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When did you ask about LORs?

kimpg_66kimpg_66 Alum Member
in General 1617 karma

Took a class this past semester and I really clicked with the prof. I'm hesitant to email her until next semester begins because I know some professors keep (and deserve to keep) strict, operating-hours only timelines for checking their emails. I don't want to clutter her email and then her lose it in the depth of her inbox.

I'm also hesitant to ask at the very beginning of the semester because it can be so hectic. So is there any particular time that worked best for y'all?

Comments

  • Seeking PerfectionSeeking Perfection Alum Member
    4423 karma

    I asked mid semester. One prof met with me, wrote the letter, and submitted it inside a week.

    The other, who has been my favorite prof, who I am confident likes me, and who I literally had a class with both last semester and next semester as well as twice before, just got it to me yesterday.

    So in hindsight, I would ask early and often just in case they are slow to respond. I would also guess that after about the first week or two they shouldn't be too busy from any class starting things. You probably want to get to them in that sweet spot before they are grading assignments if possible.

    Good luck!

  • EvetteCeeEvetteCee Alum Member
    224 karma

    I would ask at the beginning of the semester because as Seeking Perfection said they're not grading assignments at that time and aren't as busy. This way you also have plenty of time to meet with them during office hours if you'd like.

  • 1000001910000019 Alum Member
    3279 karma

    I'd send an email now asking to arrange a meeting (at the professors convenience) to discuss the LOR. In the mean time, keep a hold of whatever you can from the class

  • kimpg_66kimpg_66 Alum Member
    1617 karma

    Thanks everyone! I'm leaning towards 2ndish week of classes

  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma

    @kimmy_m66 said:
    Took a class this past semester and I really clicked with the prof. I'm hesitant to email her until next semester begins because I know some professors keep (and deserve to keep) strict, operating-hours only timelines for checking their emails. I don't want to clutter her email and then her lose it in the depth of her inbox.

    I'm also hesitant to ask at the very beginning of the semester because it can be so hectic. So is there any particular time that worked best for y'all?

    I asked in the beginning of the semester as well. Both profs I asked responded quickly and had my LOR submitted by October.

  • kimpg_66kimpg_66 Alum Member
    1617 karma

    @"Alex Divine" Yeah that would be ideal. I'm not applying until next year, and said as much in my email, but I'm still giving a deadline of Feb. 28th.

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    I tried to send it during normal hours. It took some courage to hit send, but was so worth it. They find the first month of a semester extremely busy, but are still checking emails and it's good to make the ask once you've written something you're happy with, and your first goal is likely going to be to get on their calendar and then get into the details once they get settled with their classes.

  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma

    @kimmy_m66 said:
    @"Alex Divine" Yeah that would be ideal. I'm not applying until next year, and said as much in my email, but I'm still giving a deadline of Feb. 28th.

    I think still giving a deadline is a good idea. I think I made up an arbitrary one myself, like Oct. 14th. or Oct. 18th., something random to make sure I wasn't going to be waiting indefinitely. One prof had it in within a week and the other took close to 3 weeks. Both were in well before my soft deadline and it worked out well.

    Profs are always going to be busy, but at least in the beginning of the school year there aren't tons of midterms and finals to grade. I think you'll end up in good shape if you ask at the beginning of the semester.

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    So after the email we met about a month later with conversations in between and it worked out well.

  • TheMikeyTheMikey Alum Member
    4196 karma

    I asked more than a year ago (during the summer for a prof who wasn't at my school anymore), and during the semester (for a prof I had the previous semester and that current one I asked during).

    I say go to office hours if possible tbh, it would be much better to be face to face and speak about this than by email. I say go anytime after you get a grade, but like I said, in-person! I felt a much greater connection to the prof I spoke to in-person than the one via email, we spoke about more than just my LOR and it was just great overall and if your prof is as nice as mine was then it will be worth it.

  • goingfor99thgoingfor99th Member
    3072 karma

    Yeah, ask in person unless you have a ton of rapport with whomever you're asking. Professors seems to appreciate the extra effort.

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    And you can bring them something that way, perhaps some postage stamps (even if it's online, they'll probably have some use for them).

  • Hunter JDHunter JD Legacy Member
    16 karma

    Definitely go to office hours as soon as the semester begins, if you can, and talk to them in person. I'd imagine most professors would prefer a face-to-face request, as opposed to an email, due to the added dynamics that come along with an in-person interaction.

    I won't be applying to law schools until Fall 2018, but I spent all last semester lining up my three recommenders and working with them on building up content that would form a neat package when tied in with the final application. It is never too early! The more time you give your recommenders, the less you'll have to worry about any sort of time crunch later on, and the more time there is to refine the content.

    As a side note, I personally had one of my recommenders work with me on revisions of what is now becoming (what I believe to be) a fantastic personal statement. This can give you some upside in the application process, assuming you don't deviate from the original formula of your PS, as most likely they will be able to pull some good details from what you have written yourself, and put their own spin on said details in a manner that will be advantageous to you in the long run.

    There's no concrete rules for the process, by any means, but I would strongly advocate approaching them as soon as possible.

  • goingfor99thgoingfor99th Member
    edited December 2017 3072 karma

    @"Hunter Davila" said:
    As a side note, I personally had one of my recommenders work with me on revisions of what is now becoming (what I believe to be) a fantastic personal statement. This can give you some upside in the application process, assuming you don't deviate from the original formula of your PS, as most likely they will be able to pull some good details from what you have written yourself, and put their own spin on said details in a manner that will be advantageous to you in the long run.

    Yeah, this!

    The professors who wrote my letters of recommendation helped me edit all of my essays. Schools encourage this type of behavior as this is what academia is!!! Professors, doctors, other academic professionals are presumed to be good actors, i.e. acting with integrity in the editing process and not plagiarizing, unless there's reason to think otherwise.

    In law school, you'll be blessed to become a part of a group of friends who work together and share notes and regularly exchange edits. Teamwork is important. A cooperative social dynamic in law school leads to more benefits than I could imagine, I'm sure.

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