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Help with must be true/ most strongly supported questions

Its_MyAmbitionIts_MyAmbition Alum Member

What is the best way to approach these questions? I’m not with 7Sage but using powerscore bibles and have the LSAT trainer but haven’t used it yet. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • keets993keets993 Alum Member 🍌
    6045 karma

    Basically, you can't make any assumptions. You have to read each statement exactly as it states and push the statements together to make any inferences if you can, similar to logic games.

    Sometimes, you won't be able to anticipate ahead of time what the answer choice will be. But no matter what, it has to be supported by ONLY the statements provided in the stimulus.

  • Logic GainzLogic Gainz Alum Member
    700 karma

    Ask yourself before diving into the answer choices, "Which of these can I prove?"

    I know the bar doesn't have to be as high as with MBTs but this question in mind helps me eliminate unnecessarily strong/specific answer choices pretty easily. Also, Most Strongly Supported questions are usually pretty difficult at first, but they become like clockwork the more you see them because LSAC uses similar wrong answer choices. Hope this helps, player.

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    1777 karma

    For MBT questions: the opposite of "must be true" is "could be false". Go down the list of answer choices and ask yourself if it's possible for the answer to be false. If so, it doesn't have to be true.

    MSS answers can be anticipated at times.. usually, if the question is an easy one. However, you're typically going to have to go down the list of answer choices/use process of elimination. It's kind of like a MBT question but softer-- so the answer is likely true, but not definitely true.

  • JustDoItJustDoIt Alum Member
    3112 karma

    I agree with everyone else. The one thing that I would add is that these questions differ in strategy: the information flows down from the stiumulus as opposed to up from the answer choices. In other words, you use the stimulus to push out an answer choice that either is most strongly supported or must be true based on the information above. This runs counter to the norm, which is that information flows upward from the answer choices.

    Also, these questions require you to not be critical. You are simply using the information provided in order to get an answer choice. Hope this helps.

  • Its_MyAmbitionIts_MyAmbition Alum Member
    362 karma

    @"samantha.ashley92" said:
    For MBT questions: the opposite of "must be true" is "could be false". Go down the list of answer choices and ask yourself if it's possible for the answer to be false. If so, it doesn't have to be true.

    MSS answers can be anticipated at times.. usually, if the question is an easy one. However, you're typically going to have to go down the list of answer choices/use process of elimination. It's kind of like a MBT question but softer-- so the answer is likely true, but not definitely true.

    Ok so just to make sure i am correct. For all must be true questions i always go with the opposite, which is “could be false” ?

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    1777 karma

    You have to eliminate 4 answer choices that could be false. If it could be false, it doesn’t have to be true.

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