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To take or not to take

kat_bustamantekat_bustamante Alum Member
edited May 2016 in June 2016 LSAT 32 karma
Hi guys.

This is my first post and I was hoping I could get some feedback as the June 2016 exam is approaching.

My background: I've take the LSAT officially three times. Yes, I know. The first two times were December 2013 and February 2014, both soon after I graduated college in May of 2013 and I was desperate to start law school right away. I took a course and just wasn't prepared. I held off and took the June 2015 exam and didn't do any better even after so much studying so I decided to put it off again for the following year.

Now, I've been studying for this upcoming exam for about six months and finally got my score into the mid 150s; my goal is 160. One day it just clicked and I became super motivated to simply practice and perfect the last few areas I could to attain my desired score. I was even able to figure out how to get a higher score than 160. However, I took an exam a few days ago and scored 147. Granted I was tired from a long day of work and days of studying but this has completely killed my motivation.

I've put this exam off way too many times I simply want to get it over. Putting this exam off for October will delay starting school for another full year.

So my question is, should I take this exam in June as planned being as though I am so near by desired score and if so, how do I regain my confidence?

Thanks to everyone who took the time to read and to those who take the time to reply. Best of luck!

Comments

  • MrSamIamMrSamIam Legacy Inactive ⭐
    2086 karma
    Take another practice test, under optimal but realistic conditions and see how you do. In other words, take a PT on your day off, at around 12, in a quiet room.
    You would be hard-pressed to find a 7Sager who would recommend taking the test before you're ready.
    As a rule of thumb, your timeline should look like this (in chronological order, from left to right)
    Pick target schools --> Find the one with the highest LSAT requirement --> Aim to score that high --> Drill/study --> PT --> Achieve your target score or higher (or even slightly lower) at least 7 times --> Register for upcoming LSAT.
  • Nicole HopkinsNicole Hopkins Alum Inactive Sage Inactive ⭐
    edited May 2016 4344 karma
    This is your fourth take. You're already on sort of shaky ground with 4 takes. If you're going to take it a fourth time, ONLY take it when you're 100% ready. There will not be an opportunity after this for another 5 years, once your scores are all expired.

    [Note: I have never, ever, heard of someone taking a 5th time. Nor have I known anyone who took 4 times, let alone anyone who took 4 times and got into a T14. Or HYS, for that matter—rumor is that AdComms do not look kindly on a 4th take. Consult individual schools of interest and/or consultants to get the official word on perception of 4th takes, let alone 5th takes or beyond.]
  • 7sagelsatstudent1807sagelsatstudent180 Legacy Member
    edited May 2016 926 karma
    You can take 3 times in a 2 year period and that is the only restriction.You do not have to wait 5 years for all of your scores to expire as mentioned above. I too will have taken the LSAT 4+ times so I speak from experience (other people have 4+ takes with a couple coming from lsat prep founders with multiple perfect scores each respectively ). Personally, I will be attending a highly ranked school with a massive scholarship off the strength of my 3rd take but I keep retaking to see if I can possibly reach a score that is Harvard or Stanford worthy. I'm completely happy with my current score and school choice but I want to maximize my scholarships and value to each school. Of course don't be silly and waste takes. But if you feel ready then fire away!

    [I had 3 takes when I submitted apps and had more than 1 t-14 acceptance. I will enter with at least 4 takes. I took the LSAT when I was in college. I waited a few years after college and took a few more times. Although it's not ideal (I wish I got a 170 my first time and lived happily ever after) that's how life works sometimes. Honestly if your your gpa and highest LSAT is over the median of your top choice and your essays are solid, you will likely be accepted. The amount of takes does not matter anymore because schools really only care about your highest score.]
  • Nicole HopkinsNicole Hopkins Alum Inactive Sage Inactive ⭐
    edited May 2016 4344 karma
    @7sagelsatstudent180 said:
    You do not have to wait 5 years for all of your scores to expire as mentioned above.
    In order to avoid the more than 3 takes on the record issue, yes, she would have to wait 5 years for all of them to go away and get a clean slate.
  • Jonathan WangJonathan Wang Yearly Sage
    6432 karma
    You mentioned that post-undergrad, you were desperate to start law school right away and so you took the test even though you knew you weren't ready. You acknowledge that it was ill-conceived and the result was predictable.

    So, the million-dollar question: how is that any different from what you're doing now?
  • 7sagelsatstudent1807sagelsatstudent180 Legacy Member
    edited May 2016 926 karma
    .
  • Nicole HopkinsNicole Hopkins Alum Inactive Sage Inactive ⭐
    4344 karma
    @"Jonathan Wang" said:
    So, the million-dollar question: how is that any different from what you're doing now?
    image
  • kat_bustamantekat_bustamante Alum Member
    32 karma
    Thank you guys for the feedback. I will highly consider putting this exam off.
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