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5 Reasons to Ditch LSAT this Weekend :)

SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
edited November 2016 in General 10779 karma
Hey fellow 7sagers : )

I am seeing a lot of posts about people knowing they are not ready for the test but still taking it or realizing by answering their LSAT questions that they do not yet have a good grasp on fundamentals but are still taking the test. So if your average score of past 3-5 correctly timed stimulated practice test is not within plus or minus 5 of your ideal score. This post is for you.

A little background: I was once where you are, not ready for the test, but I was registered. I had already paid the $180 ( or whatever the exorbitant amount they charge us) and quite frankly refused to let my hard earned money go to waste. I mean, $180 is a lot of money! I was determined to at least get "something" out of that money I had already given to LSAC. I reasoned I could get some real time practice about how LSAT really was and somehow that would help me when I was finally able to take the test having studied to my full potential, at a later date of course. But then some "mentors" descended out of nowhere and helped me see where I was going wrong and I hope I can do the same for you and return that favor. So below I have listed five reasons you should not take LSAT this coming Saturday.

Why you should ditch LSAT this weekend :)

#1) Learning from other people who have taken the test before they were ready: It's more effective to learn from other people who have done something similar than to do the same thing and expect different results. When I have asked people who have taken this test before they were ready none of them have yet said to me "That was such an invaluable experience!". On the contrary I mostly hear regrets. I often hear "I wished someone had told me not to take the test. I just wasted my takes. Even though I am now ready, my real lsat score ended up being slightly below what I was scoring on my practice and I wish I had more takes left." You literally just have to ask around to see the regrets in people who took the test before they were ready to know that this idea of using a real take as a practice test is nothing compared to the value of having a few takes left and scoring your ideal score and getting into your dream college. Some people need to take it twice or thrice to just score within their practice range. So please err on the side of caution and give yourself that opportunity.

#2) Don't give your application a weakness it doesn't have yet: When you get down to submitting your applications, which one of us really wants to write about why one of our LSAT score was low?

#3) $180 is actually not a lot of money: Okay It's a lot of money if you think in terms of how most of us have to pinch money so we can work as few hours as possible and study for LSAT as much as we can. But If you take a look at the financial impact a good college can have on our lives, that $180 doesn't seem to be worth it to fuss over.The current lawyer I work for went to T20 law school and can make that much in less than half an hour, and this isn't even big law. So although that $180 seems a lot right now, the opportunities that can come from getting into a top college and having an amazing application which cannot happen without an LSAT score, is worth to lose that $180 now. Lets not throw good money after bad.

#4) That practice we all want to get this Saturday can be achieved in a library with JY's recorded voice as the proctor: is it exactly the same as real time? No. But if you adhere to it and don't cheat yourself, there is not much difference between a real proctored test and JY proctored test. Could bad things happen during the real thing? Yes. But you could prepare yourself for that too by taking it in places where its hard to take the test. The point being you can stimulate real test day, apart from unseen circumstances, pretty accurately. So don't use a real take for practice; use practice test for practice, and real test for when you are really ready.

#5) Maybe I can score a 170 on the real test?!!!!:> I call this the "I am the Exception" feeling and I think this is actually a big one. Despite the evidence in front of us where our practice scores and our dream scores just do not match, somehow we get convinced we might get that 170 or who knows even that 180 if we just take this test. I think this happens because all us are actually very good students, who get mostly A's, or know we are smart because even when we didn't work hard we still managed to get that high grade. We have by now mastered the art of cramming the day before the test; surely if in college studying the night before could get me A+, I can study this week before the test and beat everybody just like I used to. While it might have worked in college, I am here to tell you sadly LSAT is different. Unlike cramming, LSAT requires us to develop good and efficient habits. It's not something we score on the test day, but something we have already scored in our practice test.
*So unless you actually attended Hogwarts and know some spells to ace this LSAT in a different way, I recommend using your practice test as a guide to know when you are ready. After all, is PT 80 going to be so different from PT 75-79 that your score will jump tremendously? Probably not. Maybe a little if you are lucky like some ( I have yet to hear a more than 5 point jump), but not by a lot.


#6) Confidence: ( I know I said five reasons but its actually six. Five just made for a better Title of the post ;) ) I know from taking enough PT's that confidence can play a big role into the score I am going to get. The more confident I am, the faster I will end up going through questions and finish everything on time. But the funny thing about confidence is that it has to come from ability. If you are not yet able to answer questions correctly and fast, you are either going to be over confident in which you will answer things incorrectly or you are going to be under confident and stressed, and you will also end up answering things incorrectly. Confidence in LSAT is great when it comes from acquired ability, it doesn't work the other way around and it can definitely hinder you if you are not confident because you know you are not ready.

I know this is not the news most of us want to hear, especially when we are registered to take the test in a few days. But I hope this gives you at least a few points to consider. The rest is up to you of course. Good luck in whatever direction you end up going. Much much love.

I would like to add an inspiring story for people who don't want to wait till the next application cycle to take the test:

I once met a Dentist who told me that he waited three years to get into UC San Francisco, which is the #1 Dental School in United States. During those three years he faced constant doubt from himself because of how hard it was for him to score high on that test and the pressure from his family who thought he was just wasting time. But he didn't budge. And now that he has graduated from the top Dental school and makes a lot of money, no one remembers that time. His family doesn't and he certainly doesn't. He is very happy he made that decision and gave himself the best opportunity he could to succeed and he has succeeded.

I wish only success and the best for all of you. Good luck <3
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Comments

  • nessa.k13.0nessa.k13.0 Inactive ⭐
    4141 karma
    You made some great points here Sami! I decided to postpone the Dec test and it's one of the best decisions I've made. Thanks for listing out reasons why it isn't wise to rush into taking the LSAT:)
  • BinghamtonDaveBinghamtonDave Alum Member 🍌🍌
    8694 karma
    Fantastic post @Sami !
  • Cant Get RightCant Get Right Yearly + Live Member Sage 🍌 7Sage Tutor
    27829 karma
    @Sami , where were you this time last year, lol? I did all of these things wrong. Horrible mistake. Wish you'd been there to talk me down.
  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma
    @Sami - Great Post!!

    For all the people that I have personally discussed their circumstances and ultimate decision to withdraw due to recognition of not being fully prepared -

    No one has ever said "I regret withdrawing"

    With most people I know achieving or more often exceeding their desired score band once they were prepared to take the test:)
  • Bevs ScooterMinionBevs ScooterMinion Alum Member
    1018 karma
    If I withdraw my registration, is each withdrawal included in my no more than "3 tests within two years" LSAC max?

    I guess what I'm asking, is a "registration withdrawal" considered the same as a "score cancellation?"
  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma
    @ScooterMinion A withdraw does not count as anything other than the loss of money:) You have until 11:59 ET the night before the test to withdraw.
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    edited November 2016 23929 karma
    @Sami Love this post! Ditch the LSAT! I actually was finally able to officially withdraw yesterday. I had registered for the December LSAT in July when I began 7Sage....
  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma
    @"Alex Divine" said:
    I actually was finally able to officially withdraw
    Woohoo - Congrats and Party Time - with lSAT study, of course:P
  • SprinklesSprinkles Alum Member
    11542 karma
    @ScooterMinion said:
    If I withdraw my registration, is each withdrawal included in my no more than "3 tests within two years" LSAC max?
    Nope, you're good! an extreme example is - let's say you registered 3 times and withdrew from all of them - you're still able to sit for the next LSAT.
  • DEC_LSATDEC_LSAT Alum Member
    760 karma
    @Sami said:
    Much much love.
    much love to you too! thanks for taking the time to write!
  • SprinklesSprinkles Alum Member
    11542 karma
    @twssmith said:
    A withdraw does not count as anything other than the loss of money:) You have until 11:59 ET the night before the test to withdraw.
    Oops, just saw this haha. But good added point on the deadline to withdraw.
  • Bevs ScooterMinionBevs ScooterMinion Alum Member
    1018 karma
    @Sami , thank you for this post. Thank you for today. <3 Thanks to all, for your advice and input. I now know why you're all called Sages. <3

    I just withdrew my sit for this weekend. I admitted to myself that I'm not anywhere near ready and shouldn't throw myself under the bus by sitting for it sooner than I'm ready.

    I'm coming for you, LSAT. Soon, Precious.
  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma
    @ScooterMinion said:
    I just withdrew my sit for this weekend
    Woohoo - Congrats on a great decision:)
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @Sami said:
    I once met a Dentist who told me that he waited three years to get into UC San Francisco, which is the #1 Dental School in United States. During those three years he faced constant doubt from himself because of how hard it was for him to score high on that test and the pressure from his family who thought he was just wasting time. But he didn't budge. And now that he has graduated from the top Dental school and makes a lot of money, no one remembers that time. His family doesn't and he certainly doesn't. He is very happy he made that decision and gave himself the best opportunity he could to succeed and he has succeeded.

    LOVE this. Absolutely LOVE this.
  • icecreamparfaiticecreamparfait Free Trial Member
    82 karma
    Hi Sami, thanks for writing this----would be absolutely helpful for other students.
    Quick question---
    did the doctor study for the test while working full-time?
    How did he manage to the family pressure? Have you heard anything about it?

    Thanks again,
  • bjphillips5bjphillips5 Alum Member
    edited November 2016 1137 karma
    @Sami knocks out important posts like... @Hermione
    image
  • Bevs ScooterMinionBevs ScooterMinion Alum Member
    edited November 2016 1018 karma
    thanks @twssmith , lol @bjphillips5
  • Rigid DesignatorRigid Designator Alum Member
    1091 karma
    Hope this isn't a silly question, but ought I consider myself prepared if I can get my ideal score by adding +5 (or +4 more conservatively) to my average of the last 3 PTs I've done? Like, if I do that much better than my average this weekend I'll certainly be happy and wouldn't likely retake, yet I'm still certain I have more preparation left in the tank...

    I suppose this is slightly tangential anyway, given that you didn't exactly say that being within +/-5 of your ideal score is a sufficient condition for being prepared (just that the negation of this is sufficient for being unprepared).
  • SprinklesSprinkles Alum Member
    11542 karma
    @bjphillips5 said:
    image
    Lol, leave it to BJ to find an appropriate HP gif for this post.
  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma
    For anyone deciding to postpone...
    Make sure to check out the June BR Study Group!
    They have been invaluable to me during my PT phase providing interactive study sessions and a family of friends that I cherish:)

    https://7sage.com/discussion/#/discussion/9475/new-june-2017-study-br-group
  • mazzinithesecondmazzinithesecond Free Trial Member
    edited November 2016 61 karma
    After much debate within myself, I finally made one of the hardest decisions I can possibly remember... I canceled my December sit. Canceling my December sit means having to take a year off after I graduate in the upcoming Spring, something I told myself I'd never do, but here I am. Although I'm a perfectionist who can't bear to come to terms with the current harsh reality, I'm starting to accept that it's okay to know that I'm not fully prepared at the moment because I know for a fact I'm not hitting anywhere near my LSAT potential. Thank you for the encouraging words, @Sami . On the road to a 180!
  • DEC_LSATDEC_LSAT Alum Member
    760 karma
    i've scored my target about 5 times and i've never written before. should i go for it? it's kind of up in the air since i've scored exactly on my target and if i ever score higher it's by 2 more points max
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    My pleasure. I am so glad I could help. I know how hard this decision must have been for you so I am soo proud of you. If you ever need anything, know that you have a fellow leftie right here
    @ScooterMinion said:
    I now know why you're all called Sages. <3


    P.S. I am just a mentor (which means just someone who is helpful), I am still working on LSAT. @"Cant Get Right" is the "Sage" here.
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    @mw393730 said:
    did the doctor study for the test while working full-time?
    How did he manage to the family pressure? Have you heard anything about it?
    Hey, so I only met him once, and I remember him saying he was working at that time ( I think full time but I could be mistaken). If I remember it correctly his job was working at a doctors office scanning brains, so I think it must be full time.

    As for family issues he said it was tough. But he just ignored it and kept his focus despite the constant criticism because that's all he could do.

    I hope that helped : )
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    10779 karma
    @"Rigid Designator" said:
    Hope this isn't a silly question, but ought I consider myself prepared if I can get my ideal score by adding +5 (or +4 more conservatively) to my average of the last 3 PTs I've done? Like, if I do that much better than my average this weekend I'll certainly be happy and wouldn't likely retake, yet I'm still certain I have more preparation left in the tank...
    Hey not a silly question at all. : )

    I think it depends on if you would be okay with scoring within that range. I hope you do get +5 of your average, but if you are okay with scoring slightly below that, I think its fine if you take it : ) I think being comfortable of that range is what really matters.

    Good luck!
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    @mazzini2 said:
    After much debate within myself, I finally made one of the hardest decisions I can possibly remember...
    Honestly, I am so proud of you. It is one of the hardest decision I have made as well. <3 But it's definitely on the right track <3 <3

    On the road to 180! : )

    Oh and yes, preparedness is not sufficient to get the target score, but I do think its a very good indicator of where you are likely to score.
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    @"DEC_LSAT" said:
    i've scored my target about 5 times
    I think if you have scored consistently within your target score you should be fine : ) You score is probably be going to be within that range <3

    I mean this is not a guarantee but its a damn good estimate : )
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    @"Cant Get Right" said:
    I did all of these things wrong.
    You do know that all of the points to a huge extent have been taken from your experience right?

    Thanks for telling me what not to do :D
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    10779 karma
    @"DEC_LSAT" said:
    much love to you too! thanks for taking the time to write!
    My pleasure <3 <3 Thanks!!!!!!
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    10779 karma
    @bjphillips5 said:
    @Sami knocks out important posts like... @Hermione
    image
    haha lol as always thank you for the best gifs :D
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    10779 karma
    @"Alex Divine" said:
    Ditch the LSAT! I actually was finally able to officially withdraw yesterday.
    Oh Yaaaay!!!! I had no idea you were even registered. Dude, I know you knew you weren't ready. What took you so long to withdraw? You could have at least gotten some of that money back! :D
  • Cant Get RightCant Get Right Yearly + Live Member Sage 🍌 7Sage Tutor
    27829 karma
    @ScooterMinion said:
    I'm coming for you, LSAT. Soon, Precious.
    Yes!
  • steve-10steve-10 Alum Member
    192 karma
    @Sami said:
    So if your average score of past 3-5 correctly timed stimulated practice test is not within plus or minus 5 of your ideal score.
    I suppose this is meant to be something like, if your average score is more than 5 below your ideal score, withdraw. In other words, if the average is higher than ideal-5, there is not a reason to withdraw.

    More seriously: how does one select an "ideal" score? How does one gauge how much improvement is possible from one's current state? How can one be confident that one will be more "ready" at some future date?
  • Summer518Summer518 Member
    60 karma
    I just withdrew mine too....Great advice tho Sami! <3 I am still going to the "celebration" on Saturday in NYC..anyone else going?
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma
    @Sami said:
    Oh Yaaaay!!!! I had no idea you were even registered. Dude, I know you knew you weren't ready. What took you so long to withdraw? You could have at least gotten some of that money back! :D
    I had a waiver, so they made me wait until a special deadline. No money lost :)
  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    edited November 2016 23929 karma
    @"steve-10" said:
    More seriously: how does one select an "ideal" score? How does one gauge how much improvement is possible from one's current state? How can one be confident that one will be more "ready" at some future date?
    There's not a universal calculus to selecting your ideal score per say. However, I think one's ideal score should be a 180. Why aim for anything less than a "perfect score" haha.

    That said, I think setting a "score goal" that's reasonable should be primarily based on the LSAT stats (25th-50th-75%tiles) at the law school(s) you are aiming for.

    For example, if your ultimate goal is to be admitted to Columbia Law, your target LSAT should be at or above a 172 which is their median.

    One useful way to gauge improvement is your blind review score; that is your true potential.
    Confidence that you'll do better in the future also comes from your BR score. Also, it can just come from your own faith and confidence in yourself.

  • Cant Get RightCant Get Right Yearly + Live Member Sage 🍌 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 27829 karma
    @Sami said:
    Thanks for telling me what not to do :D
    Telling people not to do the things I did is probably my most important contribution here, lol!
    @"steve-10" said:
    how does one select an "ideal" score? How does one gauge how much improvement is possible from one's current state? How can one be confident that one will be more "ready" at some future date?
    Everyone's ideal score is going to be arrived at differently. It may depend on the score you need for a particular school, or it may just be that you want to maximize your potential. As far as how to know if you can improve or not, that's just a matter of honest self reflection. Sometimes this is easy, like for people who are just finishing the curriculum and realize they've only had time to take a single PT. Sometimes though, it's just a matter of not being satisfied with where you're at. I think determining how you're going to improve is a big aspect of the decision in this case. If you've been studying for a long time, then you need to be able to answer how you expect to do better between now and a future test date. This will be different for everyone, but I think common answers to that are incorporating higher level study strategies and employing better self discipline.
  • LSATShinobiLSATShinobi Free Trial Member
    236 karma
    Very Inspiring post
  • Stevie CStevie C Alum Member
    645 karma
    @"Cant Get Right" said:
    If you've been studying for a long time, then you need to be able to answer how you expect to do better between now and a future test date.
    Quoted for truth
  • louladybug2louladybug2 Member
    15 karma
    @Sami Thank you for posting. Saying that its Okay to skip December. Skipping will put my dream on hold for another year so I still torn but also don't want to waste a test either. I still haven't decided to actually drop out on December yet probably wont till Thursday. Ya never know maybe ill have some great breakthrough in the next few days.
  • tanes256tanes256 Alum Member
    2573 karma
    Yep, I'm withdrawing too. I've known I was going to for some time but missed deadline to change date. I'm still in this thang!
  • Jessica_KubaJessica_Kuba Core Member
    461 karma
    Sami, this was wonderfully worded and stated. There's just so much wisdom in this post and I appreciate you taking the time to write it.
    My story is similar to everyone's on this post and I too made the decision to postpone after withdrawing twice (September and this December). I realized it doesn't make me dumb or less smart but I'm focused on the bigger goal- aiming for the best possible score I can get. So when compared with how it could turn out for me in the future, taking a year off is a sacrifice I'm willing to make. Thanks again Sami you are awesome!!
  • Burt MacklinBurt Macklin Alum Member
    170 karma
    This will be the second testing I have paid for but will not take. Feel better knowing others are in a similar situation.
  • SprinklesSprinkles Alum Member
    11542 karma
    @"Burt Macklin" said:
    This will be the second testing I have paid for but will not take.
    Lol, LSAC appreciates your kind donations. It will be worth it though!
  • DumbHollywoodActorDumbHollywoodActor Alum Inactive ⭐
    7468 karma
    Now you've done it! You're going to have to re-post this before every administration because it's so good. :)
  • TheMikeyTheMikey Alum Member
    edited November 2016 4196 karma
    Glad to say that I withdrew from the December LSAT a few weeks ago. I'm not completely ready, and this would have been my third take. LISTEN TO THIS ADVICE PEOPLE!!! YOUR TAKES ARE PRECIOUS!
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    10779 karma
    @louladybug2 said:
    still haven't decided to actually drop out on December yet probably wont till Thursday.
    and that is totally fine <3 <3 Thank you for the kind words! I hope you do well whichever way you chose to go <3
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    10779 karma
    @tanes256 said:
    I'm still in this thang!
    We all are buddy <3 <3 Good luck : )
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    @"Jessica_Kuba" said:
    My story is similar to everyone's on this post and I too made the decision to postpone after withdrawing twice (September and this December). I realized it doesn't make me dumb or less smart but I'm focused on the bigger goal- aiming for the best possible score I can get. So when compared with how it could turn out for me in the future, taking a year off is a sacrifice I'm willing to make.
    Thank you for sharing your story <3 Much Much love twin ;) <3 <3 <3
  • SamiSami Live Member Sage 7Sage Tutor
    edited November 2016 10779 karma
    @"Burt Macklin" said:
    This will be the second testing I have paid for but will not take. Feel better knowing others are in a similar situation.
    aww Yeah for sure. if you ask @"Accounts Playable", who is a sage, he moved his test date multiple times. So don't feel bad at all. I am proud of you for not giving up on this <3
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