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Need Help/Advice for LR

pugloverpuglover Monthly Member

Hello everyone! I am in need of some insight into how to do better on the LR section of the exam. It seems to not yet be "clicking" for me on LR, but I have seen some improvement. It's the harder question types that confuse me. I usually choose the trap answers for the harder questions. Does anyone have any advice/tips/resources or a general approach for the LR section. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you all!

Comments

  • yunonsieyunonsie Alum Member
    611 karma

    Which question types do you personally find the most difficult? Sorting through that answer may help pinpoint any weaknesses. Or is dense, abstract language more of a concern than specific question types? Another factor is time. It's totally plausible that you can understand those questions, but not in a limited time setting (BR is a good indicator). I generally think being specific (and honest) about what is giving you a hard time is a great step towards improving on LR. Good luck!

  • fieldcross255fieldcross255 Member
    36 karma

    I was told one time that you should go into the answer sets assuming all of them are wrong. They need to prove to you the right answer. This really helped me with the MBT and MSS questions. As far as others learn to pick out conclusion and premises. Also repatition will make you better. I have found that if I am stuck between two answers. The one that I have absolutely no clue what is saying is usually the right one.

  • pugloverpuglover Monthly Member
    148 karma

    @fieldcross255 said:
    I was told one time that you should go into the answer sets assuming all of them are wrong. They need to prove to you the right answer. This really helped me with the MBT and MSS questions. As far as others learn to pick out conclusion and premises. Also repatition will make you better. I have found that if I am stuck between two answers. The one that I have absolutely no clue what is saying is usually the right one.

    Thank you! I think having a skeptical outlook would be helpful in answering these. I appreciate your help :smile:

  • pugloverpuglover Monthly Member
    148 karma

    @fieldcross255 said:
    I was told one time that you should go into the answer sets assuming all of them are wrong. They need to prove to you the right answer. This really helped me with the MBT and MSS questions. As far as others learn to pick out conclusion and premises. Also repatition will make you better. I have found that if I am stuck between two answers. The one that I have absolutely no clue what is saying is usually the right one.

    @yunonsie said:
    Which question types do you personally find the most difficult? Sorting through that answer may help pinpoint any weaknesses. Or is dense, abstract language more of a concern than specific question types? Another factor is time. It's totally plausible that you can understand those questions, but not in a limited time setting (BR is a good indicator). I generally think being specific (and honest) about what is giving you a hard time is a great step towards improving on LR. Good luck!

    Thank you. I think overtime I will get better at improving, but I like the idea of being aware of your mistakes/shortcomings. I think with practice I will improve :smiley:

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