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Translating "Cannot" in In/Out Games and Grouping Games

anjkumar87anjkumar87 Alum Member
edited February 2018 in Logic Games 13 karma

Hi all,

I'm struggling with the translation of "cannot."

In an In/Out game if A & B "cannot" be together, then:
- is A <--> not B and B <--> not A (or rather, is a biconditional relationship necessarily created)? because they are always apart/never together?

In a Grouping game, if A & B "cannot" be together, then:
- is a negate necessary the only result? - is A ---> not B and B --> A?

Comments

  • akistotleakistotle Member 🍌🍌
    edited February 2018 9361 karma

    @anjkumar87 said:
    Hi all,

    I'm struggling with the translation of "cannot."

    In an In/Out game if A & B "cannot" be together, then:
    - is A <--> not B and B <--> not A (or rather, is a biconditional relationship necessarily created)? because they are always apart/never together?

    In a Grouping game, if A & B "cannot" be together, then:
    - is a negate necessary the only result? - is A ---> not B and B --> A?

    Hi @anjkumar87,

    In/Out Game
    If A and B cannot be together and A and B have to be in the In group or the Out group, then you have to represent it as A <---> /B.

    Grouping Game
    There are more than two groups with items that are not repeatable, and A and B cannot be together, you should represent it as A ---> /B because this means that if A is in one group, B cannot be in that group. There is no particular Out group. We look at each group as "In group", and we see that if A is in a group, B has to be in other groups.

    This discussion might clear things up:
    https://7sage.com/discussion/#/discussion/14156/confusing-bi-conditional-vs-not-both-in-lg

  • goingfor99thgoingfor99th Member
    3072 karma

    Do you have the test and game number?

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