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Can someone explain the 7sage one edit vs the 7sage unlimited edit

_oshun1__oshun1_ Alum Member

One edit:
One edit of an essay or résumé.
You’ll get a comprehensive critique, detail-oriented suggestions, a language edit, and/or a proofread as necessary.

Unlimited edit:
Unlimited editing for a single essay or résumé.
Help with every stage of the writing process.

I'm confused how "one edit" would work...so I might be paying $184 and end up just getting a spellcheck?

Comments

  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma

    @"surfy surf" said:
    One edit:
    One edit of an essay or résumé.
    You’ll get a comprehensive critique, detail-oriented suggestions, a language edit, and/or a proofread as necessary.

    Unlimited edit:
    Unlimited editing for a single essay or résumé.
    Help with every stage of the writing process.

    I'm confused how "one edit" would work...so I might be paying $184 and end up just getting a spellcheck?

    The "one edit" is a detailed assessment that delves into all elements of your PS. Way more than a spell check!

    @"David.Busis" can give you more details!

  • David.BusisDavid.Busis Member Moderator Admissions Consultant
    6828 karma

    @"surfy surf" @"Alex Divine" Edit Once entails a critique of your essay. We typically begin by telling you what’s working well, then do a reverse outline, then discuss any problems we see, beginning with structural issues and funneling down to more narrow concerns. Finally, we offer you suggestions of how to make it better. We try to prioritize our feedback and sometimes leave out the minor concerns, because (1) we don’t want to overwhelm you, and (2) we honestly believe that nobody, including me and our editors, can really process more than two or three comments about a piece of writing. So we prefer quality feedback over quantity.

    Sometimes we also offer margin notes or direct edits of your language, but we don’t do this for all essays. This isn’t because we’re stingy sometimes and generous other times—it’s because some essays call for margin notes or language edits, and others don’t.

    What am I talking about? Let’s say that you write an essay that just rehashes your résumé. In that case, we’ll tell you, as constructively as possible, that you probably need to rethink your topic, and we’ll suggest X, Y, and Z, based on the essay. But we won’t mark up the document or change the language, because that would only make it harder for you to part with paragraphs that probably need to be left on the cutting-room floor.

    Hope that helps! Let me know if you have other questins.

  • 1000001910000019 Alum Member
    edited November 2017 3279 karma

    @"David.Busis" said:
    @"surfy surf" @"Alex Divine" Edit Once entails a critique of your essay. We typically begin by telling you what’s working well, then do a reverse outline, then discuss any problems we see, beginning with structural issues and funneling down to more narrow concerns. Finally, we offer you suggestions of how to make it better. We try to prioritize our feedback and sometimes leave out the minor concerns, because (1) we don’t want to overwhelm you, and (2) we honestly believe that nobody, including me and our editors, can really process more than two or three comments about a piece of writing. So we prefer quality feedback over quantity.

    Sometimes we also offer margin notes or direct edits of your language, but we don’t do this for all essays. This isn’t because we’re stingy sometimes and generous other times—it’s because some essays call for margin notes or language edits, and others don’t.

    What am I talking about? Let’s say that you write an essay that just rehashes your résumé. In that case, we’ll tell you, as constructively as possible, that you probably need to rethink your topic, and we’ll suggest X, Y, and Z, based on the essay. But we won’t mark up the document or change the language, because that would only make it harder for you to part with paragraphs that probably need to be left on the cutting-room floor.

    Hope that helps! Let me know if you have other questins.

    Hi @"David.Busis"

    Thanks for the information. I have a follow up question. Is it okay to attach notes in the margins or attach a list of questions/concerns? I am considering getting the 1 critique after the December LSAT, and wanted to know if I can attach some questions/concerns I have about the personal statement.

  • David.BusisDavid.Busis Member Moderator Admissions Consultant
    6828 karma

    @10000019 absolutely! Occasionally, though, our responses will obviate the need to respond to your questions. If, for example, you ask about the word choice of a sentence that we think doesn’t belong in the essay, we may speak to the bigger issue and ignore the smaller one.

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