Archive for the ‘Online Course’ Category

We want to make it easy for you to find all of our free LSAT conditional logic related resources. As we add new content, we'll add it to this list. If you're looking for something in particular and don't see it here, comment on this post and we'll add it to the queue!

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This mind map shows the contents of the Arguments section of our top-rated LSAT course's Core Curriculum. Does your LSAT prep course cover this?

For a printable PDF version of the mind map, click here: Arguments Mindmap

Arguments_Mindmap
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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

LSAT Conditional Logic GROUP 2 is made up of the following terms:

  • Only
  • Only if
  • Only when
  • Only where
  • Always
  • Requires
  • Must

All the words in this group follow this translation rule:

The ideas introduced by (i.e., immediately following) these words are the necessary conditions.

Let’s try it:
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This mind map shows the contents of the Grammar section of our top-rated LSAT course's Core Curriculum. Does your LSAT prep course cover this?

For a color version of the mind maps, click here.

For a black-and-white version (which may be more suitable for some printers), please click here.

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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Thomas Edison said that genius is "1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration." Rene Descartes said "You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing." Lucretius, the Roman philosopher, said "Constant dripping hollows out a stone." The point is that hard work counts a lot. Especially when it comes to the LSAT. Yes, how well you do on the LSAT does depend on your raw intellect too, but do not discount how large a role your work ethics will play.

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Here is a list of all of the LSAT questions for which there are two correct answer choices:

  • [empty]

When it comes to LSAT correct answer choices: There can be only one!

I tend to always hear from typically new students, disgruntled at having gotten a question wrong, “Hey, I totally understand why C is right, but I’m sure B is also right. Here, look at my proof.”

Since, you’re just starting down this long road, I want unburden you from this misconception. It makes for lighter travel. Plus, I don’t want to yell at you later.

So, drop this misconception on the ground, dig a fire pit, burn it, and bury the ashes. There is never another answer choice that is even arguably right for any LSAT question. Don’t even think about it.

I’ll say it again. There is only ever one right answer choice and four massively, horrendously, embarrassingly, wrong answer choices.

This is not to say that it’s easy to identify the right answer choice. Quite the opposite, it’s very difficult. Often, I have a difficult time figuring out why an answer is right or wrong. But, I never think it’s because the LSAC messed up. Rather, it is invariably true that I just haven’t figured it out yet.

Why am I so certain of this? For a couple of reasons. First, I’ve done or taught every LSAT question in existence (over 7,000) and I have never run across a wrong answer choice that I thought was even arguably right. Second, I’ve discussed this issue at length with other LSAT instructors and high scoring students and we’ve always independently come to the same conclusion. Third, and this is the important one, LSAC’s policy in dealing with possible mistakes in their questions guarantees this result.

Of the four LSATs administered each year, the June, October, and December LSATs are disclosed to the test takers. You receive a PDF of the test and you have 90 days to challenge any question you want.

Just think about that for a second. Think about the importance of your LSAT score. The difference even a few points make. Think about the level of neuroses that pervades LSAT takers. When you get your score back and you see that you got some questions wrong and the LSAC is telling you that you have the option to challenge every one of those questions and that’s your only chance of getting a higher score, what do you think you’re going to do? Of course you’re going to scrutinize the shit out of every single question.

Except it’s not just you doing this. It’s everyone who took that LSAT. That’s the insane level of scrutiny that every LSAT question is subject to.

It doesn’t even end there. Say you sincerely believe that the LSAT has made a mistake. You write in your challenge. The LSAC will answer every challenge in writing showing you why the right answer is right and the wrong ones wrong and why your argument fails miserably.

But, say you get their response back and you’re still not satisfied. Then, you get to appeal this issue to a panel of independent outside experts. This means that the LSAC writers must ultimately write their questions with reasoning solid enough to persuade a entire fucking panel of independent outside experts that there is only one right answer choice and four wrong answer choices. If a wrong answer choice was even arguably right, they would be unable to meet this standard.

Now, of course, this doesn’t mean the LSAC never makes mistakes. Even the LSAT writers are human after all and even though the system they designed is solid, any human system is subject to error. Every once in a while a written challenge does reveal an error. When that happens, the question is removed from scoring and removed from the published Prep Test. By the time you are taking that Prep Test, it’s already been through hellish scrutiny. You’re not going to find anything new that tens of thousands of people just like you only with way more riding on the line haven’t found before.

So remember. There is only one right answer choice.


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Are you getting ready to take the upcoming June LSAT?  Enter to win of two free LSAT Complete courses!  This contest is open to everyone.

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This contest ends at 11pm ET, March 8th.

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Follow the steps, spread the word, and rack up tons of extra entries to boost your chances at the draw prize, and to shoot for the prize for the most entries.

2013-03-10 Update:

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At 7Sage, we run an online LSAT video course. It's not like an in person class - Students love that they can watch lessons over and over again. With our course, you can stick with each concept until you master it.

One concern students have is about interactivity. With an in-person course, you can (sometimes) ask your instructor questions. People worry that if they sign up for our course, and don't understand, they have nowhere to turn.

But actually, our LSAT course is really interactive! Beneath each lesson, there are comment boards. You can post a question, and other students will answer it. You can answer other people's questions too. Teaching others is actually the best way to learn the LSAT.

We instructors monitor the boards too. So if no one answers the question, we jump in.

Requesting A Video Explanation

Sometimes, a comment isn't enough. If you need clarification on a tough question, you can post a request for a video. We'll make one just for you. Here's how.

Suppose you had a problem with Question 14, from PrepTest 33 (December 2000), Section 3. It's the second question in the "Argument Part Problem Set 1". This picture shows you how to get help, or you can read the guidelines below.

 How To Ask For Help With An LSAT Question

1.  Go to the Argument Part Questions Problem Set 1 Answers page in the course.

2. Post a comment along the lines of: "Request for video explanation for Question 14, from PrepTest 33 (December 2000), Section 3."

3. In the comment, say what you want explained.

4. Go make coffee, and come back to find an awesome video explanation! Well, not really - it'll take a day or so. But you should still go make a coffee - it's delicious!

Not signed up for one of our LSAT courses? They start at just $179. We could charge 3x as much, but we want to make LSAT education accessible for everyone.

How to ask LSAT questions


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Two weeks ago, we released Sequencing Games with a Twist problem sets as a part of our online course to help students better hone in those LSAT skills. Today, we're happy to announce that every student enrolled in our LSAT Complete and LSAT Premium online courses now has access to the complete set of logic games problems. We sorted them according to the game types: Sequencing Games, Spatial Sequencing Games, Sequencing Games w/a Twist, In/Out Games, In/Out Games w/Sub-Categories, Grouping Games, Grouping Games w/a Chart, In/Outs w/Sequencing Game.

We limited ourselves to pulling these games from LSAT PrepTests 1-35. We don’t want to ruin the newer LSATs for you. Our online course makes you take timed LSAT PrepTests over and over again because that’s the only way to improve your score. As a part of the course, LSAT PrepTests from 36-65 are saved for you to download, print, take as timed LSATs, and review. Also as a part of the course, we have videos lessons that explaining each question from LSAT PrepTests 36-65.


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[Update July 1]: We are pleased to announce the winner of our give away: Congratulations Maggie H! We have a runner up prize for everyone who entered: A coupon for 10% off the price of LSAT Premium and LSAT Complete, which was emailed to everyone who entered. Thank you all for your participation! [End of update.]

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Photo credit: Newsbie Pix (http://www.flickr.com/photos/newsbiepix/3832702141)

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