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This feels like a stupid question

pegahnasrollpegahnasroll Monthly Member
in General 84 karma

Hi, I am extremely confused on how the LSAT is graded, I've been studying for over a year now and can not figure it out. If one section is "experimental" and is "ungraded" why are we being graded out of all four sections on these prep tests? Is that the same way we'll be graded when taking the actual exam? Im just confused what the purpose of the experimental section is if we get graded on it as well.

Comments

  • a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member
    633 karma

    The previous prep tests have 4 graded sections because the LSAT used to be 1 LG, 2LR, 1 RC graded sections +1 experimental, with it moving to flex and covid, they reduced the amount of graded sections and just recently in August re-added the experimental section

  • MonkeyMammoth24MonkeyMammoth24 Alum Member
    789 karma

    The LSAT has traditionally been a 5 section test. the PT's that you've been taking are 4 sections because those are the sections that were graded for that administration of the test. If you were to take the exact same PT on the real test day, you would have had another section that is not scored. They don't release experimental sections so that they can use the questions for later tests. In other words, the LSAT has usually been 4 graded, 1 ungraded. These are the PT's you've been practicing with.

    After covid, they moved to the 3 section test with no experimental, all of which were graded. Then in August they reintroduced the experimental section, but only went to 4 sections instead of back to the normal 5 section format. On test day, you'll have four sections on the test and one of them will not be scored. The number of questions you'll be scored on will be out of about 76, whereas traditionally it's been out of 100.

    Super confusing now that I've tried to explain this but I hope that makes sense.

  • pegahnasrollpegahnasroll Monthly Member
    84 karma

    @MonkeyMammoth24 thank you so much!! I was SO confused and could not figure out for the life of me how many sections were actually going to be graded. You worded it perfectly!

  • mesposito886mesposito886 Alum Member
    248 karma

    You also have the option to "Simulate Flex" on the prep tests before you take them - when you click that button, one of the LR sections is removed from your prep test. I recommend doing this and adding a random section from another test as the "experimental" to recreate the format of the test more closely and to see how you score on a test with only 75 questions, as opposed to 100-101 questions.

  • pegahnasrollpegahnasroll Monthly Member
    84 karma

    @mesposito886 I did not think about that, thats a good idea. I didn't want to stimulate "flex" because I wanted to see how the actual exam would feel, but I also wanted to see what my score would be without that last section. Thank you for the suggestion!

  • LetsWreckThisLetsWreckThis Alum Member
    15 karma

    @mesposito886 When you simulate flex on a PT, does the grading translate as well, or does it get weird since it's missing an originally graded LR section? Also, how do you add a random section to simulate the experimental? Do you just open another 7Sage tab with a random section pulled up and go over to it at some point during the flex-simulated test? Or is there a way to add a random section? Thank you!

  • mesposito886mesposito886 Alum Member
    248 karma

    @"Michael M." said:
    @mesposito886 When you simulate flex on a PT, does the grading translate as well, or does it get weird since it's missing an originally graded LR section? Also, how do you add a random section to simulate the experimental? Do you just open another 7Sage tab with a random section pulled up and go over to it at some point during the flex-simulated test? Or is there a way to add a random section? Thank you!

    Grading does translate for the 75 questions. Only downside is that it takes out the second LR section (which may be harder or a more accurate reflection of the LR section you'll take on the test) so make sure to use those sections as drilling practice or as an experimental section for another test. I just pulled up another test and took a random section, I don't think there's a way to add it to the prep test... yet.

  • mesposito886mesposito886 Alum Member
    248 karma

    @pegahnasroll said:
    @mesposito886 I did not think about that, thats a good idea. I didn't want to stimulate "flex" because I wanted to see how the actual exam would feel, but I also wanted to see what my score would be without that last section. Thank you for the suggestion!

    I strongly recommend you simulate the flex and add a random section of another test as your "experimental" section. If you just take the four section tests as they are, you're banking on having two LR sections during your actual test, which may not be the case. I find changing up the "experimental" section (and not always taking it as your last section - slip it in between two real sections) better prepares you for the many ways the test can be presented to you day of.

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