7Sage LSAT Blog

What do I think about the LSAT Trainer?

I rarely recommend LSAT prep material.

Because most of what's out there is shit. Some of it is on balance neutral and rarely do I encounter something that I think will actually be beneficial for you. To some extent, I suppose that's obvious. It's why I founded 7Sage.

But, today I want to vouch for Mike Kim's The LSAT Trainer. The things I like about it, oddly enough, are the same things that I think set 7Sage apart from the riffraff. Complicated ideas broken down in simple digestible language. A dose of inspiration to help you push through the pain and self-doubt. An honest approach that presumes that you have the capacity to understand even the hardest questions on the LSAT. Pretty cool.

Anyway, long story short, if you can afford it ($40) you should get The LSAT Trainer.

Also check out Mike's site. It's also got a ton of excellent free materials. Most recently, Mike and I collaborated on a neat little project picking out "logic games from hell". They're sort of what we consider to be the "hardest" logic games. Ultimately, it's a very subjective thing, but check it out.

Be advised that Mike uses a different approach to categorizing logic games than we do.

Featured image: SqaureFishwithwaterLogo

12 comments

Studying for the LSAT can be demoralizing at times. I’ve been there myself and I know how much that sucks.

I also know that when it gets you down. The most important thing you need is a supportive community who also understands what you’re going through.

Over 1,000 students and teachers gather in the 7Sage LSAT Forums to discuss everything related to the LSAT and law school.  From explanations to specific questions that you don’t understand, to finding an LSAT study buddy, you can find all the help and support you need.

If you’re doing well on the test, the forum is a great place for you to be a teacher and a leader. Help out others who don’t understand the LSAT as well as you do and improve your own understanding at the same time. After all, as Aristotle said, teaching is the highest form of understanding.

Let’s beat the LSAT together!

Featured image: LSAT Community (attribution sindykids)

Comment on this

Practice LSATs can be a gold mine of valuable data on *exactly* what you need to work on to improve.  Unfortunately, most students don't know how to take advantage of this.

That's why we made the most powerful LSAT grader available anywhere.  It will let you drill into your answers to figure out exactly what you did wrong, and what you need to work on.  You can analyze your performance with pretty charts, question and section difficulty ratings, and question type analysis.

Took a prep test recently? Enter your answers into our free grader.  Try keyboard entry, it's a really fast way to enter your scores.  Just use the 1-5 keys to enter your answers, and ~ to input blind review.


Comment on this

Most people take practice LSATs wrong.  I see it all the time, and it sucks because it comes back to bite them in the ass on test day.  I don't want that to happen to you!

The key to practicing LSATs is to simulate the real testing environment as closely as possible.  That way, test day is just like another practice test.  How do you do this?

First, gear up with exactly what you are allowed to use on test date:

  • LSAT printed on paper.  Never take an LSAT displayed from a screen of any kind.

  • No. 2 pencil, eraser and sharpener.  Never use a mechanical pencil, pen, marker etc.

  • Analog wristwatch.  Never use a digital timer - you need to get used to your watch.  If you don't have one yet, use the one in our LSAT Proctor App until you get one.

Secondly, set the mood with the right test environment

  • Find your test location and practice in a similar place.  If you can, practice in the actual test location.

  • You will test in the early morning (unless you are taking the June LSAT, when it is in the early afternoon).  Take your tests at that time.

 

Lastly, listen to the real test instructions with appropriate background noises.

  • This is easy - just download the free LSAT Proctor App in less than 30 seconds (Android app is coming soon)

  • Use the app when you practice.  The app includes real proctoring instructions, realistic background sounds and a virtual analog watch.

That's it!  Now that you know how to take LSATs the *right* way, get the app and take an LSAT Prep Test right now.


Comment on this

It's very important that you print your PrepTests correctly. If you don't, you're denying yourself the opportunity to get comfortable with the actual layout of the test.

Here are the simple steps to follow:

1. Scroll to the first page of Section 1 of your PrepTest.
2. Scroll back 1 page so you're on the page before the first page of Section 1.
3. Start printing on that page.

This way, whether you print single sided or double sided, you'll get the correct layout. An added bonus is that you are NOT printing the cover page which just wastes ink.

Reading Comprehension, for example, opens up like a book. Passage on the left hand side, (most of the) questions on the right hand side. No flipping the page back and forth to go from passage to questions or vice versa.


Comment on this

For most students reading comprehension is the hardest part of the LSAT to improve on.  They feel that reading is a talent that you can't really improve.  Or they may try just reading a lot to improve.

But you can improve!  How?  Use the 7Sage Memory Method.

The key to Reading Comprehension is not reading.  It's comprehension!  It doesn't matter how fast you tear through the passage unless you understand and remember what you read.

The Memory Method trains you to understand and retain the passage you read.  This makes it easier to answer the questions.  To learn the Memory Method, check out this quick video.

In just 10 minutes you can be ready to tackle reading comprehension.  I know you can do it.

Featured image: LSAT Reading Comprehension (attribution ginnerobot)

Comment on this

You already know that taking real LSATs is vital to improving your score.  But properly reviewing the tests you take will really take your score to the next level.

First, let's look at how most people review. They take a timed test or section. When they finish, they flip to the answer key and rush to correct their work. "Yes, I'm right - I'm awesome!", or "Argh, I'm wrong - I suck!".

You probably review this way - I did when I started out. Heck, there were times when I flipped to the answers mid test. I just couldn't wait to check.

Unfortunately, this is an AWFUL way to review. Think about it - you don't really care if you were right. This isn't test day, so your points don't count. Some answers might just have been lucky guesses.

You really care whether your reasoning was right. And it's hard to check your reasoning if you check the answers first. Once you see that the answer is D, you'll invent reasons why D is obviously correct. I see students make up wrong reasons for right answers all the time.

The trick is to review questions before you check your answers. We call this Blind Review, and it's the best way to study. For details on how to do it, check out this video we made explaining how do Blind Review.

Featured image: LSAT Trick (attribution kennymatic)

Comment on this

Underestimating your enemy is the biggest mistake you can make in a fight and nearly everyone underestimates how difficult the LSAT is.

Let’s avoid that blunder right now. The LSAT is hard. Really f*ng hard. Law school is even harder. If you already knew this, then you’re in better shape than the vast majority of prospective law students. High five! If you didn’t get a high five but want a high five, just reread this paragraph until you get one.

I will often remind you that this test is hard. This is simply to remind you that you need to study to do well. If the idea of taking a hard test that you need study for is very scary for you, you may want to rethink going to law school.

One last time: The LSAT is hard. Understood? Good, you just avoided the biggest mistake that LSAT newbies make.

And, you also happen to be half way done with your first LSAT lesson! ​Get a Free Account and finish the rest of it in less than one minute and be on your way to defeating the LSAT.

Featured image: LSAT Number 1 Mistake Double Facepalm (attribution darkuncle)

Comment on this

Are you wondering about how our course compares against the competition’s?

You already know that we’re way more affordable than the other courses that cost thousands of dollars but let’s be honest: you care more about how effective our course is.

Don’t just wonder about it. Read what our students have said. Check out our course reviews.

We have over 50 unfiltered and unbiased reviews of the course by current and past students, many of whom have used other LSAT prep courses. They leave insightful detailed reviews of exactly how they think we compare to other LSAT courses.

Stop wondering who’s got a better LSAT course and take a look right now: http://7sage.com/lsat-course-reviews/

Featured image: LSAT Reviews (attribution Nomadic Lass)

Comment on this

Did you know that 7Sage is a balls to the wall online LSAT prep system that is more exciting than watching a bear fight a robot shark?

Well, maybe not.

But it will help you get the highest LSAT score possible. And a high LSAT score is the single most important factor to getting into a great law school and raking in scholarships. By signing up for a 7Sage account, you’re making a smart investment in your future.

Here are just five of the great LSAT tools that you'll get with a free 7Sage account:

  • Logic game explanations in HD video for every single LSAT logic game. Ever.

  • Discussion forum where you can connect with over 1,000 other LSAT students.  Share, learn, laugh, cry, and celebrate with our wonderful community of students and teachers.

  • A preview of the best LSAT courses in all the universes, obviously

  • iPhone app to perfectly proctor your LSAT Prep Tests.  Android app is coming soon too.

  • LSAT Grader to track every LSAT you take.  Analyze your performance, learn your strengths and weaknesses, and target your focus for maximal efficiency.

Register now and get started in less than 15 seconds.

Featured image: Free LSAT Tools - attribution: Rupert Ganzer)

Comment on this