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How to deal with abstract/philosophical topics on morality, etc???

pugloverpuglover Monthly Member
in General 148 karma

When these questions appear, I get really confused and have a hard time interpreting them, because they are so abstract. It feels like the author is trying to say something very all knowing and wise, even on silly subjects, but the language is hard to decode. Especially when morality comes up. Is there a way to train myself to solidify these concepts, or any techniques you can use. Greatly appreciated!

Comments

  • yunonsieyunonsie Alum Member
    611 karma

    RC? LR? Both?

  • JMPlaw19JMPlaw19 Alum Member
    144 karma

    Id say something helpful is to just accept what the author or stim is telling you is moral or not moral as true. If the author says something random like not eating ice cream is morally incorrect, then dont overthink it and try to just use their point of view despite any concepts you have in your head

  • Chris NguyenChris Nguyen Alum Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    4103 karma

    Abstract philosophical stimuli are hard! I recommend coming up with an example to make the abstract concept concrete.

    For example:

    The only justification for one to launder funds from the rich is to distribute such funds evenly to disadvantaged populations.

    Concrete Example: Robin Hood.

    It takes a while to get used to, but it helps me immensely when parsing out abstract concepts. Hope this helps!

  • pugloverpuglover Monthly Member
    148 karma

    @yunonsie said:
    RC? LR? Both?

    Both, but mainly LR.

  • okkkkkkkkkkkokkkkkkkkkkk Monthly Member
    56 karma

    Read about moral philosophy, nothing more to it. They're almost always cookie cutter moral principles.

  • _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Monthly Member
    15 karma

    As a Philosophy major, this, this is the answer. Translate any moral principles into scenarios that are easily understood. After reading it ask yourself: What action are they advocating in what situation? Remember that and don't try to kill yourself over the exact words of the argument. If they ask you to apply that principle to another scenario (which I've found is the case in most of the philosophy stimuli) just try and match the scenario you've thought of in your head to the answers.

    @Christopherr said:
    Abstract philosophical stimuli are hard! I recommend coming up with an example to make the abstract concept concrete.

    For example:

    The only justification for one to launder funds from the rich is to distribute such funds evenly to disadvantaged populations.

    Concrete Example: Robin Hood.

    It takes a while to get used to, but it helps me immensely when parsing out abstract concepts. Hope this helps!

  • pugloverpuglover Monthly Member
    148 karma

    @"_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _" said:
    As a Philosophy major, this, this is the answer. Translate any moral principles into scenarios that are easily understood. After reading it ask yourself: What action are they advocating in what situation? Remember that and don't try to kill yourself over the exact words of the argument. If they ask you to apply that principle to another scenario (which I've found is the case in most of the philosophy stimuli) just try and match the scenario you've thought of in your head to the answers.

    @Christopherr said:
    Abstract philosophical stimuli are hard! I recommend coming up with an example to make the abstract concept concrete.

    For example:

    The only justification for one to launder funds from the rich is to distribute such funds evenly to disadvantaged populations.

    Concrete Example: Robin Hood.

    It takes a while to get used to, but it helps me immensely when parsing out abstract concepts. Hope this helps!

    Thank you!!! I feel like this is a great way to approach it.

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