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Rejected from my first preference and unsure of my next move

willrpaytonwillrpayton Legacy Member
in General 33 karma

So I'm based in Melbourne, Australia and my first preference is Melbourne University and my second is Monash University. I have already been accepted into Monash (my alma mater), and today I was notified that my application from Melbourne was rejected because my score was too low. My LSAT score is 156 and they have indicated they'd be looking for 160+ for a successful application. I'm 24 and I'm kind torn on whether I should try the LSAT again and wait till the next round this time next year, or accept Monash and start in January. If I wait I would be graduating at 29 or possibly older and feel that might be too old, but Melbourne is 8th in the world and the LSAT standards in Australia are so much lower than the rest of the world, I feel like its an opportunity I shouldn't squander. The next LSAT exam is in January here but there will also be one in March, and probably June as well as September, so I'm also not sure if I do opt to take it again if I want to draw it out for more study time, or do it sooner so as to not forget stuff or burn out.

Opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Predicament Options Poll
  1. Which option should I take?32 votes
    1. Take a year to try again for First Preference
      81.25%
    2. Accept Second Preference
      18.75%
  2. If LSAT, which round?32 votes
    1. January
      28.13%
    2. March
      31.25%
    3. Later
      40.63%

Comments

  • SupernoviceSupernovice Alum Member
    323 karma

    You're 24 and concerned about taking a year? Pffffft! Dude, come on. I could've held my breath for a year at 24.

    I think you'll be okay either way; it's gonna be what you make of it in the end, but if it's going to cause you regrets or "what if's" later down the road if you don't go to your first choice--and the fact that you are not far off the mark, I'd go that route. It would be different if you were far from your target LSAT score, but you're right there. If you go to your second choice, you'll never go to your first... If you take some time and try to go to your first, but still don't get accepted, you can always fall back on your second. A one year wait may seem like a big deal to you now, but later on when you're old as hell like me, you'll see that one year really is no big deal.

  • LSAT_WreckerLSAT_Wrecker Legacy Member
    4850 karma

    @Supernovice Offers great advice. I'll add:

    1. Age: I'll be 47 when I sit down at orientation. I'll take the bar at 50. I sat out last cycle because my LSAT wasn't shiny enough to overcome a horrible 20 year-old uGPA. Age is just a number.

    2. First / Second choice - Not to minimize your decision, but you have a first world problem. Take the long view, if 10-20 years from now, you'll look up at your diploma on the wall and sigh over lost opportunities, then sit out and raise your LSAT. If you would rather get your legal career moving now, then fully embrace your current acceptance and don't look back.

    Either way, good luck!

  • Rule No 8Rule No 8 Alum Member
    141 karma

    Hi,

    I understand feeling like you don’t want to be a year older. I just turned 29 and will have to wait one more year to apply because I was not happy with my LSAT score. I want to get into a top 14 and I have decided I will not settle right now because I know I can improve more. You are definitely not too old even though it may feel that way. Ultimately the decision is up to you but don’t sell yourself short. Think about what you want to do with your career. Which school will allow you to do what you want. Is mobility important to you? At least here, the better the school the more the mobility. I am scoring about where you want to be scoring. If you would like a study partner I am here and I would like to help.

    Wishing you the bestie luck with your decision,

    Rule No 8

  • Leah M BLeah M B Alum Member
    8392 karma

    Hello, from your friendly neighborhood 34 year old, who delayed a cycle last year. I wouldn't be out of law school until I'm 38. Take it from us older folks, you have So. Much. Time. I know it feels like time is running out but really, I say you should even push back a year so you can just enjoy one more year of your twenties being young and energetic, and savor that time before locking yourself down in law school. There truly is no rush to get this started.

    All that said, I have absolutely no idea about the job market in Australia or how law admissions and scholarships work there. I'd say to wait if you think you could raise your LSAT to meet that, and it would result in a significant positive outcome, like increased employment odds and/or more money for school. If you think that your 2nd choice school is really not that different and you're eager to start, then go for it. But if your first choice would put you in a better position post-school, then just go ahead and take that extra year. It'd be worth it.

  • turnercmturnercm Alum Member 🍌
    edited December 2018 770 karma

    This may be a bit unconventional, but is it possible to retake in January and ask for reconsideration? (If you can bring it above a 160 that is) I read that someone did exactly that, same cycle, and the admissions committee reversed their decision and accepted them. Best case scenario they let you in, worst case you still have a year to reapply.

  • heather.falconheather.falcon Monthly Member
    38 karma

    Don't worry about being 24! I'm almost 26 and looking to get into law school for the fall 2019/spring 2020 cycle, meaning that I'll be past 30. Don't pressure yourself with artificial deadlines created by yourself or others. What's right for you will happen, and follow what your gut says is the best decision. I will have taken almost 2 years past undergrad by the time I'm in law school, and not only hast he break been great for my mental health and relaxation, but it's enabled me to advance even more in my work position from being a legal assistant to now a paralegal. I feel so much more confident in my decision for law school and my preparedness level, and I wouldn't have known that if I didn't allow myself the break to study more and get a higher LSAT score.

  • Sam TylerSam Tyler Alum Member
    449 karma

    @turnercm said:
    This may be a bit unconventional, but is it possible to retake in January and ask for reconsideration? (If you can bring it above a 160 that is) I read that someone did exactly that, same cycle, and the admissions committee reversed their decision and accepted them. Best case scenario they let you in, worst case you still have a year to reapply.

    I agree with this. It's worth a shot. Go ham on the LSAT until Jan and if you can get it up to 160+ request for reconsideration. If you hit January and you cant get to 160 then you can reevaluate, but honestly you have nothing to lose giving it another shot for for this year.

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