Our mission is to make legal education accessible

The LSAT is the gateway to the legal profession, and thus it is the gateway to key positions in our society. But those who are unable to hire $150/hr tutors, or take $1000 LSAT prep courses have been at an unfair disadvantage. Until now.

We want to level the playing field. Top-notch, high-quality LSAT instruction should be affordable, and we have worked hard to do just that. We started off releasing free explanations of LSAT questions, aiming to explain every single one, but it wasn't long before copyright lawyers crashed the party. They demanded a licensing fee and electronic protections every time we show an LSAT question. So, while we have to charge for access, the goal has always been, and will continue to be, to liberate legal education.

  • This is why we released hundreds of our videos, including every LSAT Logic Games explanation, for free for nearly eight years until LSAC stopped us.
  • This is why we donate our entire curriculum to PreProBono students.
  • This is why we offer our course for dramatically less than every other major company we know of.

We make LSAT preparation easier and more affordable, so that you can go to law school and become a lawyer.


  • J.Y. Ping

    J.Y. Ping

    Partner

    J.Y. is an educator figuring out ways to bring down the cost of education while improving its quality and accessibility. “This is how we liberate and democratize education!” he likes to say to himself. He says a lot of things to himself. Not all of it makes sense.

    J.Y. graduated from Columbia University where he studied Economics, Political Science, and Philosophy and holds a JD from Harvard Law School. Before finding his calling in education, J.Y. pretended to be a lawyer at Paul, Weiss in Hong Kong and at Davis Polk in NYC.

    J.Y. is also a founder at PreProBono, a 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to helping poor and minority students get into law school and promoting public interest law.

  • Alan Cheuk

    Alan Cheuk

    Partner

    Alan is from Canada, where he received a BSc with a joint major in Computing Science, and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry from Simon Fraser University. He graduated first in his class, in Computing Science. He also received a JD from Harvard Law School.

    Alan taught International Negotiation at Jindal Global Law School and was a Sumner Redstone Fellow in New Delhi for a year after law school. He was justifiably appalled by the lack of good ramen restaurants in New Delhi.

    Alan’s interests and work experience have focused on access to justice and information. He has worked for the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative in India, the Justice and Peace Commission in Liberia, and the Berkman Center.