Usually, when you take an LSAT, you will get your score report back along with the entire test you took. That means you’ll get to see not only your LSAT score, but also the actual questions you attempted to answer on test day. You can look at your score report, analyze the questions you missed, and review it like you would a PrepTest. These are the disclosed LSATs.

With a disclosed LSAT, on score release day, you’ll get the following from LSAC:

  • Your scaled score (120 – 180)
  • Your raw score (0 – 100)
  • Your percentile (0% – 99.9%)
  • A copy of your answer sheet
  • A copy of the test you took with every single question in it

However, some LSATs are not disclosed. When the test is nondisclosed, you won’t get the test back when you receive your score. That means you can't see where you made mistakes.

On score release day, you’ll only get the following from LSAC:

  • Your score (120 – 180)
  • Your percentile (0% – 99.9%)

Obviously, it’s a drawback of taking the nondisclosed LSAT that you can’t review the questions you missed. Indeed, you won’t even know which questions you missed.

How many LSATs are nondisclosed?

In the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean in 2018–2019, three LSATs are nondisclosed.

  • June 2018
  • July 2018 (nondisclosed)
  • September 2018
  • November 2018
  • January 2019 (nondisclosed)
  • March 2019 (nondisclosed)

In addition to the three above, LSATs taken outside the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean are always nondisclosed. These tests are often referred to as international tests.

Are international nondisclosed tests different?

Nope.

For example, students reported that the June 2018 LSAT in Asia (nondisclosed) used the same test as the February 2015 LSAT (nondisclosed) in North America. The December 2017 LSAT in Asia and February 2018 LSAT in Europe was also the test used for the February 2013 LSAT (nondisclosed) in North America.

The LSAT is a standardized test for admission to law schools in North America (and a few schools in Australia), so it's not supposed to vary by region. International tests often use previously administered nondisclosed LSATs (such as February tests in North America).

Why are some LSATs nondisclosed?

LSAC says, "LSAC discloses some but not all tests because it is necessary to have some nondisclosed test forms available for emergencies and special uses."

It is a way for LSAC to keep some test forms for future uses. For example, there are sometimes make-up tests for people who couldn’t take the LSAT due to some natural disaster, and according to some students’ reports, previously administered nondisclosed tests are used in make-up administrations.

How should I prepare for nondisclosed tests?

In exactly the same way as you would for any LSAT. There’s nothing different you should do for nondisclosed tests.

Featured image: CarlosR38

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