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Anyone else experience this or feel this way?

sbc.mom_3xsbc.mom_3x Alum Member
edited January 2018 in General 1501 karma

This is sort of random. I'm not exactly superstitious. I do strongly believe in the power of mind control and know that mindset plays a powerful role in the LSAT. Also, I know confidence is important. So, this happens to me, and I'm wondering if to anyone else. For instance in LG fool-proofing. I get on a roll where I'm doing fantastic. I'm getting -0 and under JY's recommended time. Then I feel great, I mean I feel great. Then, shortly thereafter, I'll screw up. And I think it's my confidence that gets in the way. I screw up and then curse myself. But then, once I have that awful feeling of sucking, I do better again. But, the happy feeling feels much better than does the discouraging feeling. It's like the discouraging feeling helps me to pay more attention to the rules. Being on cloud 9 has my judgment cloudy. How do I level this playing field for myself? Do I need to go into my test feeling like shit and doubting myself in order to do well? That does not sound like the type of mindset anyone would suggest... * sigh *

Comments

  • Jonathan WangJonathan Wang Yearly Sage Tutor
    edited January 2018 5930 karma

    You get overconfident, then underconfident. It's not a question of feeling like shit about yourself going into test day necessarily, it's a question of properly calibrating your mental state so you're not swinging wildly up and down like the stock market based on how you think you did in the last few questions. You need to find the middle ground where you're confidently executing your mechanics at all time, but still giving it the level of care and attention necessary to not make careless or otherwise unprincipled mistakes.

    I harp on my students regularly about consistency of process and maintenance of focus. Everyone gets there a little bit differently, but the answer you seek lies somewhere in that sphere.

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma

    @"Jonathan Wang" said:
    You get overconfident, then underconfident. It's not a question of feeling like shit about yourself going into test day necessarily, it's a question of properly calibrating your mental state so you're not swinging wildly up and down like the stock market based on how you think you did in the last few questions. You need to find the middle ground where you're confidently executing your mechanics at all time, but still giving it the level of care and attention necessary to not make careless or otherwise unprincipled mistakes.

    I harp on my students regularly about consistency of process and maintenance of focus. Everyone gets there a little bit differently, but the answer you seek lies somewhere in that sphere.

    How do you work on this skill ?

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