Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Crying over surprisingly bad 168 LSAT: bother to apply to HYSCC?

HopefullyHLSHopefullyHLS Monthly Member
edited February 3 in Law School Admissions 445 karma

I know this is ridiculous because I've often been the person here who has given advice with regards to such type of questions, but now erroneously I am in the position to ask for it. I would still appreciate your help.

I've been averaging at around 174 among all PT's I've taken, and during the last 5 or so PTs I was able to hit a 180 and a 176. I had the suspicion that there might be an inflation because I had seen the vast majority of the PT's I've done before, however it was 1-1.5 years ago (I basically did non-serious on- and off- studying from late 2019 to May 2020, fully stopped and re-started in May 2021) and I honestly did not consciously remember any (!) of the questions - that feeling got corroborated when I simulated PT91 (100% fresh) on LawHub and scored a 173, which was within the range of my other scores (and honestly, it did not feel different from all other PTs I had taken).

I took the January International LSAT, and it did not feel significantly different from any other PT I've done (I was able to control the increased level of nervousness due to knowing that this is the real LSAT). However, I received my score yesterday which was a 168, and spent the whole day crying and vomiting (I wish I were kidding...). I never scored a 168 since re-starting prep in May (I can send you my personal PT excel file if you do not believe me)...

Before getting my mind clear, registering for June LSAT and using the weekend to think about an action plan, I would like to ask whether it makes sense now to apply to the Law Schools I planned to (these are Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Columbia, University of Chicago - no other schools, for personal reasons).

Things considering rn:

  • I often read here and on reddit that your chances are zero if LSAT is below last year's medians, however e.g. Harvard's 25th percentile score was 170, means that 25% of those admitted scored 170 or lower. Means to me that there is a realistic chance that there were at least some people with my score who got admitted.

  • It's February, admittedly very late, not sure how much of an impact that has (some say marginal, some say chances are 0).

  • Everything is set up for application, I paid here $600 for editing my Personal statement + diversity statement, for both I got verified by the editors that they are ready for submission now.

  • I can apply up to 3 times to each law school, however the thought of the miracle happening and thus not having to deal with LSAT anymore (i.e. getting accepted to one of those schools despite my weak LSAT score) is enticing.

  • No URM, however stellar CV and background interesting enough to write a diversity statement.

  • Bonus question:

After the 10 min break of the LSAT exam, I got another proctor. For some reason, the proctoring system kept calling my screen, there was no button where I could pick up and the new proctor was apparently so unfamiliar with the system that she could not make it stop - and instead of being able to calm down before the 2nd half of the exam, I was forced to listen to this annoying sound.

Furthermore, during the last 2-3 min of my LG section, it showed me that there was a connection issue for 5 sec or so, and suddenly it automatically switched to another window. I spent 30-60 sec yelling at the proctors to either stop the time or bring me back to the exam, when I suddenly realized that the exam window was still open and I was able to switch back to the exam simply with my mouse - I know that I could have realized it earlier/immediately, but, I mean, I was taking a very important exam at that moment...

At the end, I was luckily able to finish the LG questions, however: are these sufficient reasons to make this exam not count towards any limit (e.g. one can take the exam 3x in a testing year, 5x in 5 years and 7x over a lifetime, or sth like that) without being cancelled? This was the 4th time I took the LSAT, one of them though does not count because it was a Flex in summer 2020 (two of the scores are cancelled btw.).

Thanks.

Comments

  • HopefullyHLSHopefullyHLS Monthly Member
    445 karma

    Anyone?

  • spedersenspedersen Alum Member
    edited February 4 58 karma

    Sorry to hear about what you went through. I got similar goals and it took a long time before I was able to finish this test in January, so I empathize with you.
    Have you filed a complaint about your test?

    As for your application, I would not apply this cycle. I myself am not, knowing that it'll be WL at best given that I'm applying really close to the deadline. If you can gather yourself to retake in April, I would. It should be plenty of time to diagnose your issues.

  • canihazJDcanihazJD Alum Member Sage
    7950 karma

    I would like to ask whether it makes sense now to apply to the Law Schools I planned to (these are Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Columbia, University of Chicago - no other schools, for personal reasons).

    People get into school below median every year at every school. Be realistic about your chances... keep studying and prepare to reapply, but shoot your shot. The only thing you lose is the app fee.

    It's February, admittedly very late, not sure how much of an impact that has (some say marginal, some say chances are 0).

    It will have an impact, but not an insurmountable one. Depends on the school, cycle, and your app. I was a February applicant and did fine.

    I can apply up to 3 times to each law school

    Says who? The schools? Regardless if you base your application timeline on your scoring, I doubt you'd need three cycles.

    are these sufficient reasons to make this exam not count towards any limit

    Unlikely but ask LSAC directly. They typically count each time you actually see the material as a take.

  • HopefullyHLSHopefullyHLS Monthly Member
    edited February 6 445 karma

    Many thanks for your response, really appreciated!

    @canihazJD said:

    I would like to ask whether it makes sense now to apply to the Law Schools I planned to (these are Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Columbia, University of Chicago - no other schools, for personal reasons).

    People get into school below median every year at every school. Be realistic about your chances... keep studying and prepare to reapply, but shoot your shot. The only thing you lose is the app fee.

    It's February, admittedly very late, not sure how much of an impact that has (some say marginal, some say chances are 0).

    It will have an impact, but not an insurmountable one. Depends on the school, cycle, and your app. I was a February applicant and did fine.

    Even in the schools I am going to apply?

    @canihazJD said:

    I can apply up to 3 times to each law school

    Says who? The schools? Regardless if you base your application timeline on your scoring, I doubt you'd need three cycles.

    For example Harvard: https://hls.harvard.edu/dept/jdadmissions/apply-to-harvard-law-school/the-application-process/admissions-faq/#:~:text=Applicants who wish to reapply,not necessary but welcome, nonetheless.

    "Applicants may apply for admission to Harvard Law School through the regular J.D. application no more than three times. Applications submitted via the Junior Deferral Program (JDP) and the J.D. Transfer pathways do not count towards this cap. Ineligible candidates who submit an application will not be considered for admission and will not receive an application fee reimbursement."

    I admittedly could not find any related information for the other law schools.

    Do you still think I should shoot my shot? I am not a URM candidate, but got feedback that I have a stellar CV, and my personal & diversity statement are both set up (edited in 2 rounds by 7sage editors).

    @canihazJD said:
    Unlikely but ask LSAC directly. They typically count each time you actually see the material as a take.

    In the meantime I figured out that I can only submit a complaint up to 3 days after taking the exam. And I was so confident in my performance that I felt no need to do that... shame on me, I know...

  • jimjim1212jimjim1212 Alum Member
    24 karma

    168 is not bad but you will absolutely need a GPA that is above median if you would like to get into those schools.

  • canihazJDcanihazJD Alum Member Sage
    edited February 8 7950 karma

    I mean always follow the schools instructions. If HLS caps you at three I wouldn't go slinging apps at them hoping to miracle yourself in. If your app is strong besides the LSAT score, I guess my question is why not just improve your score and make it strong all round? I know we all feel compelled to start as soon as possible, but you're really doing yourself a disservice applying before you've reasonably maxed your LSAT potential.

    That said, I know people with 168s or lower at most of schools you mentioned. Most have stellar resumes/experiences though. I think its also reasonable to shoot your shot once but assume you'll have to R&R.

    And yes, people get in below median at literally every school... like that's how you get a median. You can see data albeit skewed on LSD or LSN. @HopefullyHLS

  • Mike_RossMike_Ross Monthly Member Sage
    2851 karma

    Hey there, sorry to hear about your tax day troubles. I think the question you need to ask yourself is whether your application is strong enough to overcome the 168 score for HLS. Like others have mentioned above, people who get in below medians tend to have great application factors. For example: I dont know of many KJDs at HLS with below median scores, but do know of many non traditional students with great backgrounds who got in with below median scores.

    Moreover, you should consider that if you shoot your shot and don't get in, you will likely have to reapply with updated/new essays in the future. All that is to say: if you really like your application materials and have a firm understanding of your admissions chances at the moment, perhaps the best thing to do is wait until you get your target score and apply with better chances in the next cycle.

  • HopefullyHLSHopefullyHLS Monthly Member
    445 karma

    Thanks all for your responses! I decided in the meantime not to apply for this cycle, figure out my test day performance issues evtl. with the help of a tutor, retake the LSAT and apply next cycle.

    Take care!

Sign In or Register to comment.