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Higher Numbered Position Rules in LG

TexAgAaronTexAgAaron Legacy Member
in Logic Games 1723 karma

I have made this mistake more often than I should be. Working PT 28, Game 1; simple sequencing game. My only mistake was misinterpreting the rule: "N must be assigned to a higher numbered position than M." I paused because I have messed it up before but still did it wrong and put N-M. Cost me 2 questions.

My question is in sequencing games how to distinguish which number is higher. Let's use 7 spots numbered 1-7. I have had games where 1 is the highest and others like the one I did that 7 is. When 1 is the highest, I have noticed that the rule specifically states this instead of being as casual as the PT 28 was. Is this typically the case? Should I always assume 7 is highest unless specified otherwise?

Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • 1000001910000019 Alum Member
    3279 karma

    In the game you mentioned, it's very clear. 1 is a lower number than 7.
    In some games where it gets confusing, I find it helpful to consider the game itself.

  • TexAgAaronTexAgAaron Legacy Member
    1723 karma

    @10000019 Thanks. I guess I'm second guessing myself too much on a simple thing. I'll keep my eye on the context a bit more.

  • marcosmcqueenmarcosmcqueen Member
    241 karma

    I also get confused when they use words other than "before" and "after" in what are essentially sequencing games. I essentially find myself converting the words they use into "before" and "after". At best it takes a few extra seconds. At worst, I do it wrong.
    What I've started doing is writing a small key for myself on my master game board. In the above example I'd write "l" to the left of the first slot and "h" to the right of the last slot. Most people are a lot smarter than me and so they probably don't need to do that. I'd just rather not have to remember that or do the conversion in my head.

  • OlamHafuchOlamHafuch Alum Member
    2326 karma

    My worst experience was in a game that has things discovered in the 8th century CE, 9th century CE and 10th century CE, and I mistakenly identified 8th century as the most recent (which would have been true had they been talking about BC). It definitely pays to take a couple of extra seconds to be sure about which way the game pieces flow.

  • tylerdschreur10tylerdschreur10 Alum Member
    1465 karma

    @uhinberg said:
    My worst experience was in a game that has things discovered in the 8th century CE, 9th century CE and 10th century CE, and I mistakenly identified 8th century as the most recent (which would have been true had they been talking about BC). It definitely pays to take a couple of extra seconds to be sure about which way the game pieces flow.

    I remember that game, I probably spent a full minute triple checking and second guessing the proper order of my gameboard!

  • TexAgAaronTexAgAaron Legacy Member
    1723 karma

    Thanks y'all for the responses! I feel absolutely dumb messing up on these rules. I'll second guess myself on something so simple, but the writers are counting on this. I've seen enough games where #1 is considered the highest but it is specifically mentioned and so a game like this I have to pause.

  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma

    @tylerdschreur10 said:

    @uhinberg said:
    My worst experience was in a game that has things discovered in the 8th century CE, 9th century CE and 10th century CE, and I mistakenly identified 8th century as the most recent (which would have been true had they been talking about BC). It definitely pays to take a couple of extra seconds to be sure about which way the game pieces flow.

    I remember that game, I probably spent a full minute triple checking and second guessing the proper order of my gameboard!

    Haha -- I won't spoil it, but I had a similar confusion with this game. Like @uhinberg said, it is definitely worth the extra couple of seconds to understand the games and which way the pieces flow.

  • OlamHafuchOlamHafuch Alum Member
    2326 karma

    @"Alex Divine" @tylerdschreur10 That game definitely shows the evil intentions of the LSAT writers!

  • Pink DustPink Dust Alum Member
    403 karma

    Took PT42. It has similar rule ‘positioned higher’. If you do logic games enough, this won’t trip you up. They do state when they mean 1 is the highest. For example when they have games about ranking. 1 would be “higher”. I think after you have written down your rules, go back and just double check!!! It takes literally couple seconds but can save you so many points!! I got into the habit of doing this.

  • TexAgAaronTexAgAaron Legacy Member
    1723 karma

    @"Pink Dust" Thanks! The more I thought about it, I realized that only in the cases like the one you mentioned are where 1 is the "highest". Otherwise it is the other way around. Just need to remember/trust myself next time on it.

  • tylerdschreur10tylerdschreur10 Alum Member
    1465 karma

    On a related topic. Be cognizant of the way question 1 is ordered. I've had it where I arrange my board from highest to lowest for example, and then the first question is the standard, "which of these is possible" but ordered from lowest to highest. I always check the first question now and organize my board and rules occasionally. It prevents a silly error while mentally inverting all the orders.

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