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Mental Health Help

wwwtttttwwwttttt Monthly Member
edited July 2018 in General 172 karma

Hey guys,
Do you guys have any tips for what to do during times that you feel like you're stuck in a bad place mentally? I have been suffering with my mental health for a while (generalized anxiety disorder and depression). Are there any tips or routines y'all could share with me? I'd love to know what helps you guys out :)

Comments

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    Anxiety runs in my family as well. Morning Meditation tends to help me a lot and a visit every so often to my therapist... he's awesome! (and he does skype calls if you every want his info just inbox me ;-))

  • JustDoItJustDoIt Alum Member
    3112 karma

    See a therapist. Again: SEE A THERAPIST. It was the best thing I ever did for myself. Also, take time for yourself everyday. It can be hard when you are super busy but it's extremely important. Lastly, try to frame negative thoughts positively. It takes a lot of practice but is worth it.

    Feel free to message me anytime!

  • PandaRamenPandaRamen Alum Member
    edited July 2018 162 karma

    Depression and anxiety affects my family and I. I've only seen a therapist once in my life during a VERY low point. I always considered myself someone who wants to learn how to fix things that works for me and not the general scheme of fixing or alleviating mental problems. So hopefully this advice would help you in some way.

    • Understand that youre not alone. It might feel like you are. Your doubts, insecurities, fears etc. are mostly common. Maybe talking to a friend (someone who listens to understand and not to reply) is helpful or a complete stranger. Someone you probably wont see again, I usually solicit advice from old people.

    • Write your feelings. I know this sound cliché - the "Dear Diary" thing. But it does help. I tend to write my negative emotions, secrets, insecurities on a small notebook. It helps relieve my feelings because it felt like I let some burden out on paper. If you are worried about someone snooping around your bedroom, write it on a piece of paper. Really let your feelings out - use profanity, crazy handwriting because of your emotions - stuff like that. Then burn the paper (in a safe fireproof container or backyard grill).

    • Meditate. This is something I have come to learn through out the years of living with anxiety. Meditate with the intention of calming your heart and mind. I use Mala Beads. There's loads of tutorial on how to use them. I follow the rules of keeping the Mala beads "pure". My dad and I are Buddhist. He was the one who taught me how to meditate.

    • Let out a good cry. (I do this A LOT)

    I have a lot more of strategy to either overcome or keep depression and anxiety at bay. You can message me if you want some more advice, or just someone to talk to. You got this!

  • wwwtttttwwwttttt Monthly Member
    172 karma

    @tringo335 said:
    Anxiety runs in my family as well. Morning Meditation tends to help me a lot and a visit every so often to my therapist... he's awesome! (and he does skype calls if you every want his info just inbox me ;-))

    Ah I might take you up on that!!! I've had trouble finding a therapist that's accessible to me because I live an hour away from mine :(

  • wwwtttttwwwttttt Monthly Member
    172 karma

    @JustDoIt said:
    See a therapist. Again: SEE A THERAPIST. It was the best thing I ever did for myself. Also, take time for yourself everyday. It can be hard when you are super busy but it's extremely important. Lastly, try to frame negative thoughts positively. It takes a lot of practice but is worth it.

    Feel free to message me anytime!

    Thank you so much! I have one but I missed some appointments with her (I should have just gone) whenever I was busy with summer classes. It was a mistake to do that :( I will message you for sure :3

    You're right! I get so worried about everything happening with school and money that I forget to take time for myself. I used to have major issues with my negative thoughts and I'd have a mental breakdown at the end of each week lol :/ I need to establish a good self-care routine.

    I appreciate the support :smile:

  • wwwtttttwwwttttt Monthly Member
    172 karma

    @PandaRamen said:
    Depression and anxiety affects my family and I. I've only seen a therapist once in my life during a VERY low point. I always considered myself someone who wants to learn how to fix things that works for me and not the general scheme of fixing or alleviating mental problems. So hopefully this advice would help you in some way.

    • Understand that youre not alone. It might feel like you are. Your doubts, insecurities, fears etc. are mostly common. Maybe talking to a friend (someone who listens to understand and not to reply) is helpful or a complete stranger. Someone you probably wont see again, I usually solicit advice from old people.

    • Write your feelings. I know this sound cliché - the "Dear Diary" thing. But it does help. I tend to write my negative emotions, secrets, insecurities on a small notebook. It helps relieve my feelings because it felt like I let some burden out on paper. If you are worried about someone snooping around your bedroom, write it on a piece of paper. Really let your feelings out - use profanity, crazy handwriting because of your emotions - stuff like that. Then burn the paper (in a safe fireproof container or backyard grill).

    • Meditate. This is something I have come to learn through out the years of living with anxiety. Meditate with the intention of calming your heart and mind. I use Mala Beads. There's loads of tutorial on how to use them. I follow the rules of keeping the Mala beads "pure". My dad and I are Buddhist. He was the one who taught me how to meditate.

    • Let out a good cry. (I do this A LOT)

    I have a lot more of strategy to either overcome or keep depression and anxiety at bay. You can message me if you want some more advice, or just someone to talk to. You got this!

    Ahhh thank you! This community is really supportive, I love it. My family is Buddhist too! I will take all of your tips into consideration and update you on which methods help me :) will update you and everyone else! I haven't cried in so long I probably need to have a good cry smh

    It's really comforting knowing that I'm not alone. That piece of advice really helped, I haven't really seen my friends lately and I think that had something to do with why I'm feeling this way

  • mjmonte17mjmonte17 Alum Member
    757 karma

    Eating a healthy diet, doing some type of exercise every day, getting plenty of sleep, and spending time outside in the sun all help me when I feel mentally off.

  • testfromawaytestfromaway Alum Member
    edited July 2018 280 karma

    Meditation, talking things out with a friend, yoga (at home in pajamas, because on a bad mental health day there is no way I'm leaving the house more than necessary), essential oils in a diffuser, and taking a break from all non-essential human functions (yes, "non-essential" includes taking a break on the LSAT. No, "non-essential" does not mean taking a break on eating and sleeping).

    You are your first priority. You're not going to be a good LSAT studier if you're tearing yourself to shreds in the meantime. Give yourself the time and space to breathe, and talk to someone for help if you need that.

  • jyarmojyarmo Alum Member
    350 karma

    Definitely agree with all this advice, want to add a second voice for meditation, it has been a game changer for me. I have had anxiety / depression issues on and off and meditation has been able to provide me just a bit of space between the feelings and the experience of those feelings (aka - I am not what I feel). I recommend looking up Tara Brach, she has great books and great (many free) guided meditations that can help you be an ally to yourself. The LSAT is such a brutal MF'er and it can be so hard to keep your spirits up when the needle only moves a teeny bit for a while. (Also any book by Pema Chodron.)

    I had a therapist for a bit that utilized EFT/Tapping which can be really helpful to tame intense situations, particularly anxiety. It can seem a little kooky at first but it helped gain focus, overcome negative thoughts, see my goal, etc. (EFT=emotional freedom technique).

    Good luck and stick with it, you are in good anxious company here (haha) and it is doable!

  • niki2018niki2018 Legacy Member
    54 karma

    I had very severe anxiety before starting PTs. I started going to kick boxing classes and after the classes I feel like I can think more clearly! I would say any high intensity aerobic workout class would work.

    Also, I had insomnia so my doctor prescribed a medication to help me sleep better at night.

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    edited July 2018 1777 karma

    I have a crazy amount of anxiety/a few anxiety disorders, along with bipolar disorder (typically depression)... so I totally understand feeling like you're stuck in a bad place. My suggestions:

    1) Therapy. Find someone you like.

    2) Download the app Insight Timer (free) and find a few guided meditations. I by no means consider myself to be a "meditation person", but I found a few that I like. There's one called Believe in Yourself where the guy literally tells you that you can do anything and that you're amazing. I really like listening to that haha. Some people prefer guided imagery meditation (YouTube).

    3) Even if you're super busy, you need to have time to yourself. Giving yourself a mental break will also help with retaining information later (while you're studying), so win-win. Plus, burnout is a bitch.

    4) Work out, even if it's just a little walk. Again, it also helps with cognition.

    5) Write. Journal, write poetry, whatever works for you. It's amazing how much comes out when you put pen to paper-- sometimes even things that you didn't realize were bothering you.

    Feel free to send me a message if you want to talk any more.
    Good luck! You got this!

  • JustDoItJustDoIt Alum Member
    3112 karma

    @winniettran said:
    I appreciate the support :smile:

    Anytime! I get it...I was right where you were too. You just have to remember that you are the most important person in your life and you won't be able to do the things you enjoy if you don't take care of them :)

  • cvaldez74cvaldez74 Legacy Member
    130 karma

    the only new thing I can add is to maybe try gardening. I've read that something happens when your hands are in dirt - maybe a connection with the earth, maybe the ability to mindlessly focus on something else, maybe just being outdoors - that will help to settle a troubled mind. I did a little of this over the past year and it does help when I'm in a depressive funk. even just pulling weeds or tending to a small herb garden helps.

    but I do believe that the best way to see improvements is through the use of therapy (you'll know you have a good therapist when you have one - not all of them are good), a healthy diet, exercise (even just a walk outside), and being outdoors for a period of time.

  • Frank JaegerFrank Jaeger Alum Member
    144 karma

    Maybe try going grain free for a month or go on a lchf diet like Ketogenic. My anxiety/depression is virtually zero after I go through the grain withdrawals. Diet often plays a bigger part in mood than people think. I suffered from social anxiety disorder and gad for years before changing some things. if you watch pornography stop that as well, it f***s up your brain. Check out www.yourbrainonporn.com for a ton of scientific research on the subject.

  • Legally_SpeakingLegally_Speaking Alum Member
    550 karma

    @winniettran
    As mentioned above, I've found semi-regular meditation to be helpful when I feel some anxiety coming on (the app Calm, though a tad on the expensive side, is pretty great) I'm also a regular runner and although I don't run nearly as much as I once did, getting even a 30 minute run in can do wonders. Additionally, writing out your thoughts and/or talking with someone in either a personal or professional role seem like useful approaches as well. Personally, I've found NON-LSAT reading to be a great way to counteract racing thoughts particularly when the subject matter is something I can get "lost in".

  • Leah M BLeah M B Alum Member
    8392 karma

    So much really good advice in here. I second everyone saying therapy. I've been going to counseling for a couple of years and it has been so, so helpful. I really think most people could benefit from it.

    I also want to say, if you aren't taking any medication for it, consider that as well. Talk to a doctor. Sometimes even all the counseling, meditation, etc isn't going to help you out in your toughest spot.

  • wwwtttttwwwttttt Monthly Member
    edited July 2018 172 karma

    @JustDoIt said:

    @winniettran said:
    I appreciate the support :smile:

    Anytime! I get it...I was right where you were too. You just have to remember that you are the most important person in your life and you won't be able to do the things you enjoy if you don't take care of them :)

    I just saw a therapist today! I went to group therapy and broke down in front of everyone lol so my therapist talked to me afterwards. I have another appointment tomorrow. I can't thank everyone enough, especially you! finally gonna start taking care of my emotional well-being:smile:

  • lemmegetuhhhhlemmegetuhhhh Alum Member
    126 karma

    I know diet advice sounds like something that someone with zero experience with depression would advocate for, but I've heard some pretty amazing benefits.

    Take it with a grain of salt, but who knows. Before you totally write it off, that girl has an auto-immune disorder triggered by certain foods (carbs, mostly), manifesting as arthritis and depression. The arthritis was serious enough to require hip and ankle replacements by about age 20, so it was a physical and mental thing. Cutting down to a meat and greens diet cured them both. Couldn't hurt trying. You can google her name for more info if you're interested.

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma

    @testfromaway said:
    Meditation, talking things out with a friend, yoga (at home in pajamas, because on a bad mental health day there is no way I'm leaving the house more than necessary), essential oils in a diffuser, and taking a break from all non-essential human functions (yes, "non-essential" includes taking a break on the LSAT. No, "non-essential" does not mean taking a break on eating and sleeping).

    You are your first priority. You're not going to be a good LSAT studier if you're tearing yourself to shreds in the meantime. Give yourself the time and space to breathe, and talk to someone for help if you need that.

    Yes to the diffuser and essential oils . Specific brands will actually sell relaxation oils . I bought all of them on Amazon through a reputable brand . Also for the calm app I have it but I have the free version from the App Store. Try supplements (I take omega 3 oils and vitamin b complex by Jamison ) . I know they make some for anxiety as well . The fish oil helps with stress inflammation and keeping your brain in shape . Also there is new data sayIng it helps with anxiety / depression

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma

    Also try seeing a massage therapist when I was insured I went for my school related back pain and stress . See how much and how you can get coverage if you already have health insurance

  • wwwtttttwwwttttt Monthly Member
    172 karma

    All of this feedback has been so great, thanks again everyone :)

  • bcallahan95bcallahan95 Alum Member
    64 karma

    The best thing I have done for myself for my anxiety and depression was join betterhelp.com, the therapists are so personalized and always accessible and accommodating. If you're like me and like to get it all out of your head by telling (or writing to) someone then you'd definitely love it too. Good luck with everything!

  • MissChanandlerMissChanandler Alum Member Sage
    3256 karma

    I have suffered from moderate to severe (it varies) anxiety for as long as I can remember. Lots of things provide some relief- therapy, self-care activities, etc., but the only thing that truly made a large/noticeable difference was medication. For years I was reluctant to try it because of the stigma and because I was afraid that it would mean something negative about me, but it made me feel so much better in a matter of weeks and then I was kicking myself for not just trying it earlier. I could have had relief from my anxiety YEARS earlier. Don't be afraid to do everything you need to do to take care of yourself! I hope you are able to find something that helps :)

  • ElleWoods77ElleWoods77 Alum Member
    1184 karma

    I have had anxiety since I was a kid which I have come to find out stems from experiencing alot of trauma . I also have experienced severe depression . Here are the things that have helped me:
    1) Exercise : I am a runner and I notice it is like therapy to me . 30 minutes of exercise can make a huge difference .
    2) Eating Habits: I notice a huge difference from watching
    I eat vs when I ate Chick Fil A everyday . I think clearer and have a much better attitude (after the withdrawals I experienced).
    3) Finding A Solid Support Group: Developing healthy relationships with my family and finding a solid group of girlfriends has been so important . Sometimes you can’t do it alone and you shouldn’t have to feel like you have to. A therapist is great as well.
    4) Staying Away from Negativity : If it is toxic to your well being . Get rid of it . Toxic family members , friends , and jobs (if you can ). I used to work in a toxic environment and it messed me up mentally . Leaving that job is the best thing I did for myself . If someone or something is dragging you down, it is not worth it .
    5) Limiting my Social Media Use: I don’t know about you but I find social media quite negative in this political climate . Sometimes you can find yourself comparing yourself to others . I find it much more productive to read or go outside sometimes . It is easy to get caught up on Facebook and Instagram .
    6) Making sure I get a good nights sleep . The LSAT has not helped my anxiety and I find I have a harder time sleeping . Taking some Luna (a natural sleeping aid), and some hot cocoa has been incredibly helpful .
    7) Self Care Days: Taking a day to do my favorite things is one of the highlights of my week. My self care involves Netflix and a cheat day :).
    I applaud you for seeking help, it is a incredibly brave thing to do. I really wish you all the best with your mental well being .

  • westher008westher008 Alum Member
    37 karma

    I used to have both depression and generalized anxiety, which went away last year. My depression and anxiety never stopped me from performing well in graduate school. However, I saw a psychiatrist, who made me take Abilify for the depression and for psychotic episodes. Being depressed means you have a very realistic grasp of reality, moreso than non-depressed people. Meditating helped a lot for depression. You can also take Xanax to alleviate some symptoms of anxiety.

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    1777 karma

    Hey! How have you been doing?

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