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cover-preptest-BI took PrepTest B (the February 1999 LSAT) under simulated testing conditions.  I want to share some of my thoughts with you.  This post will cover Logic Games for which I have already made the videos lessons (with links below).

**Spoiler Alert**

Stop reading if you haven't taken this prep test yet.  It'll ruin the test for you.

LSAT B Logic Game Summaries and Video Explanation Links

Game 1 - Eight boats arrive at a dock.  They are named Jewel, Kashmir, Neptune, Ojibwa, Pacific, Spain, Tornado, and Valhalla.

Game 2 - A park contains at most five of seven kinds of trees.  The trees are firs, laurels, maples, oaks, pines, spruces, and yews.

Game 3 - Four married couples dine at a circular table.  They are named Francisco, Gabrielle, Kyoko, Lee, Olivia, Peter, Raymond, and Simone.

Game 4 - Zeno's unfinished furniture sells five types of furniture.  Footstools, hutches, sideboards, tables, and vanities.  From the five, Irene will buy four.  Each piece Irene buys will be made from a kind of wood: maple, oak, pine, rosewood.

Game 1 - Eight boats arrive at a dock

This is a simple, easy sequencing game.  We've seen very similar reincarnations of this game before.  You should finish this in under 5 minutes if you want to get through all the games in this set.  Your proficiency with the basic sequencing chart will determine how quickly you can push through this game.

Game 2 - A park contains trees

This is a very difficult in/out game.  If you do not normally have enough time to finish all the games, this is the one you should skip.  The rules that make this game hard are the last two rules.  One of them has an embedded conditional.  Both of them demand that you represent them visually to fully understand how they control the pieces on the game board.  Once you do that, you can split the game into three sub-game boards to use up these two confusing rules.

Game 3 - Married couples dine at a circular table

This is a medium difficulty spatial game.  You can think of it as a circular sequencing game.  It's unusual because of the circular game board.  Aside from that, this game is not very difficult.  Hit the questions quick after a brief, simple game board setup.  For many of the questions, you'll have to draw sub-game boards that cater to them.

Game 4 - Zeno's sells furniture

This is a hardish in/out game with grouping within the in group.  Since there's only one item in the out group, you should split the game board up into two sub-game boards to accomodate the two possible items that could be out.  Once you do that, you can focus your attention of grouping the items within the in group.  In the in group, you have to figure out what wood goes with what type of furniture.  If you're not adept with conditional logic, there is a conditional rule that could potentially be confusing.

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For more Logic Games explanations like these, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we’ve recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Full access included in 7Sage LSAT Premium and above.


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As the February 2013 LSAT approaches, a blizzard is striking the East coast. The LSAC rarely cancels tests, but this year the storm is severe enough that testing has been suspended at a few test centers.

Odds are, your test center is not affected. Be sure to monitor the official notice of cancellations here:

http://www.lsac.org/jd/announcements-and-news.asp#weather

The LSAT does not appear to have announced what happens if your test is postponed, but from past experience they will contact you to schedule a retake in 1-3 weeks. If that happens to you, continue practicing as usual: timed practice tests are the best way to prepare at this point.

Good luck!

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Congratulations to everyone who took down the LSAT last Saturday.  For everyone who has their sights on the February and June LSATs, without further ado, it is time to reveal who won LSAT Premium.

Drum roll...

The winner is... Deep Brar!  Congratulations.  We asked Deep if he had anything he would like to say:

"Wow! Thank you so much for this! I've been trying to study for the LSAT on my own and have been struggling a bit, but now that I have access to all of these amazing resources in the LSAT Premium course I feel like I should have no problem at all :)" - Deep Brar

So many of you accumulated tons of entries by spreading the word that we had four times more entries than the last time we ran this!  That clearly couldn't go unacknowledged, so we decided to award a copy of LSAT Complete to whoever managed to score the most entries.

Now, the award for Most Prolific Propagation goes to Corey Varma.  Congratulations Corey!  Corey also had a few words to share:

"From free Logic Game explanations to awesome pro-tips and everything in between, you guys are the best!" - Corey Varma

 If you didn't win, fear not.  You can still get an LSAT course for less than a third the cost of the other guys.

[Note: LSAC has stopped us from releasing our free logic game explanations as of November 15, 2019 (more details)]


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Ever get that deja vu feeling when you do a Logic Game?  Like you've done a game like that one before?  That's because most Logic Games are very similar to each other.  You can get better by mastering the games one type at a time.

Download our Logic Games Cheatsheet to see how we categorize the Logic Games from LSAT PTs 35-50.


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Are you getting ready to take the February or June LSAT next year?  Enter to win a free LSAT Premium course!  This contest is open everyone, including students already enrolled in a 7Sage course.*

This contest ends at 11pm ET, December 2nd, which is after the December LSAT.  If you are taking the December LSAT, and haven't done so yet, enroll in a course, or get supplementary materials, so you'll be ready to crush that LSAT.

Pro-tip: There are plenty of extra entries to be had! You get 13 more entries for following the simple steps, one more entry for every person that clicks on one of your links, and FIVE(!) extra entries for every person who enters the contest with your custom link.  Follow the steps, spread the word, and you will rack up tons of extra entries to get a better chance at winning :D

* If you are already enrolled in a course, then the prizes as are follows:

  • If you are already enrolled in LSAT Complete and win the contest, then you win a free upgrade to LSAT Premium.
  • If are already enrolled in LSAT Premium and win the contest, then you win explanations to LSAT PrepTests 66 and 67, and one hour of private tutoring.
  • If you are already enrolled in LSAT Ultimate and win the contest, then you win the mystery prize.
Featured image: Giveaway (attribution Newsbie Pix)

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December 2012 LSAT Registration Deadline

The most interesting LSAT student in the world wants you to register for the December LSAT

The registration deadline for the December 2012 LSAT is October 29th. That's this Monday. Don't forget to register.

If you're on the fence about a retake, don't wait to get your scores. Register now. If you don't need to retake, you can get a partial refund. This is important, it's worth losing a small fee to be sure you're registered. The refund deadline is November 9th, 2012.

There is a late registration deadline on November 9th, but it's more expensive and there's no guarantee you'll get a seat.

The December 2012 test date is Saturday, December 1st.

Have you ever missed a registration deadline? Let us know in the comments!

p.s. I actually missed an LSAT registration deadline myself once :(


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LSAT score conversions can seem intimidating at first. You have no idea what a raw score or scaled score means. Fortunately, it's not that tough. Soon you'll know exactly how to find out your score.

Each LSAT has about 100 or 101 questions. You get one point for getting a question right, and there is no penalty for guessing.

Your "raw score" is just the total number of questions you get right.

Converting Raw Scores To LSAT Scaled Scores

Your scaled score is a mark out of 180, and it's the one that counts. Law schools use this to compare you against students who wrote different LSATs.

Each LSAT has it's own formula for converting raw scores to scaled scores. You can find it at the back of the test.

Take your raw score, and look at the chart. There will be two columns: highest and lowest. These show the highest and lowest raw scores that let you get a certain scaled score.

If this sounds complicated, don't worry: Just find your number in one of the columns, then read the scaled score that's in the same row. That's your score.

Example: Finding a Scaled Score For The June 2007 LSAT

I'll give you an example using the June 2007 LSAT. Let's pretend you got the following scores:

  • Logic Games: 14/23
  • Logical Reasoning I: 18/25
  • Logical Reasoning II: 20/25
  • Reading Comprehension: 19/27

Add them up: 14 + 18 + 20 + 19 = 71

Then look at page 38, which has the scoring scale. You can see 71 in the "lowest" column. It's the lowest score you could get to get a 156 (not bad for a first score!). A raw score of 72 would also have gotten a 156. That's the "highest" raw score that qualified.

Believe it or not, you now know everything there is to know about calculating your LSAT score.

You're probably wondering what your score means, and what an LSAT percentile is. Stay tuned, that's a topic for an upcoming post!

For more detailed explanation of LSAT score conversion, check out this post.

Click here to use our LSAT score calculator to figure out your raw and scaled score.

 

Featured image: dome credit seier+seier

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We want to help you study for the December LSAT. So, we're giving away a a pair of free LSAT courses. The contest is open until Midnight, October 19th.

Grand Prize: LSAT Premium course - $349 value

Runner-Up Prize: LSAT Complete Course - $179 value

These courses will teach you everything you need to get a good score in December.

lsat contest

You get one entry just for signing up. But you can increase your chance to win by sharing....you like sharing, right? For every friend you get to enter, you get ten additional entries.

You can share via Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin or URL once you sign up.

Good luck in December! You can enter the contest here.

 

Featured image: Giveaway (attribution Newsbie Pix)

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The video is an excerpt from our online LSAT course. If you like the video, you'll like the course. If you want to give it a test run first, you can sign up for our free trial.

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Reading Comprehension might feel impossible to improve at. Either you read well, or you don't, right?

While a lot of students find it tough to get better at LSAT Reading Comprehension, don't let that stop you. There are ways to get better at RC.

The video above gives you an Introduction To Reading Comprehension. For more RC tips, check out the Memory Method for Reading Comprehension.

Material Covered In The Video

Active reading

  • New, unfamiliar, boring subject matter and vocabulary
    • Familiarity with subject matter matters
    • Be well read
  • Focus, Focus, Focus!
  • Ask questions
  • Piece information together as you read
  • Use your imagination
  • Anticipate the direction of the passage

How they lose you

  • You fall asleep
  • Referential phrasing
  • Modifiers/embedded clauses
  • Push back/connect the dots

Things they care about

  • Main point/conclusion
    • Factually accurate?
    • Correct emphasis?
  • Author’s attitude or tone
  • Facts, details
    • Can you clearly recall the facts with accuracy?
    • Can you push out inferences from these facts and details?
  • Passage structure
    • Relationship between the paragraphs
      • The flow of concepts/ideas
  • Different arguments, different view points
    • Clearly distinguish

Miscellany

  • So many words!
  • Humanities, Law, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences
  • Last passage packed w/questions – 7 or 8
  • Practice skipping questions for time
  • Focus spending time upfront on the passage
    • Wrong answers are time sinks

The video was an excerpt from our online LSAT course. If you liked the video, you'll like the course. If you want to give it a test run first, you can sign up for our free trial.


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