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Low GPA and Low LSAT?

Here's my situation:

I've wanted to go to law school every since I was little. All of my life, things came easy to me, which is not necessarily a good thing. I got into IU and decided socializing and making friends was more important than spending the extra time I had studying, which I know is no excuse at all. I had one completely awful semester not because I wasn't trying, but because I had mono. I got a 2.0 that semester. It took me two years into my undergrad to realize I actually had to put more effort in if I wanted to have a decent GPA. Too little too late, I ended up with a 2.75. On a bright note, my GPA increasingly got better each and every semester.

Now, I took the LSAT last Dec. 2015, and did bad. I "studied" but not really because I was also taking classes at the time. I ended up with a 142. I decided to wait to apply to law school and work full time to build my resume. Fast forward to this Dec. 2016 LSAT. I feel more confident in how I did, but I truly won't know until the score comes back. I studied but probably not as much as I should have and my PT score was averaging 156. I think if I focused the next two months and took for my third and final time in February, I could do even better than that. What does anyone think about taking the LSAT for a third time? Does putting my application in that late make my chances drop even more than what they already are at?

With that being said, I have two previous professor's writing excellent recommendations for me. I am working with one of them on my personal statement and addendum's.

Obviously I know I'm not someone law school's want to admit because of my low GPA and low LSAT score, but my uGPA is not indicative of my ability whatsoever. I touch a bit on this in my personal statement/addendum. I want to stay in state, go to Indiana University, or it's sister school IUPUI McKinney Law.

I guess my question is: should I even continue applying? Will law school's take a chance? This is something I so badly want, but know it may be far fetched to think I'll get accepted... Any advice or insight will be helpful.

Thanks!

Comments

  • rachie_rednograchie_rednog Member
    18 karma
    Also something to add regarding my GPA - I was someone who had to work basically full time my sophomore thru senior year, and I was a Resident Assistant balancing 56 residents in a dorm and being available to them at all hours and that was my best semester for grades.
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @"rachie_rednog" said:
    What does anyone think about taking the LSAT for a third time? Does putting my application in that late make my chances drop even more than what they already are at?
    I think you should take the LSAT a third time if you want to go to law school. However, I truly think if you really want to be a lawyer, you should be prudent and delay gratification, and study until your PT average is way higher. You have a lower GPA and only a high LSAT score is going to help schools see you potential! LOR are important as are addenda, but it's all really a numbers game. Don't beat yourself up about your uGPA because the LSAT counts for wayyyy more anyway. In a way, you have a second chance to show your true potential!
    @"rachie_rednog" said:
    I guess my question is: should I even continue applying? Will law school's take a chance? This is something I so badly want, but know it may be far fetched to think I'll get accepted... Any advice or insight will be helpful.

    Thanks!
    I wouldn't continue applying this cycle. Why rush to take in Feb? It seems like you know you have the potential to do better... Also, you think it's a far fetch you'll get accepted anyway. That's probably true with your projected numbers, so don't waste your 3rd and final take.

    The most important thing 7Sage has taught me (aside from the amazing course) is you have to decide between a goal score and a goal date. My goal score is a 174 and my date is whenever the hell I'm confident I can score that on test day. Barack Obama didn't start law school until he was almost 28... I got a few years and I'm guessing you do too, haha.

    You increase from 142 to 156 tells me that you are an extremely capable person when you put your mind to it. A 12 point increase is incredible so keep going! :)
  • bbutlerbbutler Legacy Inactive ⭐
    401 karma
    @rachie_rednog I agree 100% with @"Alex Divine" the one thing that you can't change is your GPA right now but if you truly want to go to law school then absolutely make the 3rd try on the LSAT count whether that be in February, June, or even September you can make it work out.

    I know in this situation it's tough to be able to think about the things that are working for you but you do have some things to your advantage by applying next cycle and retaking.

    1) Upward Trending GPA: You can be able to write an addendum and the fact that you have faculty that will talk about your character and you as a student can really help offset that.
    2) Applying Early and showing interest to the schools that you want: The LSAT is a beast and the application process is difficult but by waiting until next cycle you have time to be able to get in contact with schools, visit them in person, and put a face to a name so that way you can increase your chances of getting in. But by waiting until next cycle and knocking out a killer LSAT score anything is possible! Law school will be there for you, it isn't going anywhere!
    3) A Great LSAT Score: Even with your GPA if you were to knock out a ridiculous LSAT score then you'd be a splitter and any leverage that you can have to show schools that you're ready to take that next step is going to be huge. As for taking it 3 times it's okay the highest score is the only one that matters who knows even if you have to wait until September to take it but have the rest of your application done and apply with a mid 160's LSAT score you might be able to get in with a potential scholarship!

    The main point is that if you want to go to law school there is nothing stopping you from going to those schools that you listed except a killer LSAT score. It is your life-saver right now so definitely take some time, knock it out and put together a killer application!
  • rachie_rednograchie_rednog Member
    18 karma
    @bbutler and @"Alex Divine" Thank you so much for your insight! It is extremely helpful!

    A question for either of you or any one who might know: Because I've asked for LOR's this cycle, will those stay in my LSAC account for next application cycle for Fall 2018? I fear if I stop the applications, those LOR's will be lost or I'll have to ask for them again (which I hope not because I don't want to be annoying or a nuance..)
  • bbutlerbbutler Legacy Inactive ⭐
    401 karma
    @rachie_rednog I believe they stay in your LSAC profile but I'm not 100% sure about that
  • loosekanenloosekanen Alum Member
    138 karma
    The issue I'm finding that resonates the most with smart individuals is the reconciliation between potential debt vs placement and the bimodal structure of the law market related to salary. With that said, I would advise you to at least have one of those two things covered if you are not getting into a school that puts you on the positive side of that equation. If you have the right connections to guarantee a good, steady, paying job or if you have the money to go to law school free of charge then I say go for it no matter what. You've essentially eliminated the greatest concern. I would not, however, stake my future on a law school with a 65% placement rate that only puts 5% of its graduates in the upper tier of the bimodal distribution if I was taking on any significant debt.
    I'm not you so this is just one idiot's opinion. But I would do a budget breakdown and compare your needs with the ABA/NALP standings of any law school you would elect to attend. It may open your eyes a bit as to what would be required to succeed after your education.
    And in all circumstances you should take the test a third time if you can afford it.
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @"rachie_rednog" said:
    @"Alex Divine" Thank you so much for your insight! It is extremely helpful!

    A question for either of you or any one who might know: Because I've asked for LOR's this cycle, will those stay in my LSAC account for next application cycle for Fall 2018? I fear if I stop the applications, those LOR's will be lost or I'll have to ask for them again (which I hope not because I don't want to be annoying or a nuance..)
    No problem! Yes, the LOR will stay for 5 years I believe.
  • 48 karma

    I suggest you try to hit a 175+. Target T 30 Law Schools. Blanket T14 like Northwestern as well. If you get into NW well and fine, if you are waitlisted you can use that as bargaining to get into some T30 or T40 law schools. All the best.

  • 48 karma

    I am a prospective super splitter as well. May the force be with you.

This discussion has been closed.