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December 2012 LSAT Registration Deadline

The most interesting LSAT student in the world wants you to register for the December LSAT

The registration deadline for the December 2012 LSAT is October 29th. That's this Monday. Don't forget to register.

If you're on the fence about a retake, don't wait to get your scores. Register now. If you don't need to retake, you can get a partial refund. This is important, it's worth losing a small fee to be sure you're registered. The refund deadline is November 9th, 2012.

There is a late registration deadline on November 9th, but it's more expensive and there's no guarantee you'll get a seat.

The December 2012 test date is Saturday, December 1st.

Have you ever missed a registration deadline? Let us know in the comments!

p.s. I actually missed an LSAT registration deadline myself once :(


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LSAT score conversions can seem intimidating at first. You have no idea what a raw score or scaled score means. Fortunately, it's not that tough. Soon you'll know exactly how to find out your score.

Each LSAT has about 100 or 101 questions. You get one point for getting a question right, and there is no penalty for guessing.

Your "raw score" is just the total number of questions you get right.

Converting Raw Scores To LSAT Scaled Scores

Your scaled score is a mark out of 180, and it's the one that counts. Law schools use this to compare you against students who wrote different LSATs.

Each LSAT has it's own formula for converting raw scores to scaled scores. You can find it at the back of the test.

Take your raw score, and look at the chart. There will be two columns: highest and lowest. These show the highest and lowest raw scores that let you get a certain scaled score.

If this sounds complicated, don't worry: Just find your number in one of the columns, then read the scaled score that's in the same row. That's your score.

Example: Finding a Scaled Score For The June 2007 LSAT

I'll give you an example using the June 2007 LSAT. Let's pretend you got the following scores:

  • Logic Games: 14/23
  • Logical Reasoning I: 18/25
  • Logical Reasoning II: 20/25
  • Reading Comprehension: 19/27

Add them up: 14 + 18 + 20 + 19 = 71

Then look at page 38, which has the scoring scale. You can see 71 in the "lowest" column. It's the lowest score you could get to get a 156 (not bad for a first score!). A raw score of 72 would also have gotten a 156. That's the "highest" raw score that qualified.

Believe it or not, you now know everything there is to know about calculating your LSAT score.

You're probably wondering what your score means, and what an LSAT percentile is. Stay tuned, that's a topic for an upcoming post!

For more detailed explanation of LSAT score conversion, check out this post.

Click here to use our LSAT score calculator to figure out your raw and scaled score.

 

Featured image: dome credit seier+seier

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We want to help you study for the December LSAT. So, we're giving away a a pair of free LSAT courses. The contest is open until Midnight, October 19th.

Grand Prize: LSAT Premium course - $349 value

Runner-Up Prize: LSAT Complete Course - $179 value

These courses will teach you everything you need to get a good score in December.

lsat contest

You get one entry just for signing up. But you can increase your chance to win by sharing....you like sharing, right? For every friend you get to enter, you get ten additional entries.

You can share via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin or URL once you sign up.

Good luck in December! You can enter the contest here.

 

Featured image: Giveaway (attribution Newsbie Pix)

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The video is an excerpt from our online LSAT course. If you like the video, you'll like the course. If you want to give it a test run first, you can sign up for our free trial.

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Reading Comprehension might feel impossible to improve at. Either you read well, or you don't, right?

While a lot of students find it tough to get better at LSAT Reading Comprehension, don't let that stop you. There are ways to get better at RC.

The video above gives you an Introduction To Reading Comprehension. For more RC tips, check out the Memory Method for Reading Comprehension.

Material Covered In The Video

Active reading

  • New, unfamiliar, boring subject matter and vocabulary
    • Familiarity with subject matter matters
    • Be well read
  • Focus, Focus, Focus!
  • Ask questions
  • Piece information together as you read
  • Use your imagination
  • Anticipate the direction of the passage

How they lose you

  • You fall asleep
  • Referential phrasing
  • Modifiers/embedded clauses
  • Push back/connect the dots

Things they care about

  • Main point/conclusion
    • Factually accurate?
    • Correct emphasis?
  • Author’s attitude or tone
  • Facts, details
    • Can you clearly recall the facts with accuracy?
    • Can you push out inferences from these facts and details?
  • Passage structure
    • Relationship between the paragraphs
      • The flow of concepts/ideas
  • Different arguments, different view points
    • Clearly distinguish

Miscellany

  • So many words!
  • Humanities, Law, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences
  • Last passage packed w/questions – 7 or 8
  • Practice skipping questions for time
  • Focus spending time upfront on the passage
    • Wrong answers are time sinks

The video was an excerpt from our online LSAT course. If you liked the video, you'll like the course. If you want to give it a test run first, you can sign up for our free trial.


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