LSAC-calculated GPA vs. College GPA, etc. - What matters???

LAWYEREDLAWYERED Alum Member
edited August 2018 in Law School Admissions 335 karma

Hi everyone,

I just checked my LSAC Academic Summary Report and I am very confused.
The LSAC calculated my Degree Summary GPA as a 3.36 and my Cumulative GPA as a 3.41.
In contrast, my university says my Cumulative GPA is a 3.36 and my Cumulative GPA for my major is a 3.56.

Also: I received an F in a P/F GE course I took and it is not being reflected on my LSAC Academic Summary Report (which I REALLY don't mind because it would definitely pull down my LSAC GPA) but I'm just so confused--was it an error?

I guess my question is: which GPA is the one that law schools use to decide whether to admit me or not?
Furthermore, if a law school's average GPA is a 3.57/3.59 (i.e. UCI or UC Davis) and I have a 3.41 GPA, am I still considered a splitter? Will I still need to kill it/ overcompensate on my LSAT? (I'm an URM)
@"David.Busis" I would really love to hear your insight.

Thanks everyone.

Comments

  • akistotleakistotle Member 🍌🍌
    9339 karma

    Hi @LAWYERED,

    What matters is your cumulative undergraduate GPA according to the LSAC. Your LSAC GPA is what schools see.

    If your GPA is below the median, your LSAT score probably needs to be at or above their median. But the URM admissions can be different: https://7sage.com/admissions/lesson/affects-chances-getting-law-school/

  • Tom_TangoTom_Tango Alum Member
    902 karma

    LSAC gpa

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    1777 karma

    Have you transferred schools? I think that's what adjusted mine a little (3.79 to 3.80). Since GPAs are often rounded up, combining the grade points' unrounded numbers from multiple transcripts could change it. Anyway, your LSAC GPA is what matters.

  • Leah M BLeah M B Alum Member
    8392 karma

    As the others said, it is your LSAC calculated cumulative GPA that law schools will look at. From what I gather, they really are not interested in what your degree GPA is. In that case, it sounds like good news! Your LSAC cumulative GPA is higher than what your school calculated. I'd be happy about that. :)

    As far as admissions goes, if you're below median with GPA you'll want an above median LSAT. If you're at 25th or below GPA, you'll want a 75th and above LSAT. You will likely get a little boost for being URM, but it's still best to set your goals like anyone else for the LSAT.

  • LAWYEREDLAWYERED Alum Member
    335 karma

    Thanks everyone!
    @"samantha.ashley92" I had to submit three different transcripts: 1 from my first year of study abroad, 1 from the university I received my degree from and 1 from a community college that I took one summer class at. I received a 4.0 at the community college because I only took one class and I did very well at the French study abroad school so perhaps that pulled up my GPA?

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    1777 karma

    I have multiple as well, including a complete withdrawal from a semester. (I'll need an addendum for that!) So let's say your grade points were 55.5555 from one school and 55.4444 from another school. Separately, they would be counted as such. Combined, however, they total 110.9999. LSAC may round that up to 111.00, while the individual schools did not round up. I could be wrong on that, but that's the only explanation I can think of.

  • David.BusisDavid.Busis Member Moderator Admissions Consultant
    6511 karma

    Yep—your cumulative GPA according to LSAC is the one that matters. Schools will see your degree GPA, which is good, but they have to bake your cumulative GPA into their 509 disclosures.

  • MissChanandlerMissChanandler Alum Member Sage
    3256 karma

    I think that community college class is the explanation! Usually transfers from community college aren't factored into your school's GPA but LSAC does include them

  • LAWYEREDLAWYERED Alum Member
    335 karma

    @MissChanandler said:
    I think that community college class is the explanation! Usually transfers from community college aren't factored into your school's GPA but LSAC does include them

    I wish I had known that! I would've taken a ton of easy summer classes every year.

  • MissChanandlerMissChanandler Alum Member Sage
    3256 karma

    It's nice that it's giving you a boost! I know several kids who took classes they knew they'd do poorly in at a community college so that it wouldn't mess with their gpa, and now it's hurting them in the law school process

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