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Arguments

Regarding whether other people's argument and conclusion can be used to answer a question(not the author’s) if the author himself did not provide an argument? Since in one lesson, JY said that other people's argument is distinct from the author's argument. So if the author himself just cites other researchers' arguments and conclusions can we use those to answer the questions?

Comments

  • OhnoeshalpmeOhnoeshalpme Alum Member
    2531 karma

    I don't understand what you're asking. It would be helpful if you rephrased the question :)

  • @Ohnoeshalpme in the intro to arguments lesson, JY said that we have to be able to distinguish between the author’s argument and an argument of someone else presented by the author. Now if the author doesn’t provide his/her argument and just cites another person’s argument and conclusion can we use those to answer questions??

  • akistotleakistotle Member 🍌🍌
    9372 karma

    @levonm7 said:
    Regarding whether other people's argument and conclusion can be used to answer a question(not the author’s) if the author himself did not provide an argument? Since in one lesson, JY said that other people's argument is distinct from the author's argument. So if the author himself just cites other researchers' arguments and conclusions can we use those to answer the questions?

    I'm not sure what you're asking either, but I think I understand what you're asking. Sorry if I don't! 😅

    I rephrased the first sentence to "Can other people's argument and conclusion be used to answer a question if the author himself did not provide an argument?" The answer is yes. If the author does not present an argument but the stimulus contains other people’s argument, the question will only deal with other people’s argument.

    The reason why the first lessons in the course dismissed arguments that are not the author’s is because they are contexts that are often irrelevant to answering the question being asked.

    For example, if a stimulus said:

    [Other people's argument]. However, [the author's argument]

    The argument in the stimulus is [the author's argument], and [Other people's argument] is the context. If the questions asks you to strengthen the argument, you will strengthen [the author's argument] because that is the argument of the stimulus.

  • @akistotle Thank you so much for clarifying that.

  • lawgikallawgikal Core Member
    edited January 2019 108 karma

    @levonm7 are you talking about question 4 in 'Quiz – Advanced Premise & Conclusion Identification 1'? I could not see what the author's argument was - I only saw the argument of state researchers.

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