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Most people take practice LSATs wrong.  I see it all the time, and it sucks because it comes back to bite them in the ass on test day.  I don't want that to happen to you!

The key to practicing LSATs is to simulate the real testing environment as closely as possible.  That way, test day is just like another practice test.  How do you do this?

First, gear up with exactly what you are allowed to use on test date:

  • LSAT printed on paper.  Never take an LSAT displayed from a screen of any kind.

  • No. 2 pencil, eraser and sharpener.  Never use a mechanical pencil, pen, marker etc.

  • Analog wristwatch.  Never use a digital timer - you need to get used to your watch.  If you don't have one yet, use the one in our LSAT Proctor App until you get one.

Secondly, set the mood with the right test environment

  • Find your test location and practice in a similar place.  If you can, practice in the actual test location.

  • You will test in the early morning (unless you are taking the June LSAT, when it is in the early afternoon).  Take your tests at that time.

 

Lastly, listen to the real test instructions with appropriate background noises.

  • This is easy - just download the free LSAT Proctor App in less than 30 seconds (Android app is coming soon)

  • Use the app when you practice.  The app includes real proctoring instructions, realistic background sounds and a virtual analog watch.

That's it!  Now that you know how to take LSATs the *right* way, get the app and take an LSAT Prep Test right now.


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You already know that taking real LSATs is vital to improving your score.  But properly reviewing the tests you take will really take your score to the next level.

First, let's look at how most people review. They take a timed test or section. When they finish, they flip to the answer key and rush to correct their work. "Yes, I'm right - I'm awesome!", or "Argh, I'm wrong - I suck!".

You probably review this way - I did when I started out. Heck, there were times when I flipped to the answers mid test. I just couldn't wait to check.

Unfortunately, this is an AWFUL way to review. Think about it - you don't really care if you were right. This isn't test day, so your points don't count. Some answers might just have been lucky guesses.

You really care whether your reasoning was right. And it's hard to check your reasoning if you check the answers first. Once you see that the answer is D, you'll invent reasons why D is obviously correct. I see students make up wrong reasons for right answers all the time.

The trick is to review questions before you check your answers. We call this Blind Review, and it's the best way to study. For details on how to do it, check out this video we made explaining how do Blind Review.

Featured image: LSAT Trick (attribution kennymatic)

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Underestimating your enemy is the biggest mistake you can make in a fight and nearly everyone underestimates how difficult the LSAT is.

Let’s avoid that blunder right now. The LSAT is hard. Really f*ng hard. Law school is even harder. If you already knew this, then you’re in better shape than the vast majority of prospective law students. High five! If you didn’t get a high five but want a high five, just reread this paragraph until you get one.

I will often remind you that this test is hard. This is simply to remind you that you need to study to do well. If the idea of taking a hard test that you need study for is very scary for you, you may want to rethink going to law school.

One last time: The LSAT is hard. Understood? Good, you just avoided the biggest mistake that LSAT newbies make.

And, you also happen to be half way done with your first LSAT lesson! ​Get a Free Account and finish the rest of it in less than one minute and be on your way to defeating the LSAT.

Featured image: LSAT Number 1 Mistake Double Facepalm (attribution darkuncle)

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Are you wondering about how our course compares against the competition’s?

You already know that we’re way more affordable than the other courses that cost thousands of dollars but let’s be honest: you care more about how effective our course is.

Don’t just wonder about it. Read what our students have said. Check out our course reviews.

We have over 50 unfiltered and unbiased reviews of the course by current and past students, many of whom have used other LSAT prep courses. They leave insightful detailed reviews of exactly how they think we compare to other LSAT courses.

Stop wondering who’s got a better LSAT course and take a look right now: http://7sage.com/lsat-course-reviews/

Featured image: LSAT Reviews (attribution Nomadic Lass)

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Did you know that 7Sage is a balls to the wall online LSAT prep system that is more exciting than watching a bear fight a robot shark?

Well, maybe not.

But it will help you get the highest LSAT score possible. And a high LSAT score is the single most important factor to getting into a great law school and raking in scholarships. By signing up for a 7Sage account, you’re making a smart investment in your future.

Here are just five of the great LSAT tools that you'll get with a free 7Sage account:

  • Logic game explanations in HD video for every single LSAT logic game. Ever.

  • Discussion forum where you can connect with over 1,000 other LSAT students.  Share, learn, laugh, cry, and celebrate with our wonderful community of students and teachers.

  • A preview of the best LSAT courses in all the universes, obviously

  • iPhone app to perfectly proctor your LSAT Prep Tests.  Android app is coming soon too.

  • LSAT Grader to track every LSAT you take.  Analyze your performance, learn your strengths and weaknesses, and target your focus for maximal efficiency.

Register now and get started in less than 15 seconds.

Featured image: Free LSAT Tools - attribution: Rupert Ganzer)

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Are you getting ready to take the upcoming October/December LSAT?  Enter to win one of two free LSAT Complete Courses or Upgrades!  This contest is open to everyone including current 7Sagers.

If you're already enrolled in a course and win, you get a free upgrade to the next higher course. If you already have LSAT Ultimate, then you win the coveted Mystery Prize.

There are two ways to win. There is one prize awarded by random draw, and one prize awarded for collecting the most entries.

This contest ends at 11pm ET, August 24th.

Pro-tip: You can get unlimited entries! You get +18 entries for following the simple steps, +1 entry for every person that clicks on one of your links, and +5 (!) entries for everyone who enters the contest using your custom link.

Follow the steps, spread the word, and rack up tons of extra entries to boost your chances at the draw prize, and to shoot for the prize for the most entries.

(contest ended)

Update: We're happy to announce that Ryan S. and Denise L. won free courses in this giveaway - congratulations!

Featured image: Giveaway (attribution Newsbie Pix)

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The waiting is finally over.

We just received word that the June 2013 LSAT exam scores are being released today!

The release happens in batches.

Share, celebrate, commiserate, on this June LSAT Score discussion thread.

Featured image: June LSAT Scores Released (attribution Martin Fisch)

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LSAT Books

LSAT books can help you study

Our LSAT Courses are all you need to study for the LSAT.  But if you don't have access to the Internet (how did you get here??) or just prefer the smell of books, here are our top picks.

The most important books are the official LSATs from the LSAC. We sell many tests with video explanations, but you can find even more past LSATs on amazon.

Some of these tests are quite old. You should use them if you have a decent amount of time to study. If you have less than a month, stick to the more recent tests.

Best LSAT Books

Ten New, Actual, Official LSATs (LSATs 52-61): The most important book from the list. This book is only $19.50, and has ten of the most recent LSATs. You can't get them cheaper anywhere.

The Next Ten Actual Official LSATs (LSATs 29-38): These tests are older, but still quite useful, especially if you have a few months to study. These tests are also quite cheap.

Hacking The LSAT: Explanations For LSATs 29-38: These are full explanations for every question in The Next Ten LSATs. Written by our VP of Curriculum, they're a great resource to figure out exactly why an answer is right or wrong.

LSAT Superprep: This is LSAC's guide to the LSAT. It comes with strategies for each section; the Reading Comprehension guide is short but good. It also has three tests you won't find anywhere else. The best part is that these tests come with full explanations by the LSAC.

They are the ONLY official explanations from the LSAC for any test, so it's useful to see what they're looking for in answer choices. The questions also have difficulty ratings.

Ten More Actual Official LSATs (LSATs 19-28): The LSATs in this book are fairly old. In particular, the logic games are different from those on the  modern LSAT. But these are still useful tests, especially if you think you'll use up all the modern LSATs.

Ten Actual Official LSATs: Old tests from the early 90s. You should be aware this book exists, but only use this if you've got a lot of time to study and will run through all the other tests.

Note: All the official LSAT books come with bubble sheets to mark your answers. You should definitely use these to get the most authentic test experience. Otherwise you're giving yourself extra time.

If you need more bubble sheets, or a timed LSAT proctor, check out our LSAT tools page and our LSAT App


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cover-preptest-BI took PrepTest B (the February 1999 LSAT) under simulated testing conditions.  I want to share some of my thoughts with you.  This post will cover Logic Games for which I have already made the videos lessons (with links below).

**Spoiler Alert**

Stop reading if you haven't taken this prep test yet.  It'll ruin the test for you.

LSAT B Logic Game Summaries and Video Explanation Links

Game 1 - Eight boats arrive at a dock.  They are named Jewel, Kashmir, Neptune, Ojibwa, Pacific, Spain, Tornado, and Valhalla.

Game 2 - A park contains at most five of seven kinds of trees.  The trees are firs, laurels, maples, oaks, pines, spruces, and yews.

Game 3 - Four married couples dine at a circular table.  They are named Francisco, Gabrielle, Kyoko, Lee, Olivia, Peter, Raymond, and Simone.

Game 4 - Zeno's unfinished furniture sells five types of furniture.  Footstools, hutches, sideboards, tables, and vanities.  From the five, Irene will buy four.  Each piece Irene buys will be made from a kind of wood: maple, oak, pine, rosewood.

Game 1 - Eight boats arrive at a dock

This is a simple, easy sequencing game.  We've seen very similar reincarnations of this game before.  You should finish this in under 5 minutes if you want to get through all the games in this set.  Your proficiency with the basic sequencing chart will determine how quickly you can push through this game.

Game 2 - A park contains trees

This is a very difficult in/out game.  If you do not normally have enough time to finish all the games, this is the one you should skip.  The rules that make this game hard are the last two rules.  One of them has an embedded conditional.  Both of them demand that you represent them visually to fully understand how they control the pieces on the game board.  Once you do that, you can split the game into three sub-game boards to use up these two confusing rules.

Game 3 - Married couples dine at a circular table

This is a medium difficulty spatial game.  You can think of it as a circular sequencing game.  It's unusual because of the circular game board.  Aside from that, this game is not very difficult.  Hit the questions quick after a brief, simple game board setup.  For many of the questions, you'll have to draw sub-game boards that cater to them.

Game 4 - Zeno's sells furniture

This is a hardish in/out game with grouping within the in group.  Since there's only one item in the out group, you should split the game board up into two sub-game boards to accomodate the two possible items that could be out.  Once you do that, you can focus your attention of grouping the items within the in group.  In the in group, you have to figure out what wood goes with what type of furniture.  If you're not adept with conditional logic, there is a conditional rule that could potentially be confusing.

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For more Logic Games explanations like these, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we’ve recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it’s completely free.


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As the February 2013 LSAT approaches, a blizzard is striking the East coast. The LSAC rarely cancels tests, but this year the storm is severe enough that testing has been suspended at a few test centers.

Odds are, your test center is not affected. Be sure to monitor the official notice of cancellations here:

http://www.lsac.org/jd/announcements-and-news.asp#weather

The LSAT does not appear to have announced what happens if your test is postponed, but from past experience they will contact you to schedule a retake in 1-3 weeks. If that happens to you, continue practicing as usual: timed practice tests are the best way to prepare at this point.

Good luck!

Featured image: snowman credit oimax

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