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Does the game section diagram repeat?

Webby_GangnamWebby_Gangnam Monthly Member
edited August 2021 in Logic Games 534 karma

Dear everyone,

I am on the game section of the CC. I am amazed by the creativity of JY to draw these beautiful diagrams. My concern is that I was not born with an innate knowledge on how to draw these diagrams, and I have to watch JY’s explanation videos every time to understand how to visually represent the game pieces and rules. I am just wondering if I would have to watch all game videos from all available practice tests (PT1-90, I believe) to learn how to draw these game pieces and rules. I don’t mind, but I am just curious – does, at one point, patterns on drawing these emerge, and we are able to draw game pieces and rules without having to watch JY’s videos on how to draw them? I would like to emulate JY’s method as I find them easy to understand and visually represent, but I am unsure of how I would be able to autonomously draw these game pieces and rules when I actually encounter a fresh game section. After watching the video and learning how to visually represent the game pieces and rules, I am able to finish the game section within the target time with not even a single incorrect answer. This is what JY advised to do – print ten copies of the game and keep doing them until we can finish it within the target time without getting any question wrong. Could anyone please share light on this? Let me summarize my questions below:

1) Does, at one point, patterns on drawing these emerge, and we are able to draw game pieces and rules without having to watch JY’s videos on how to draw them?
2) What I am asking is, at what point in the LSAT journey would we be able to autonomously draw the game pieces and rules without having to refer to JY’s explanation video?

Best,
Ken

Comments

  • xo_f4iryxo_f4iry Alum Member
    85 karma

    Hi! I also kept on repeating the same game until getting all the questions right and in time. The more you keep doing them, you will pick up patterns! Have faith in that. I think with a solid 2-3 weeks of drilling Logic Games , you'll be able to see your skills improve. Possibly faster if you really put in the hours. Also, as you do PTs, 7sage's Analysis will tell you which game types you struggle with.

    Sometimes for "misc" games or "grouping games" your own intuition of drawing diagrams might be set up differently from others', but you'll have understood the rules and still get questions right!

  • Webby_GangnamWebby_Gangnam Monthly Member
    534 karma

    @xo_f4iry said:
    Hi! I also kept on repeating the same game until getting all the questions right and in time. The more you keep doing them, you will pick up patterns! Have faith in that. I think with a solid 2-3 weeks of drilling Logic Games , you'll be able to see your skills improve. Possibly faster if you really put in the hours. Also, as you do PTs, 7sage's Analysis will tell you which game types you struggle with.

    Sometimes for "misc" games or "grouping games" your own intuition of drawing diagrams might be set up differently from others', but you'll have understood the rules and still get questions right!

    sounds good! thank you so much!

  • patra5cgpatra5cg Alum Member
    108 karma

    Hi,

    I would answer yes to both of your questions. But in order to make the process faster, I would advise to focus on practicing one type of game a time. I would divide the game in to linear(relative ordering, elements=positions, more elements than positions, more positions than elements) and grouping ( in/out, basic grouping, grouping game with repeated elements, and group+linear hybrid). The reason why I suggest it is because while the overall LG techniques for those games are similar, they do require different approaches. And it’s important that you become familiar with those approaches and key inferences. For instance, if you are dealing with a more elements than position linear game, you instantly have to know to pay attention to who needs to be out. Since if the out group are filled, everything else have to be in. And most cases there will be a couple of questions just testing this key inferences. Sometimes, there are key rules in linear game that hints scenarios. A common one is a “either or but not both” rule. In grouping game, numerical inferences or two conditional rules often hints scenarios. So I would suggest to practice games by type and practice recognizing common key inferences and scenarios trigger.

  • Webby_GangnamWebby_Gangnam Monthly Member
    534 karma

    @patra5cg said:
    Hi,

    I would answer yes to both of your questions. But in order to make the process faster, I would advise to focus on practicing one type of game a time. I would divide the game in to linear(relative ordering, elements=positions, more elements than positions, more positions than elements) and grouping ( in/out, basic grouping, grouping game with repeated elements, and group+linear hybrid). The reason why I suggest it is because while the overall LG techniques for those games are similar, they do require different approaches. And it’s important that you become familiar with those approaches and key inferences. For instance, if you are dealing with a more elements than position linear game, you instantly have to know to pay attention to who needs to be out. Since if the out group are filled, everything else have to be in. And most cases there will be a couple of questions just testing this key inferences. Sometimes, there are key rules in linear game that hints scenarios. A common one is a “either or but not both” rule. In grouping game, numerical inferences or two conditional rules often hints scenarios. So I would suggest to practice games by type and practice recognizing common key inferences and scenarios trigger.

    awesome. thank you so much! (:

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