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Will I get in?

DaileyReviewDaileyReview Member
edited October 2016 in Law School Admissions 18 karma
So my top choice for law school is UBC, and I have a GPA on par with their requirements (83%). But my LSAT score is a 10 points below what they say they have as their 'average' for the previous year. Should I even apply? Or simply wait and plan to re-write? Do I have a chance?

Comments

  • StopLawyingStopLawying Alum Member
    821 karma
    Nope, you have to retake. Good luck
  • DaileyReviewDaileyReview Member
    18 karma
    Should I try to push myself for Feb or wait an entire cycle do you think?
  • StopLawyingStopLawying Alum Member
    821 karma
    Study hard and wait another cycle, you'll end up being so much happier! Higher score changes everything
  • GoLSATGoGoLSATGo Alum Member
    84 karma
    @StopLawying i agree with you 100%.

    September was my second take after scoring well below my target score on the October 2015 test and one entire year does wonders for you.

    While some of my friends went on to law school, and admittedly it was painful watching them start classes while I was still slogging through the LSAT material, I took the year to slowly absorb the LSAT leading to a 13 point jump on the September test. I think the fact that I also had a full time job helped me recalibrate my study habits.

    I say you should still apply - give it a shot because your other factors might outweigh your LSAT score if UBC looks at your application holistically. Write the LSAT when you start to consistently score near your target. If that happens by February, great! If not, you will have ample time to increase your score by next June/September/December (whenever you decide to write for next cycle consideration).
  • DaileyReviewDaileyReview Member
    18 karma
    @GoLSATGo thanks for the advice!! I'm really unsure of my chances for this cycle, but I guess I won't know if I could get in unless I try! I feel that other than this score I am a competitive applicant so I'm honestly really disappointed. While you were re-studying did you find it difficult to have a full time job? I'm looking at the next year being like: wow if the LSAT is all I have to focus on I'll be really bored, but at the same time don't want to fill up all my time.
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @zephik_94

    Don't bother applying 10 points below their median. Even if you get accepted by some miracle, you'll likely be paying sticker. And if a school accepts you 10 points below median, this likely isn't a school you want to attend (Barring some insane soft! lol)

    I work full-time and have been prepping since July. I just make sure to set aside 4-5 hours per night to prep and 8 hours on Saturdays. It takes dedication, but there is no question that it will all be worth it.
  • DaileyReviewDaileyReview Member
    18 karma
    @"Alex Divine" Thanks for the advice! I'm really feeling unsure so this is extremely helpful. What does 'paying sticker' mean?

    I've been like going through crisis and re-evaluating all my life decisions and so I guess re-taking it and working hard is what it'll take and I have to just keep at it.
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @zephik_94

    No problem, brother!

    Paying sticker = paying full price to attend law school. Generally speaking you want to get a scholarship where possible. As a rule of thumb, unless you have rich parents, I would suggest against attending ANY top 6 school at sticker. (arguably T14, but even debatable)

    It is always easier to work hard and get a good LSAT score than it is to find a high paying law job and work it long enough to repay a massive debt!

    More time to prep will only allow you more time to consider your choices! I know it is disappointing, but you must have a fairly high GPA, so that tells me you are more than capable of an amazing LSAT score with hard work, good habits, and diligence. If you truly want to be an attorney, don't give up!
  • GodlyOneGodlyOne Alum Member
    76 karma
    These are all very good advice!
  • GoLSATGoGoLSATGo Alum Member
    84 karma
    @DaileyReview It was difficult in the sense that I had less time to study than someone who was only working part-time or did not have a job at all, but my job isn't mentally draining so with the little time I did have after work, I was able to concentrate. Every Saturday was my PT day, and I only focused on around 7 questions each night during the week. This arrangement worked well for me.

    Good luck!
  • Rigid DesignatorRigid Designator Alum Member
    edited October 2016 1086 karma
    @"Alex Divine" mind me asking you to expand on this?
    @"Alex Divine" said:
    As a rule of thumb, unless you have rich parents, I would suggest against attending ANY top 6 school at sticker. (arguably T14, but even debatable)
    Maybe there's something I'm missing or misunderstanding, but wouldn't the top 6 be the exact places where (generally speaking) you'd be willing to pay sticker, since the better the school the better the job prospects? Why would one consider paying sticker at a T14 but not a top 6?
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    edited October 2016 23929 karma
    @jacob.seeley said:
    Maybe there's something I'm missing or misunderstanding, but wouldn't the top 6 be the exact places where (generally speaking) you'd be willing to pay sticker, since the better the school the better the job prospects? Why would one consider paying sticker at a T14 but not a top 6?

    Yeah, so, I'm totally biased and heavily debt adverse with respect to law school. I don't think paying sticker anywhere is a prudent choice, outside of HYS, where merit aid doesn't exist and it is needed based, so there are exceptions for sure.

    I work at a place with quite a few big law refugees that went to top schools. (a lot of Columbia and NYU grads because of location) People often plan to attend top law schools with plans to obtain a big law position without really knowing what the hell being a corporate lawyer entails and requires from someone. More times than not an associate at a big law firm is gone by year 4, pushed out by the up and out lockstep system at these firms and very often by choice to move into another position that likely pays way less. The others are trapped by golden handcuffs in a job they hate.

    In those 3-4 years, likely you haven't paid off your debt. It seems easy enough with 180k, but cost of living in NYC is VERY expensive, trust me on that. After taxes and rent, you'll feel like a blue collar worker even with 180k. Just for some context, NYU at sticker comes in at just around $300,000. Interest isn't that high on student loans, but it is enough on such a big amount you'll feel it in your wallet.

    The thing is with good grades and a good LSAT you can usually get a good scholarship. People with 173 and 3.7+ get half scholarships to Columbia and NYU all the time. And likely if you can get a scholarship at a T6 you should have some options in the lower T14 that are even better.

    Like I said, I think the right thing to do is to study hard for the LSAT and make sure you have good undergraduate grades. It is a lot easier to put in the 9 months or however long it takes to get a good LSAT now than to spend 9 years living like a college student in NYC to pay back over a quarter of a million in debt. Again, I'm very biased about this, but that is because I've seen first hand what 250k+ of debt in NYC looks like.
  • 99 karma
    @"Alex Divine" Do you have nay idea if the NYU scholarships need to be applied to together with the application, or if you only apply once you're admitted
  • Cant Get RightCant Get Right Yearly Member Sage Tutor 🍌
    24733 karma
    @"always learning" said:
    Do you have nay idea if the NYU scholarships need to be applied to together with the application, or if you only apply once you're admitted
    They must be applied for with your application.
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @"always learning" said:
    @"Alex Divine" Do you have nay idea if the NYU scholarships need to be applied to together with the application, or if you only apply once you're admitted
    @"Cant Get Right" said:
    They must be applied for with your application.
    Yup. Have to apply with your application. Make sure to apply to all of NYU's great scholarships. There are a TON at NYU!
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