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Insights on overcoming a slump

TheoryandPracticeTheoryandPractice Alum Member
edited April 2017 in General 1008 karma

I sensed a burn out/ slump and took off last Thursday afternoon and the entire weekend. Before taking the time off, I think I was getting emotionally involved with the exam. I was getting anxious just by seeing the questions. I was focusing on getting all the details right and was not in the right mindset to see structures. I think when I get anxious, I tend to want to control everything and understand everything perfectly, which is detrimental to succeeding on the LSAT (and anything in life in general...). Now I am in quite a happy place again. Here's a note to a future self (and also to my current self to ingrain these insights) and to anyone who wants to prevent/ overcome a slump. Please feel free to add any more insights.

  1. Mistakes are important, crucial pieces for improvement. My screen name is theory and practice, because I believe that improvement comes from the going back and forth btw theory and practice. You test a theory/ strategy through practice, see how it works, amend the theory, test it again. Improvement comes from the process of these refinements. Mistakes are not setbacks, but they serve as important clues for progress.
  2. Life is good with or without a high score on the LSAT. When I took time off last weekend, I made a point to enjoy being outside, hang out with as many friends as possible, and really experience that what makes life worth it and fulfilling is the incredible and intangible connection that I make with other people and serving them when I can. That's why I want to go to law school anyway. I can connect with people, and use my talent to the best of my ability regardless of how I do on the LSAT.
  3. Learning is fun. I found the LSAT incredibly fun and intellectually stimulating, and I still do now. When I don't get caught up in my scores, I find studying for the LSAT fun. I get to practice active reading, reading for structure, and actually applying them in real life. I get to think about the weaknesses of the argument and how to make my own argument better in real life. I can't think of the practical utility value for the LG (which is why it is my least favorite section (well, also I am generally bad at it) ), but nevermind, I guess even LG has its practical value; it makes me a disciplined thinker, training me to think step by step. I am a pretty intuitive thinker and not necessarily the most disciplined one. I think it helps me work on my weakness to be a better thinker overall. This is why I like the LSAT so much more than say the SAT or the GRE, because it actually helps me to be a better critical thinker.

Anyways, I think the weekend off helped me to really experience all of the 3 above (these are all quite common wisdom, but really believing in them and acting in accordance with them is a different issue). I'm going to keep this in mind going forward.

Please add any more insights to this if you have them!!

Comments

  • poohbearpoohbear Alum Member
    edited April 2017 496 karma

    So glad you're feeling better about the exam-- burnout is a real problem and I've definitely experienced it before so it's wonderful to hear that you took the much needed time off for yourself. I'm sure you'll jump back into it with much more enthusiasm and focus!

    @TheoryandPractice said:
    I can't think of the practical utility value for the LG (which is why it is my least favorite section (well, also I am generally bad at it) ), but nevermind, I guess even LG has its practical value; it makes me a disciplined thinker, training me to think step by step. I am a pretty intuitive thinker and not necessarily the most disciplined one. I think it helps me work on my weakness to be a better thinker overall.

    As for LG being applicable in real life... sometimes I laugh to myself when my family tries to organize ourselves around the family dinner table and it just reminds me of a real life LG :lol: Trying to make everyone happy at the dinner table is always a challenge...this kid wants to sit next to that kid, but that kid is a child and needs help eating so she needs to be next to her mom etc.

  • Cant Get RightCant Get Right Alum Member Sage 🍌
    26321 karma

    Glad you're feeling recharged! This is one of the best commentaries on burnout I've seen. A lot of people think burnout means something more dramatic than it does, but really it's just when that emotional attachment becomes a bit overwhelming and you just can't deal with LSAT anymore. Its manifestation is subtle, but its effect is drastic. Welcome back!

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