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I made digital flashcards for LR concepts. Enjoy!

LetsHigh5LetsHigh5 Alum Member
edited May 2018 in Study Guides/Cheat Sheets 703 karma
Hey, everyone. In my quest to become an LSAT test-taking machine, I made some digital flashcards to help me memorize some key concepts in LR:

-- Valid/Invalid argument forms
-- Logical Fallacies
-- Stimuli Indicators (premise/conclusion, sufficient/necessary, causation, some/most/all)
-- Question Stems
-- Strategies by Question Type

I'm going to flip through these every day from now until the September test date until they can instantly be recalled from memory. And obviously, they're a compliment--not a substitute--for other forms of preparation. I thought I'd pass them along, just in case you find them useful, too.

If you like them, great!
If you don't like them, please tell me how you think they can be improved.
If you spot an error, please let me know.
If you have some great flashcards that help you memorize important LSAT info, please pass it along, too.

Thanks!
«1

Comments

  • SprinklesSprinkles Alum Member
    11542 karma
    Bookmarking. You're a legend!
  • 194 karma
    *slow clap*
  • LSATKingsmanLSATKingsman Alum Member
    edited July 2016 1024 karma
    Wow nice. Gold Star

    added to my Favorites. (:
  • Coolmama09Coolmama09 Alum Member
    156 karma
    wow this is beautiful! i really love the valid/invalid argument. do you have this in a PDF file . i would love to print it and shrink it fits on one page. Thanks!!!
  • Nanchito-1-1Nanchito-1-1 Alum Member
    1762 karma
    Cool, thanks!
  • mcmlaw36mcmlaw36 Alum Member
    631 karma
    Bookmark how?! Also.. I would definitely be interested in a PDF file too, if available!!! :) @LetsHigh5. Thanks!
  • nantesorkestarnantesorkestar Alum Member
    431 karma
    @LetsHigh5 You should be knighted by the Queen.
  • Nanchito-1-1Nanchito-1-1 Alum Member
    edited July 2016 1762 karma
    @mcmlaw36 there's a little star to the left of the like button that lights up. To bookmark, click it. You can check your bookmarks to the right of your screen.
  • mcmlaw36mcmlaw36 Alum Member
    631 karma
    Thank you! @nanchito
  • MaxineSPMaxineSP Alum Member
    83 karma
    You can save the PDF on the Quizlet website!!
  • LetsHigh5LetsHigh5 Alum Member
    703 karma
    @Coolmama09 : I can send you a Word file, which you can turn into a PDF, as well. But honestly, I don't think it won't be as effective as studying flashcards. I'm a teacher and the research shows that distributed practice coupled with memory retrieval is far superior for learning than re-reading material. Here is a short but informative video that explains some other quick study hacks based the science of learning, as well.
  • jinbin00jinbin00 Alum Member
    53 karma
    Thank you!
  • notwilliamwallacenotwilliamwallace Alum Member
    1049 karma
    This is literally worth a million dollars. Thank you for creating and sharing.
  • bruingirl1205bruingirl1205 Alum Member
    444 karma
    Thank you for the resource!
  • annannannannannann Alum Member
    304 karma
    This is awesome! Thanks!
  • lenelson2lenelson2 Member
    523 karma
    Very cool. Thanks!
  • draj0623draj0623 Alum Member
    916 karma
    Thank you for sharing! =)
  • palexandrapalexandra Alum Member
    148 karma
    This is so helpful!
    Thank you!
  • 5 karma
    Wow!!! Fantastic job with this! Thank you!!!!
  • _Hopeful_Hopeful Alum Member
    103 karma
    You're awesome!
    Thanks!!!
  • inactiveinactive Alum Member
    12637 karma
    Moved to the study guides section so people have an easier time finding it. :)
  • shawntomvarshawntomvar Member
    16 karma
    Love this community
  • J_ClarksonJ_Clarkson Alum Member
    585 karma
    If this were reddit, you'd be gilded!
  • desire2learndesire2learn Member
    1171 karma
    Unmatched!
  • SprinklesSprinkles Alum Member
    11542 karma
    http://i.imgur.com/4GJoX1L.gif

    Also for anyone interested, I made a quizlet for conditional indicators: https://quizlet.com/164108715/conditional-indicators-drill-flash-cards/
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @montaha.rizeq said:

    Also for anyone interested, I made a quizlet for conditional indicators: https://quizlet.com/164108715/conditional-indicators-drill-flash-cards/
    so clutch! Thank you Montaha!!
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    Where were you when I was first learning these!?
  • John1990John1990 Member
    30 karma
    @LetsHigh5 these have been so helpful, thank you!
  • LsatChicLsatChic Member
    191 karma
    Thank you so much.A major blessing
  • AndWhyisBwrongAndWhyisBwrong Alum Member
    92 karma

    This is the truth! Thanks tremendously!

  • inactiveinactive Alum Member
    12637 karma

    Announcing this in the Study Guides subforum. :)

  • jack.igoejack.igoe Member
    544 karma

    This is awesome! Thanks @LetsHigh5. This community is fantastic.

  • ElleWoods77ElleWoods77 Alum Member
    1184 karma

    this is great thank you so much!

  • TexAgAaronTexAgAaron Alum Member
    1723 karma

    These are amazing! Thank you so much!

  • LetsHigh5LetsHigh5 Alum Member
    703 karma

    *** UPDATE ***
    I don't abandoned the "question stems" and "strategies by question type" linked in the original post. Instead, I combined the two AND updated the cards with improved strategies.

    They're not perfect, of course, but it's definitely more efficient to study this one stack instead of the other two.

    Also, as nice as the visuals of the "valid/invalid argument forms" cards in the original post are, I've since updated my thinking on this, too. It's simpler and for me, better. So, feel free to make your own strategy flashcard with this info. for "all"/"most"/"some" premises:

    • List each conditional premise, 1-by-1
    • Note the "strongest term" on the sufficient side. (Usually an "all", but sometimes a "most"; NEVER a "some").
    • 2 strong terms MUST have a sufficient in common to combine. (Exception: Most A are B, All B are C; you can say Most A are C.)
    • (SOME + SOME) & (SOME + MOST) = Always Invalid

    I hope that helps, everyone.

  • LetsHigh5LetsHigh5 Alum Member
    703 karma

    Please forgive the typos above, everyone. (Rest assured, I actually proofread my flashcards.) :-)

  • dfletch5dfletch5 Alum Member
    260 karma

    @LetsHigh5 said:
    Hey, everyone. In my quest to become an LSAT test-taking machine, I made some digital flashcards to help me memorize some key concepts in LR:

    -- Valid/Invalid argument forms
    -- Logical Fallacies
    -- Stimuli Indicators (premise/conclusion, sufficient/necessary, causation, some/most/all)
    -- Question Stems
    -- Strategies by Question Type

    I'm going to flip through these every day from now until the September test date until they can instantly be recalled from memory. And obviously, they're a compliment--not a substitute--for other forms of preparation. I thought I'd pass them along, just in case you find them useful, too.

    If you like them, great!
    If you don't like them, please tell me how you think they can be improved.
    If you spot an error, please let me know.
    If you have some great flashcards that help you memorize important LSAT info, please pass it along, too.

    Thanks!

    @LetsHigh5 Thanks a million!

  • sandy180sandy180 Alum Member
    159 karma

    @LetsHigh5 said:
    @Coolmama09 : I can send you a Word file, which you can turn into a PDF, as well. But honestly, I don't think it won't be as effective as studying flashcards. I'm a teacher and the research shows that distributed practice coupled with memory retrieval is far superior for learning than re-reading material. Here is a short but informative video that explains some other quick study hacks based the science of learning, as well.

    This is correct! Thanks for the flash cards:)

  • AnthonyScaliaAnthonyScalia Alum Member
    330 karma

    Awesome resource, @sayhey180! I love that so many people here go the extra mile to share their wisdom and labors with each other.

    Out of curiosity, how do you guys use these cards to study? While I love using flashcards for vocabulary, alarm bells go off in my brain at the thought of using flash cards for logic. I fear that even attempting to memorize those rules will stunt my ability to consistently and accurately derive them on my own. In not actually knowing these rules but being able to correctly arrive at them given any LR situation, I get unambiguous feedback and validation that I genuinely understand the logic, and have the skills necessary to pull such functions from a text. I don't want to gain a false sense of security by having the connections be automatic in most cases, only to feel unconditioned and blindly subservient when faced with an inevitable curveball.

    But that's just my speculation as someone who hasn't tried it! Clearly a lot of people use these advantageously. I'd love to hear about how you guys use them so successfully!

  • kleinstdkleinstd Alum Member
    68 karma

    THANK YOU!!! life saver bless you

  • Beast ModeBeast Mode Live Member
    840 karma

    THANK YOU SO MUCH @LetsHigh5 !!!!

  • LetsHigh5LetsHigh5 Alum Member
    703 karma

    (bump)

    Just a reminder to those that just happened upon this post: the update I posted in the comments shows how I improved upon the original post.

  • Eric25Eric25 Member
    720 karma

    @LetsHigh5 Thank you for these!!

  • goingfor99thgoingfor99th Free Trial Member
    3072 karma

    I wish I knew this existed when I started studying. :'[

  • westcoastbestcoastwestcoastbestcoast Alum Member
    3788 karma

    Bump!

  • CurlyQQQCurlyQQQ Alum Member
    edited March 2018 295 karma

    The strategies for each question type is exactly what I've been looking for!! You sir/madame are a stand up citizen! Totally added all of these to my LSAT Folder on quizlet

  • Redentore3337Redentore3337 Alum Member
    350 karma

    Can someone please explain

    "CIRCLE: all conditional, modal, and quantifier words."

    what exactly are conditional, modal, and quantifier words or where I can be directed to learn exactly what those terms mean.

    Thanks!

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @Redentore3337 said:
    Can someone please explain

    "CIRCLE: all conditional, modal, and quantifier words."

    what exactly are conditional, modal, and quantifier words or where I can be directed to learn exactly what those terms mean.

    Thanks!

    The Intro To Logic section of the CC explains all of these... its good, check it out.

    -l.

  • LetsHigh5LetsHigh5 Alum Member
    703 karma

    @Redentore3337 said:
    Can someone please explain

    "CIRCLE: all conditional, modal, and quantifier words."

    what exactly are conditional, modal, and quantifier words or where I can be directed to learn exactly what those terms mean.

    Thanks!

    Conditional Words: words that express a clause/causal relationship, i.e. when something occurs or when it does not (e.g. "if", "unless", "as long as", etc.)

    Modal Words: words that express the likelihood of something occurring or not (e.g. "will", "probably", "can", etc.)

    Quantifier Words: words that express the amounts/degree of something occurring (e.g. "all", "most", "some", etc.)

    Yes, as stated by others, the 7Sage curriculum (or other LSAT resources) are where you'll go to learn these how these specific modifiers affect LSAT arguments.

    And the reason it's so important to notice ANY and ALL of these conditional/modal/quantifier words is that the presence of even one of them in a stimulus or answer choice completely alters argument. In fact, throughout all LR and RC sections, the difference between a valid or invalid argument, or a correct or incorrect answer, will often hinge precisely on the presence of one of these types of words.

    I hope that helps.

  • jkjohnson1991jkjohnson1991 Alum Member
    766 karma

    Much appreciated.

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