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does cancelled score count as take ?

studyinglsat777studyinglsat777 Alum Member
in General 59 karma

I took my first lsat last year august 2020 , though I wasn't ready since it gave me the option to preview my scores. Now I've taken my second exam in october 2021 and want to take one more in November for my goal score. I was advised that I take maximum of 3 lsats and was wondering if the first one also counts as a take?

Comments

  • MonkeyMammoth24MonkeyMammoth24 Alum Member
    789 karma

    No, that’s the point of cancelling it. It’s as if you never even took the test At all.

  • giulia.pinesgiulia.pines Member
    466 karma

    I was told that if you cancel it, it isn't as if you never even took it at all, because under your LSATs scores the schools see "canceled score" and this could mean any number of things. (They might think it's worse than it is, for example.)

  • rubenpinuelas7rubenpinuelas7 Yearly Member
    173 karma

    Last August 2020 doesn’t count as a take. That was when they were still not counting them due to the pandemic. A cancellation still does count as a take. You have two more retakes this cycle.

  • sarakimmelsarakimmel Alum Member
    1488 karma

    Yes, as @rubenpinuelas7 said, every time you register for and take a test, it counts as one of your official takes, regardless if you cancel or keep your score. It sounds like you are more concerned with how the number of tests looks to the schools vs the LSAC limits? In that case, you will find no shortage of folks on 7Sage and elsewhere that got into T-14 schools having taking the LSAT the max number of times. At the end of the day, it is your highest score, and judgement, that is being evaluated. Taking the test multiple times and getting a lower score looks bad, but if you are improving your score, I wouldn't be too concerned.

    Keep in mind, if anyone gives you advice that is hard and fast, ie you can only take the LSAT X number of times, you can't apply after X date, you need to do X to improve your LSAT score, take that with a grain of salt. People know what they have heard and what worked for them, but there is a lot of latitude in the approach to this test and applying to law school. Do your research, listen to your gut and be kind to yourself, not everyone does it the same way!

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