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Can you Google stuff during the LSAT Flex?

Mace WinduMace Windu Member
in General 16 karma

Let's say I read a word that I don't recognize. Can I open a new tab to Google the definition really quick?

Comments

  • dos_cooldos_cool Member
    76 karma

    nooooooooo

  • VerdantZephyrVerdantZephyr Member
    2054 karma

    You cannot even have google open.

  • LSATulcerLSATulcer Member
    111 karma

    Are you for real? With the amount of ethical dilemmas LSAT problems pose it didn't cross your mind that this is unethical and constitutes cheating? Or do you just not care?

  • Mace WinduMace Windu Member
    16 karma

    @LSATulcer said:
    Are you for real? With the amount of ethical dilemmas LSAT problems pose it didn't cross your mind that this is unethical and constitutes cheating? Or do you just not care?

    I suspected you couldn't, but came here to verify that. I don't think your condescending and hostile tone was necessary.

  • noonawoonnoonawoon Alum Member
    3481 karma

    ^I think that person was just confused why you would ask this. What kind of test, standardized or not, allows someone to just Google the answers?

  • LSATulcerLSATulcer Member
    111 karma

    I don't think it was hostile. I was expressing my disbelief that someone could possibly think that on a test as rigorous as the LSAT that requires high verbal and logical skill for mastery would be allowed to use Google to cheat. This is a test of words and reasoning. Why would they allow you to look up a word? Many of us have busted our asses to prepare for this test for months (some other people I've seen on this forum have studied for a year+) and you come on here and have the audacity to ask if you can use Google to look up words. You insult.

  • nate12111111nate12111111 Alum Member
    41 karma

    Why would you want to? Its not like the questions are fact-based

  • boston1999-1boston1999-1 Member
    59 karma

    @nate12111111 said:
    Why would you want to? Its not like the questions are fact-based

    "Let's say I read a word that I don't recognize. Can I open a new tab to Google the definition really quick?"

  • EveryCookCanGovernEveryCookCanGovern Alum Member
    401 karma

    Nah you can't. Even if you could, you don't want to. The amount of time you would waste looking up a word would counter any benefit gained from a clearer understanding that you could get from context. The LSAT is written that way specifically so that you don't need to know precisely what is being written but can make inferences from the context. I took every PT ever made and I can only recall /one time/ when knowing the definition of a word actually helped me answer a question, it was a LR question revolving around the word "prudence" and from what I remember it was an old one, somewhere in the 30s I think.

  • basselmasrybasselmasry Free Trial Member
    2 karma

    I don't think it's stupid to ask this question. I'm here because I literally googled the question mentioned in this discussion. Yes, in any other test it would be stupid to ask this question and it would be like asking "Can I cheat and look up the answers". However, given the time limitations in the LSAT, googling something might not be such an advantage, it would also show the test makers your computers skills and time management skills that it would in fact be a good measure of your potential for success as a lawyer (in real life) which is the main purpose of this test (i.e. to gauge your potential for success as a real life lawyer). IF you were presented with a problem in court and had access to a computer (which you will, in real life courts) with internet, and you successfully utilized the computer in very little time that you opposing council took to mentally process the information and come to the correct conclusion, then you're just as good a lawyer as he is in this day and age, in my opinion at least.

    I actually think lsac SHOULD consider allowing test takers to have access to google during the test. I don't think it would be unfair to older test takers that didn't have access to the internet. In previous years, real life lawyers didn't have access to the internet to better solve problems and find the right answers. Today's lawyers do. It only makes sense to test future lawyers (through LSAT) with the same real life condition they would face in the real world.

    Besides, as mentioned earlier, it might not even be the best strategy to waste time and google something, give the time limitation during the test. and IF YOU can do it productively, and gain an extra point over someone that can't (use google fast enough where it's productive), then kudos to you, you just demonstrated computer and online research skills that would in fact make you a better lawyer in the future than those that lack those skills, and you do in fact deserve that extra point on that Law School Admissions Test.

    Furthermore, If you think it's an insult to the design of the test to allow google use, I think it's an insult to real life to have logic games at all. I don't think logic games are useless however, and neither should you think that google use is an added advantage to those that can use it without losing precious time on their own computer, weather that's during the test or in real life.

  • Juan23vrJuan23vr Live Member
    297 karma

    LOL

  • grugthesluggrugtheslug Member
    107 karma

    bro im so glad this question was bumped, my one spark of joy for the day

  • SteFunny-1-1-1SteFunny-1-1-1 Core Member
    edited September 2022 224 karma

    .

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