PT9.S3.Q8-13 (Logical Operators)

tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
edited November 2017 in Logic Games 3679 karma

Hi all,

In the explanation for this game board (https://7sage.com/lesson/inout-game-2-game-board-setup/?ss_completed_lesson=17878), JY uses group 3 logical operator, unless, to translate the lawgic. I thought that he would use group 4, cannot. How do we know which logical operator to use when there are two in the sentence?

Comments

  • akistotleakistotle Member 🍌🍌
    9361 karma

    You can use either one and you will end up with the same thing.

    N cannot be in unless L is in.

    Group 3 translation:
    Step 1) The logical operator: "unless"
    Step 2) Identify the two main concepts: “N cannot be in” and “L is in”
    Step 3) Assign symbols to the two main concepts: Here, “/N” for “N cannot be in” and “L” for “L is in.”
    Step 4) Apply the translation rule: Here, pick an idea - “/N” - and negate it - “N” - and make it the sufficient condition.
    N → L

    Group 4 translation:
    Step 1) The logical operator: "cannot"
    Step 2) Identify the two main concepts: "N is in" and "unless L is in"
    Step 3) Assign symbols to the two main concepts: Here, “N” for "N is in" and "/L" for "unless L is in"
    Step 4) Apply the translation rule: Here, pick an idea - “N” - and negate it - “/N” - and make it the necessary condition.
    /L → /N

    I find Group 3 much simpler. As soon as "A cannot be in unless B is in," I immediately translate it as A → B because in order for A to be in, B must be in.

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @akistotle why does 'unless L is in' translate to '/L'?

  • akistotleakistotle Member 🍌🍌
    edited November 2017 9361 karma

    "Unless" means "if … not" or "except if," so "unless L is in" means "the case where L is not in."

  • dcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdc Alum Member
    edited November 2017 382 karma

    Agreed with the above. I always found it easier to think of these types of statements as the below:

    No N without L, which is equivalent to N requires L

    N --> L

  • akistotleakistotle Member 🍌🍌
    9361 karma

    @dcdcdcdcdc said:
    Agreed with the above. I always found it easier to think of these types of statements as the below:

    No N without L, which is equivalent to N requires L

    N --> L

    Yea. I learned this thinking that all those lyrics about "I can't live without you" basically means that "I need you." lol

    So I go like, "Okay....N needs L...." whenever I see sentences like that.

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @akistotle @dcdcdcdcdc thzmks guys! I get it but it's still not cemented in my head just need more practice ugh learning this is so hard lol. So 'unless' should always be considered a / right?

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