Archive for the ‘Logic Games’ Category

This is a difficult logic game. It's the one about a jeweler having to select six stone from rubies, sapphires, and topazes for six rings. It's from LSAT PrepTest 33, December 2000, Section 4, Questions 13-18, Logic Game 3.

This games is difficult because it is an In/Out game with sub-categories. A recurring inference that you have to remember while doing this and other games like this is that once a group is full, all the other items must go into the other group. That will help you solve this game. Watch the video tutorial here.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

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This is the game about a bakery that makes deliveries of different loaves of bread: oatmeal, rye, and wheat which are sliced or unsliced. It's from LSAT PrepTest 30, December 1999, Section 1, Questions 1-5, Logic Game 1.

I say this game is difficult for two reasons. First, if you've never seen a game like this, you probably won't know how to set up the game board. It looks like a sequencing game, but actually, it's a grouping game. The second reason is that this game is very open. By that I mean the rules given are not very restrictive. They allow for a lot of possible acceptable worlds, possible acceptable hypothetical situations. That tends to paralyze students. In the video lesson below, I make mention of the "or translation rule."

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For more Logic Games video lessons like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: bread-attribution-robert-donovan

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BAM! Logic game explanations organized all neat-like, right here. No more sloughing through YouTube to hunt down each one. It's like shooting fish in a barrel. Come and frolic amidst them!

You will find video explanations for every logic game from every LSAT test administration going back over a decade. From LSAT PrepTests 29-65 (October 1999-December 2011), that's explanations for over 140 logic games! Why are these available for free? Because we love you. But, our love doesn't trump copyright laws... yet. So, we are unable to display the actual LSAT questions these lessons explain. To get those, you'll have to sign up for our online course.

Make sure you also use the Fool Proof Method to improve your logic games score!

Featured image: Woman with free papers (attribution Casey David)

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This is an essential logic game because it tests the fundamentals of conditional logic. You have to be able to solve this game with complete mastery if you want to do well on the LSAT. This game is about an album which contains photographs picturing seven friends: Raimundo, Selma, Ty, Umiko, Wendy, Yakira, Zack who appear either alone or in groups with one another. It's from LSAT PrepTest 45, December 2004, Section 3, Questions 13-17, Logic Game 3.

Watch the video lesson below and learn the essential skills you'll need to tackle other logic games on the LSAT.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: photo-album-cat-attribution-flossyflotsam

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This is a simple sequencing game about Garibaldi meeting with foreign dignitaries Fuentes, Matsuba, Rhee, Soleimani and Tbahi. It's from LSAT PrepTest 44, October 2004, Section 3, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1.

If you want to do well on the Logic Games section of the LSAT, this game should be completed in about 5 minutes. Watch the video lesson below to see how to setup and solve this game quickly.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: starbucks-attribution-roberto-ventre

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This logic game is about a tour group that visits five archaeological sites discovered by Ferrara, Gallagher, or Oliphant in the eighth, ninth, or tenth century. It's from LSAT PrepTest 44, October 2004, Section 3, Questions 13-17, Logic Game 3.

This game is difficult because you're being baited to confuse sufficient and necessary conditions. If you know your conditional logic well, if you can run contrapositives in your sleep, then this game is rewarding. Otherwise, this game is rough. There is also a tricky rule/premise in there that tests whether you know what "recent" means. Watch the lesson below and learn how to solve this game quickly.

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For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: archaeological-site-attribution-nikon-nic

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