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Cancel or no ?

lsatgirl-1lsatgirl-1 Alum Member
edited January 2019 in General 256 karma

Hi everyone, I am need of advice.
I wrote the LSAT yesterday. I don't think I did too well. I have a feeling I am going to write it again. I am debating if I should cancel it ? If I cancel it, will this appear on my record ? But at the same time, I think it would be smart to get an idea how I did. I am just worried that if the score is too bad, it may look bad on my application.
Any advice would be appreciated :)

Comments

  • lsat_kp20lsat_kp20 Alum Member
    148 karma
  • Sue Doe NimbSue Doe Nimb Alum Member
    183 karma

    I thought I bombed my LSAT and got five points higher than expected. We tend to be very hard on ourselves after the test. However, I'm generally pessimistic about my scores on practice tests. If you are as well, I would think twice about cancelling.

  • Adam HawksAdam Hawks Alum Member
    990 karma

    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

  • Amrina96kAmrina96k Alum Member
    144 karma

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

  • ChardiggityChardiggity Alum Member
    336 karma

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

    It's not ideal, but outside of HYS, you're probably going to be fine. Try to only take when you're really feeling ready & PTing in your ideal range to keep from having 10 tries on your record ;-)

  • ChardiggityChardiggity Alum Member
    336 karma

    @nimra123 basically only cancel if you had a massive mis-bubble section, passed out during the test, etc. Otherwise your feelings can straight up lie to you. Maybe you didn't do well, but it's entirely possible that you did, as others have noted above.

  • Amrina96kAmrina96k Alum Member
    144 karma

    @Chardiggity said:

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

    It's not ideal, but outside of HYS, you're probably going to be fine. Try to only take when you're really feeling ready & PTing in your ideal range to keep from having 10 tries on your record ;-)

    I took the lsat twice already, and my score improved the second time around. However, although i didn't feel 100% ready, i still went ahead and wrote the saturday lsat (my 3rd attempt). But i don't feel very confident about it. I have a strong feeling i scored lower than my last score. I will be writing it again in June or July (any advice on which one I should register for?)
    So my dilemma now is if i should just wait to see how i did on Saturday or cancel my score? If i don't cancel it i'll have 3 attempts on my file, and then a 4th one in june/july.

  • ChardiggityChardiggity Alum Member
    336 karma

    @Amrina96k A cancel will show up on your record, so it will still show as 3 attempts. So in that regard a cancel won't necessarily help you. 4 takes isn't ideal, but it's also not excessive. Schools only have to take that sweet, sweet top score, and that's what they do!

    As far as June or July goes, it depends on whether you want to take the 50% chance of sitting the digital LSAT or not. If you'd way rather have the certainty of paper, you should probably knuckle down for June. If the way it's administered doesn't concern you, then study until your PT scores are a little above your ideal score. I assume if you're considering the July, that you'd be applying for a 2020 start, right? If so, you could even go for September. I know all of the law school admissions pages say "Rolling basis! Apply early!", but a late September or early October application is still very competitive timing. All to say that you should take the test when you feel ready to crush it and not have to worry about it a 5th time ;-)

  • Amrina96kAmrina96k Alum Member
    144 karma

    @Chardiggity said:
    @Amrina96k A cancel will show up on your record, so it will still show as 3 attempts. So in that regard a cancel won't necessarily help you. 4 takes isn't ideal, but it's also not excessive. Schools only have to take that sweet, sweet top score, and that's what they do!

    As far as June or July goes, it depends on whether you want to take the 50% chance of sitting the digital LSAT or not. If you'd way rather have the certainty of paper, you should probably knuckle down for June. If the way it's administered doesn't concern you, then study until your PT scores are a little above your ideal score. I assume if you're considering the July, that you'd be applying for a 2020 start, right? If so, you could even go for September. I know all of the law school admissions pages say "Rolling basis! Apply early!", but a late September or early October application is still very competitive timing. All to say that you should take the test when you feel ready to crush it and not have to worry about it a 5th time ;-)

    I've applied for this cycle, but i will be applying again for the next cycle. My only confusion is will it be worse to have a cancelation on my file or a third attempt that's lower than the second one?

    My score is in the low 150s, and i want atleast a 160 for my next one, so i might just do it in June because I don't know how i feel about the electronic tests.

  • ChardiggityChardiggity Alum Member
    336 karma

    @Amrina96k I believe it's a wash between a cancellation and a lower score. The lower score won't hurt you. With no longer having to average scores, and there no longer being a limit on the number of times you can take, schools have NO incentive not to just take your highest score and run with it. It's all they have to report, it's all that affects their rankings, so it's all they care about. It might be slightly different if you want to apply T14, but otherwise you should be fine.

  • Amrina96kAmrina96k Alum Member
    144 karma

    @Chardiggity said:
    @Amrina96k I believe it's a wash between a cancellation and a lower score. The lower score won't hurt you. With no longer having to average scores, and there no longer being a limit on the number of times you can take, schools have NO incentive not to just take your highest score and run with it. It's all they have to report, it's all that affects their rankings, so it's all they care about. It might be slightly different if you want to apply T14, but otherwise you should be fine.

    Okay perfect! Thank you so much for all that, I really needed to hear that to help make up my mind.

  • Adam HawksAdam Hawks Alum Member
    990 karma

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

    As @Chardiggity said, it's probably not a big deal as long as you don't have 10 cancellations. You will know going into your next proctored exam where your score range will be. I would not take the test again until you are consistently close to your target score. Even if a school asks you to write an addendum asking why you have so many scores on record, do not worry about it because you can always mention that you knew that you were capable of excelling on the test.

    I know you are worried about the digital LSAT, but just wait and see to see if it is doom and gloom or a godsend.

  • Amrina96kAmrina96k Alum Member
    144 karma

    @"Adam Hawks" said:

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

    As @Chardiggity said, it's probably not a big deal as long as you don't have 10 cancellations. You will know going into your next proctored exam where your score range will be. I would not take the test again until you are consistently close to your target score. Even if a school asks you to write an addendum asking why you have so many scores on record, do not worry about it because you can always mention that you knew that you were capable of excelling on the test.

    I know you are worried about the digital LSAT, but just wait and see to see if it is doom and gloom or a godsend.

    Thank you so much!
    In your opinion @"Adam Hawks", would it be a better option just to cancel my score from yesterday (i'm almost 100% sure it's lower than my last attempt), or just keep it even if it is lower than my first two attempts?

    I know everyone says that cancelling it or keeping it is pretty much the same thing, but i'm still debatig about whether one will be better than another.

  • Better every dayBetter every day Legacy Member
    246 karma

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

    As @Chardiggity said, it's probably not a big deal as long as you don't have 10 cancellations. You will know going into your next proctored exam where your score range will be. I would not take the test again until you are consistently close to your target score. Even if a school asks you to write an addendum asking why you have so many scores on record, do not worry about it because you can always mention that you knew that you were capable of excelling on the test.

    I know you are worried about the digital LSAT, but just wait and see to see if it is doom and gloom or a godsend.

    Thank you so much!
    In your opinion @"Adam Hawks", would it be a better option just to cancel my score from yesterday (i'm almost 100% sure it's lower than my last attempt), or just keep it even if it is lower than my first two attempts?

    I know everyone says that cancelling it or keeping it is pretty much the same thing, but i'm still debatig about whether one will be better than another.

    I agree with most people’s comments. I think that in your case just get the score you don’t know for sure that you did terrible and like other people have said, the school’s only need to report the highest score so their is little incentive for them to penalize multiple takes. In my opinion 4 is kind of the border for when I think it starts to get excessive. 5 or 6 seems like a bit much and unless you are showing steady improvement I think at that point it can start to hurt you a little.

  • Amrina96kAmrina96k Alum Member
    144 karma

    @"Better every day" said:

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:

    @Amrina96k said:

    @"Adam Hawks" said:
    Don't cancel. Schools only care about your highest score.

    Doesn't it look bad on our application if we have so many attempts with low scores?

    As @Chardiggity said, it's probably not a big deal as long as you don't have 10 cancellations. You will know going into your next proctored exam where your score range will be. I would not take the test again until you are consistently close to your target score. Even if a school asks you to write an addendum asking why you have so many scores on record, do not worry about it because you can always mention that you knew that you were capable of excelling on the test.

    I know you are worried about the digital LSAT, but just wait and see to see if it is doom and gloom or a godsend.

    Thank you so much!
    In your opinion @"Adam Hawks", would it be a better option just to cancel my score from yesterday (i'm almost 100% sure it's lower than my last attempt), or just keep it even if it is lower than my first two attempts?

    I know everyone says that cancelling it or keeping it is pretty much the same thing, but i'm still debatig about whether one will be better than another.

    I agree with most people’s comments. I think that in your case just get the score you don’t know for sure that you did terrible and like other people have said, the school’s only need to report the highest score so their is little incentive for them to penalize multiple takes. In my opinion 4 is kind of the border for when I think it starts to get excessive. 5 or 6 seems like a bit much and unless you are showing steady improvement I think at that point it can start to hurt you a little.

    Thank you so much for that!
    You mentioned that a steady improvement won't hurt. So even if my third attempt has a lower score than my first two, should i still consider keeping it on my record?

  • Adam HawksAdam Hawks Alum Member
    990 karma

    Focus on your process. Use the 7Sage analytics to figure out your weak points. Don't worry so much about your next proctored test. The better you do on your PTs, the better the law student you will be. This is a lot of would-ifs. Let's focus on what is ahead now.

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