Thank you 7Sage! 141-->170

a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member

So unbelievably happy! I started my journey in April 2021 with a 141 diagnostic, it was so discouraging to have people tell me there's no way I can get my goal score of 165+ because the jump is too large. WELL, I can finally say I proved them wrong but I always believed in myself--I think it's easy to compare yourself with others while studying for this exam but mindset is everything. Push yourself, study hard but also take time for self care. I struggle with GAD and ADHD and it has been no easy task but with the proper schedule to balance your time efficiently and positive affirmations, you can reach your goal!

Huge shoutout to 7Sage as well, I was at a plateau at 160 since September until I decided to start using the problem sets and video explanations to focus on my weaknesses!

If anyone has any questions, my messages are open :)

Comments

  • Steven_B-1Steven_B-1 Monthly Member
    441 karma

    CONGRATULATIONS!! please share some of the things that helped you reach the upper echelon. What would you different in hindsight? did you use any other resources?

  • Determined_Determined_ Monthly Member
    775 karma

    YAYY!! CONGRATULATIONS! You are always so kind and helpful on this forum. Best of luck to you in all your future endeavors.

  • a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member
    633 karma

    @Steven_B Thank you! Prior to September I wasn't doing any practice tests but I would test my knowledge by doing timed sections (when timing was an issue, I would give myself an extra 5-7 mins at first then would gradually reduce the time as I got more comfortable with the fundamentals--this was super helpful getting me to have a few extra minutes to review at the end and feel more calm as I tackled the questions). During this time I used the powerscore books and I found them super useful to practice with while using LSAC prep plus to get used to the actual lsat format.

    When September hit, I was constantly scoring in the low 160s but not seeing much improvement. I decided to start doing a PT once a week and BR for a whole day and use a wrong answer journal to really understand my thought process. It's easy to take shortcuts and say yeah I understand this, I'll skip it but really breaking down every stimulus, every reading and every game set up, that's where growth comes from. Logic games became my strength just by continuously practicing the games over and over until it became second nature, if you have more specific questions about LG feel free to PM me. LR was my toughest section with really varying results so I decided to get The Loophole by Ellen Cassidy and it was a game changer. It allowed me to "dumb down" the really complex stimulus and find ways to question the arguments, that it became second nature to prephrase the correct answer before going through the answers. RC for me was mostly just timing, for myself, taking notes and underlining/highlighting was not helpful at all and in the end was more time consuming and I'm one of those people that thought everything was important so basically my whole passage would be marked lol--I ended up learning to just take my time reading it slowly the first and only time and made mental notes of the framework of the passage, the main point, authors tone and brief organization of the passage.

    In hindsight, I would have begun doing PT's so much sooner and taking my time to review so that I could come up with a much better analysis of what my weak sections are (not just LR/RC but in terms of question types, game types, difficulty question level etc.)

    Hope this helps a bit, and best of luck studying!

  • a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member
    633 karma

    @Determined_ said:
    YAYY!! CONGRATULATIONS! You are always so kind and helpful on this forum. Best of luck to you in all your future endeavors.

    Aw thank you, I really appreciate that! Best of luck on your journey as well :)

  • amerrittamerritt Monthly Member
    10 karma

    Congratulations!!! That jump is inspiring and epic! You put in the hard work and it paid off! Best of luck on your journey!

  • 14 karma

    Congrats! If you don't mind me asking, did you study everyday for 9 months? How did you avoid burn out?

  • flowerchild72flowerchild72 Monthly Member
    14 karma

    So so happy for you !!!! Woohooo!!!

  • a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member
    633 karma

    @amerritt thank you so much! best of luck on the LSAT and your law school journey :)

  • a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member
    633 karma

    @Danialkamran13 thank you! I was working part-time during my study period so realistically I was studying about 3 hours a day for 6 days of the week, I chose Sundays to give myself a break so that I could start the week fresh. My 3 hours was also not a consistent block, I have ADHD so I really worked to break up my studying in 30 min time blocks and after every 30 mins I would give myself a 5 minute break, this really helped me avoid distractions and giving myself that small reward helped keep me focus throughout those blocks. 3 months before the January LSAT I started doing prep tests 1-2 times a week so it would be slightly longer than 3 hours studying, especially with blind review but was never significantly more than 4-5 hours, and if I had these long study days, I made sure to balance it out the next day by doing a smaller task.
    Ex. Monday: Prep test
    Tuesday: Blind review + analysis
    Wednesday: 1 LG + 1 LR section

    Once you start taking Prep tests, focus on your weaknesses and if you find you're really good at lets say LG, keep your LG practice to 1-2 games a day only and then do a whole section of your weakness. It's not about quantity but the quality of your studying :) Hope this helped!

  • a_pmorenoca_pmorenoc Alum Member
    633 karma

    @flowerchild72 thanks so much! :)

  • amerrittamerritt Monthly Member
    10 karma

    @a_pmorenoc Thank you!! :smiley:

Sign In or Register to comment.