division, First Department. Marisa graduated with a B.A. in psychology in 2007 from Williams College in Williamstown, MA. In 2011, Marisa graduated cum laude from American University Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C. where she worked as a teaching assistant for a first-year legal writing course. Prior to working at CAL, Marisa worked as a law clerk for the Law Offices of Gary M. Gilbert & Associates, a plaintiff-side employment discrimination law firm, and as a judicial intern for Hon. Ariel Belen at the Appellate Division, Second Department. Additionally, while in law school, Marisa worked as a student attorney at the DC Law Students in Court civil litigation clinical program where she represented low-income tenants in DC landlord-tenant and small claims courts.

Ask Marisa your questions about public interest law:

If you’re curious about Marisa’s experiences in law school or public interest law, please submit your questions (before this Saturday, September 15th) in the comments below.

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4 comments

We are very excited to welcome the Public Interest Guest Speaker for this coming Saturday (9/8), Nicole Hallett!

Bio: Nicole Hallett is a staff attorney and former Skadden Fellow at Community Development Project (CDP). Her work at CDP supports worker centers and community groups organizing low-wage workers in New York City, particularly domestic workers. Before joining CDP, Nicole clerked for the Honorables Mark R. Kravitz (D.Conn.) and Rosemary S. Pooler (2d Cir.). She is a 2008 graduate of Yale Law School, where she received the C. LaRue Munson Prize for excellence in a law school clinical program. A Truman and Luce Scholar, Nicole received her master’s degree from the University of Oxford’s School of Development Studies and a B.A. summa cum laude from DePauw University.

Ask Nicole your questions about public interest law:

If you’re curious about Nicole’s experiences in law school or public interest law, please submit your questions (before this Saturday, September 8th) in the comments below.

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3 comments

We are very excited to welcome the Public Interest Guest Speaker for this coming Saturday (9/1), Natalie Orr!

Bio: Natalie Orr graduated from Columbia Law School in 2011 and is currently the Chadbourne & Parke fellow at The Door Legal Services, where she represents low-income young people in immigration matters. She has about 70 clients at a time, all aged 12-21, whom she helps
to obtain greencards and/or relief from removal through Special Immigrant Juvenile Status, Asylum, U visas, Prosecutorial Discretion, and now Deferred Action. After graduating from Harvard College in 2006 with a degree in History and Literature, Natalie spent two years as a paralegal at The Legal Aid Society’s Juvenile Rights Practice in the Bronx, where she assisted in both child abuse/neglect and juvenile delinquency litigation. During law school, she wrote for the Human Rights Law Review, served as an Articles Editor for the Jailhouse Lawyer’s Manual, and interned at the ACLU National Prison Project. She also participated in externships at the Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York. She spent her second summer at Simpson Thacher in New York.

Ask Natalie your questions about public interest law:

If you’re curious about Natalie's experiences in law school or public interest law, please submit your questions (before this Saturday, September 1st) in the comments below.

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2 comments

October 2011 LSAT (PrepTest 64) - Section 2 (Logic Games) - Game 1
This is a very easy basic sequencing game. It's the one about an administrator who's supposed to assign parking spaces to employees Robertson, Souza, Togowa, Vaughn, Xu, Young. It's from LSAT Prep Test 64, October 2011, Section 2, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1.

5s
5s
0.8x
1.0x
1.2x
1.4x
1.7x
2.0x
2.4x
3.0x

This is a great game for you to practice splitting your master game board up into a few sub-game boards. It also showcases why the LSAT rewards people who spend more time up front on setting up Logic Games and making inference before going into the questions. Watch out for the how they word before and after with a tricky use of "higher than."

Continue reading


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At 7Sage, we run an online LSAT video course. It's not like an in person class - Students love that they can watch lessons over and over again. With our course, you can stick with each concept until you master it.

One concern students have is about interactivity. With an in-person course, you can (sometimes) ask your instructor questions. People worry that if they sign up for our course, and don't understand, they have nowhere to turn.

But actually, our LSAT course is really interactive! Beneath each lesson, there are comment boards. You can post a question, and other students will answer it. You can answer other people's questions too. Teaching others is actually the best way to learn the LSAT.

We instructors monitor the boards too. So if no one answers the question, we jump in.

Requesting A Video Explanation

Sometimes, a comment isn't enough. If you need clarification on a tough question, you can post a request for a video. We'll make one just for you. Here's how.

Suppose you had a problem with Question 14, from PrepTest 33 (December 2000), Section 3. It's the second question in the "Argument Part Problem Set 1". This picture shows you how to get help, or you can read the guidelines below.

 How To Ask For Help With An LSAT Question

1.  Go to the Argument Part Questions Problem Set 1 Answers page in the course.

2. Post a comment along the lines of: "Request for video explanation for Question 14, from PrepTest 33 (December 2000), Section 3."

3. In the comment, say what you want explained.

4. Go make coffee, and come back to find an awesome video explanation! Well, not really - it'll take a day or so. But you should still go make a coffee - it's delicious!

Not signed up for one of our LSAT courses? They start at just $179. We could charge 3x as much, but we want to make LSAT education accessible for everyone.

How to ask LSAT questions


1 comment

We are very excited to welcome the Public Interest Guest Speaker for this coming Saturday (8/25), Komala Ramachandra!

Bio: Komala Ramachandra is an attorney at Accountability Counsel, a non-governmental organization that supports communities around the world affected by projects that negatively impact people's lives and environments. She graduated from Harvard Law School, cum laude, in 2010, where she received the Holmes Public Interest Fellowship to support her first year working with Accountability Counsel. During law school, Komala participated in International Human Rights clinical, and worked at Greater Boston Legal Services through the Immigration and Refugee Advocacy clinical program. She was active in Harvard Advocates for Human Rights, the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and the National Lawyers Guild. She has also interned with International Crisis Group in Nairobi, Kenya, researching land rights in post-conflict northern Uganda and with Paschim Banga Keth Mazoor Samiti, a grassroots farmers union in Calcutta, India, on issues of land security, eminent domain, and economic development.

Ask Komala your questions about public interest law:

If you’re curious about Komala’s experiences in law school or public interest law, please submit your questions (before this Saturday, August 25th) in the comments below.

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8 comments