Archive for the ‘Logic Games’ Category

cover-preptest-BI took PrepTest B (the February 1999 LSAT) under simulated testing conditions.  I want to share some of my thoughts with you.  This post will cover Logic Games for which I have already made the videos lessons (with links below).

**Spoiler Alert**

Stop reading if you haven't taken this prep test yet.  It'll ruin the test for you.

LSAT B Logic Game Summaries and Video Explanation Links

Game 1 - Eight boats arrive at a dock.  They are named Jewel, Kashmir, Neptune, Ojibwa, Pacific, Spain, Tornado, and Valhalla.

Game 2 - A park contains at most five of seven kinds of trees.  The trees are firs, laurels, maples, oaks, pines, spruces, and yews.

Game 3 - Four married couples dine at a circular table.  They are named Francisco, Gabrielle, Kyoko, Lee, Olivia, Peter, Raymond, and Simone.

Game 4 - Zeno's unfinished furniture sells five types of furniture.  Footstools, hutches, sideboards, tables, and vanities.  From the five, Irene will buy four.  Each piece Irene buys will be made from a kind of wood: maple, oak, pine, rosewood.

Game 1 - Eight boats arrive at a dock

This is a simple, easy sequencing game.  We've seen very similar reincarnations of this game before.  You should finish this in under 5 minutes if you want to get through all the games in this set.  Your proficiency with the basic sequencing chart will determine how quickly you can push through this game.

Game 2 - A park contains trees

This is a very difficult in/out game.  If you do not normally have enough time to finish all the games, this is the one you should skip.  The rules that make this game hard are the last two rules.  One of them has an embedded conditional.  Both of them demand that you represent them visually to fully understand how they control the pieces on the game board.  Once you do that, you can split the game into three sub-game boards to use up these two confusing rules.

Game 3 - Married couples dine at a circular table

This is a medium difficulty spatial game.  You can think of it as a circular sequencing game.  It's unusual because of the circular game board.  Aside from that, this game is not very difficult.  Hit the questions quick after a brief, simple game board setup.  For many of the questions, you'll have to draw sub-game boards that cater to them.

Game 4 - Zeno's sells furniture

This is a hardish in/out game with grouping within the in group.  Since there's only one item in the out group, you should split the game board up into two sub-game boards to accomodate the two possible items that could be out.  Once you do that, you can focus your attention of grouping the items within the in group.  In the in group, you have to figure out what wood goes with what type of furniture.  If you're not adept with conditional logic, there is a conditional rule that could potentially be confusing.

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For more Logic Games explanations like these, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we’ve recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it’s completely free.


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cover-preptest-68I just took PrepTest 68 (the December 2012 LSAT) under simulated testing conditions.  I want to share some of my thoughts with you.  This post will cover Logic Games for which I have already made the videos lessons (links below).

**Spoiler Alert**

Stop reading if you haven't taken this prep test yet.  It'll ruin the test for you.

LSAT 68 Logic Game Summaries and Video Explanation Links

Game 1 - A realtor is showing a prospective buyer seven houses.  The first and second houses are shown in the morning.  The third, fourth, and fifth are shown in the afternoon.  The fifth and sixth are shown in the evening.

Game 2 - Five witnesses are scheduled to testify at a hearing. The hearing is scheduled on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

Game 3 - A maintenance company is taking service requests.  Their clients are Image, Solide, and Truvest.  For each client, there are two service targets - one for website requests and one for voicemail requests.  The service targets are set for either 3 days, 2 days, or 1 day.

Game 4 - An editor will edit seven articles. Three articles cover finance, three cover nutrition and one covers wildlife.

Games 1 and 2

The first and second games are standard sequencing and grouping games where much of the board can be determined.  I made a few sub-game boards to better visually represent the placement of items on the game board.  Both games were solved in about 5 minutes each with no errors.

Game 3 - Maintenance Company

Since the first two games were quick, I expected the third and fourth games to be harder. The LSAT did not disappoint.  The third one was confusing.  I had to read the stimulus a couple of times to figure out how to set up the game board correctly.  The stimulus used a lot of referential phrasing ("clients" and "service targets") that made the it hard to follow.  The first rule took about 4 or 5 re-readings to sink in.  I thought pretty hard about what it meant for "website targets to be not longer than voicemail targets." As is almost always the case, the time invested up front was worth it.  I split up the game board into a few sub-game boards.  Even with the sub-game boards drawn out, I still had to redraw them next to most of the questions to avoid careless confusion.  This game took about 10 minutes with no errors.

Game 4 - Editor, Very Difficult

Going into the fourth game with about 15 minutes on the clock was comfortable.  Still, I wasn't fully prepared for how difficult it would end up being.  After setting up the game board and writing down the rules, I stared at the nearly blank page for a couple of seconds.  I was pretty sure there would be no point in trying to spilt the main game board up into sub-game boards.  The rules were so open that I couldn't make any inferences and so I didn't know where to start.  But with plenty of time left on the clock I just hit the questions hard and thought I would brute force my way through them.

That was risky.  Most of the questions required a separate game board setup for each answer choice.  That meant creating making up to 5 game boards for each question!  That felt paralyzing.  But you just do it.  By the time I got to the last 2 questions, I was down to 2 minutes.  Brute force is a highly time consuming strategy.  For the second to last question, after spending about  a minute on it, I eliminated the answers down to two.  I had a strong feeling about one of them and just chose it so I could move onto the last question.  I didn't prove it out.  I just moved onto the last question.  I got lucky and got it right.

With under a minute left for the last question, I looked at answers and guessed at which one of the five probably was right given what I knew about the dynamics of the rules.  Before I could even prove my only guess at the correct answer, time ran out so I had to bubble in my choice.  I got lucky again.

So, what's the take away?  Two of these four games were hard.  You have to be able to move through the easy ones very quickly to save up enough time to tackle the hard ones.

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For more Logic Games explanations like these, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we’ve recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it’s completely free.


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October 2011 LSAT (PrepTest 64) - Section 2 (Logic Games) - Game 1
This is a very easy basic sequencing game. It's the one about an administrator who's supposed to assign parking spaces to employees Robertson, Souza, Togowa, Vaughn, Xu, Young. It's from LSAT Prep Test 64, October 2011, Section 2, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1.

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This is a great game for you to practice splitting your master game board up into a few sub-game boards. It also showcases why the LSAT rewards people who spend more time up front on setting up Logic Games and making inference before going into the questions. Watch out for the how they word before and after with a tricky use of "higher than."

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Logic Games Explanations for the most recent LSAT PrepTest 66 from June 2012 is now available! Like all our other logic games explanations, these are available for free.

Game 1, Section 3, Questions 1-5 is about a chemistry class with six lab sessions over 3 days - Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday - in the morning and afternoon led by lab assistants Julio, Kevin, Lan, Nessa, Olivia, or Rebecca. Watch the video explanation below!

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Featured image: lsat 66

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This is one of the logic games that students hate the most. It's the one about a music store that carries both new and used versions of jazz, opera, pop, rap, and soul CDs. It's from LSAT PrepTest 31, June 2000, Section 1, Questions 7-13, Logic Game 2.

I love this game. The reason is because I'm a sadist. But, that's obvious. What's not so obvious is that this game showcases how important it is to know your conditional logic well. I don't just mean knowing that "if" introduces a sufficient condition. That's child's play. What's hard about this game is knowing which conditional rules trigger and which ones are irrelevant. Most students react to the sheer volume of rules in this game with some form paralysis. Consider the video explanation below your antidote. Watch, learn and master when conditional rules trigger and when they are irrelevant.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: music store 3 credit loop_oh

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This is a foundational game to master for any LSAT taker. It's the birds in the forest game from LSAT PrepTest 33, December 2000, Section 4, Questions 6-12, Logic Game 2.

This is the first Logic Game we teach in our LSAT Course to introduce students to the Grouping Games. This one only has two groups - the "in the forest" group and the "not in the forest" group - and thus, we call it an In/Out Game. Let me repeat. You must master this game. Because this game is the acid test of whether you understand and can apply conditional logic.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: bird watcher credit dario sanches

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Like the birds in the forest game, this game is also essential. It's the fruit stand game from LSAT PrepTest 36, December 2001, Section 4, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1.

This game is an excellent test of your mastery of conditional logic. Watch, learn and practice until you know this game inside and out.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: fruit stand credit lendog64

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This is a difficult logic game. It's the one about a organizer of a reading club that will select French, Russian, novels, and plays. It's from LSAT PrepTest 32, October 2000, Section 3, Questions 7-11, Logic Game 2.

This game is an In/Out game, the foundational type of Grouping games. It's difficult because you cannot make very many inferences. In other words, there are a vast number of possible selections of the game items or "hypothetical worlds." So, the approach? Well, it's easier than it seems. Most people get stuck when they can't make an inference. For games like this one - by that I mean games where your set of rules/premises aren't enough for you to push out a lot of inferences - pretty much anything goes. You just have to check your hypothetical setups (your possible worlds) against the rules to make sure it doesn't contradict them. That's different from the simpler games, where the rules force you to infer a small number of hypothetical/possible worlds. Watch the video tutorial for this game here.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: books-attribution-zitona

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This is a difficult logic game. It's the one about the doctors Juarez, Kudrow, Longtree, Nance, Onawa, Palermo and which clinic, Souderton or Randsborough, they are assigned to. It's from LSAT PrepTest 34, June 2001, Section 4, Questions 19-24, Logic Game 4.

This game is difficult mostly because of its two hurdles. First is that you have to recognize this as an In/Out game, where the In/Out groups are disguised as Souderton/Randsborough. Second is that it has very interesting conditional rules that lead to a contradiction. If you get past these two hurdles, then you've gotten past most of the difficulty in this game and it becomes a straightforward In/Out game. Watch the video tutorial here.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: doctor-attribution-alex-proimos

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