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Any older non-traditional students?

gaflparalegalgaflparalegal Legacy Member
in General 133 karma

I’m 38, a single mom of 2. Been out of school since 2000, finishing up my BA now I’m hopes to apply to law school in the next 2 years.

Anyone else in a similar position? How do you stay motivated? Any worries about juggling law school and a family? Do you think being older hurts our chances? I’ve been a paralegal for 9 years so I’m hoping that experience will help instead of hinder.

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Comments

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma
  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma

    I think being older can give you some advantages. More experienced/ more acquired life skills /time management (generally speaking ) . Hats off to you for embarking on this journey.

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    lol @ebalde1234 didn't think anyone notice me!

    Hey @gaflparalegal I'm a mom of two also but been out of school way longer! Motivation is so tough. I've learned that for me, taking breaks helps me to renew my motivation. I've also started changing up my study environment - if I study at home too long I start doing laundry, figuring out dinner, cleaning up toys, so I've been going to different libraries to get that motivation going and get out of "mom" zone.

    I def worry about juggling law and family. When I first started this journey I didn't think it would be possible to do both. I have plans for when I finally go to law school. The first year is going to undoubtedly going to be the toughest so I am thinking of dorming at school m-f and coming home on the weekends. I'm not sure how that's going to work out but that is my idea so far. I think there will be sacrifices to be made with the kids and their activities but I keep telling myself that it will only be for a year and hopefully it will all somehow work out.

    I don't think being older hurts out chances. I think it may even be to our benefit as most schools look for work experience and other activities you have done throughout your life. Def expand on that in your PS.

    Good luck!! Happy to answer any more questions. Have to run to get the kids from camp now!

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma

    @LCMama2017 haha nope I’ve been keeping up with the forums and you’re a great contributor . I hope you can both motivate and be each other’s supports

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma
  • JustDoItJustDoIt Alum Member
    3106 karma
  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    I'm not sure she is still on this board - I believe she got into her choice law school : ).

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @ebalde1234 said:
    @LCMama2017 haha nope I’ve been keeping up with the forums and you’re a great contributor . I hope you can both motivate and be each other’s supports

    Thanks dude. This community has been super helpful to me so trying to give back :smile:

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @gaflparalegal take a look at this thread... it may help... there are several of us older folk on this board :smile:

    https://7sage.com/discussion/#/discussion/comment/112578

  • gaflparalegalgaflparalegal Legacy Member
    133 karma

    @LCMama2017 thank you for sharing. It is definitely a challenge and mental struggle. There are a few schools that have housing options but not many. I am hoping to get a good LSAT score and receive a scholarship which will help with part of the struggle.

    @ebalde1234 thank you!! Going to check out the other posts now :smile:

  • LSAT_WreckerLSAT_Wrecker Legacy Member
    4850 karma

    @gaflparalegal said:
    I’m 38, a single mom of 2. Been out of school since 2000, finishing up my BA now I’m hopes to apply to law school in the next 2 years.

    Anyone else in a similar position? How do you stay motivated? Any worries about juggling law school and a family? Do you think being older hurts our chances? I’ve been a paralegal for 9 years so I’m hoping that experience will help instead of hinder.

    You got this. I'm a little bit older and have 4 children, although only the youngest still lives at home. As a soft, I don't think age hurts things at all. I think you come at law school and the law school admissions process from a different place than the typical applicant. Obviously, you know what the real world is like, have other (re: more important) responsibilities and experiences (like paying bills, parenting, maintaining a responsible schedule) and will probably view your studies in a healthy perspective. Also, you, specifically as a paralegal, have seen a lot of the true inner workings of real world law and bring a specific perspective into the process. Whether or not that helps in the admissions process (I can't see it being a negative on your resume), it probably definitely helps when you actually practice law.

    We'll always have to balance family with studies, but I think the AARP crowd comes to it from a position of strength. Push hard to get what you want!

  • AudaciousRedAudaciousRed Alum Member
    2689 karma

    Similar boat. 35, mom. I will have to do the M-F living away from home deal, and hopefully come home on weekends and breaks. The biggest advice is to rally your tribe. Friends, family, neighbors... they're all going to be necessary. Let people help you.
    I'm also shooting for big scholarship or bust. Just the expenses of having to live away from home are going to create debt. I don't need that and all the school debt.

    Does being older hurt us? Maybe a little. It's hard to study for this stuff and work on school and be a parent and work, too. So I think the k-JD kids have us beat there. But, I think we have a drive that they don't. We have seen the world, and we know this is what we want. We have had to make things work and suffered set backs those kids wont understand for a decade or two yet. We bring different perspectives and our own determination to get things done on time. We're also probably less likely to party, ditch class, and be reckless with our education. ;) I've heard that non-traditional students seem to be favored these days. No idea if that's really true.

    Do I worry about juggling it all? Absolutely. It's pretty scary, to be honest. Will it all work out without me being there every day? How will 3 years of it impact my kids development if mom isn't around? How will those 3 years affect the other family members? Will the family adhere to the budget while I'm away? I do worry about it all. The school part is actually the least of my concerns. Not like we have a choice, though. And in the long run, this helps our family. It helps my kid in so many ways. It'd be stupid not to go if I got the chance to. So, it helps keep things in perspective. It helps keep me motivated, too, in a way. I don't really have an answer to fixing it. I think it will be a problem every parent has to overcome. The bright side is, there are plenty of success stories showing they got through just fine. And so will we.

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @AudaciousRed said:
    Similar boat. 35, mom. I will have to do the M-F living away from home deal, and hopefully come home on weekends and breaks. The biggest advice is to rally your tribe. Friends, family, neighbors... they're all going to be necessary. Let people help you.
    I'm also shooting for big scholarship or bust. Just the expenses of having to live away from home are going to create debt. I don't need that and all the school debt.

    Does being older hurt us? Maybe a little. It's hard to study for this stuff and work on school and be a parent and work, too. So I think the k-JD kids have us beat there. But, I think we have a drive that they don't. We have seen the world, and we know this is what we want. We have had to make things work and suffered set backs those kids wont understand for a decade or two yet. We bring different perspectives and our own determination to get things done on time. We're also probably less likely to party, ditch class, and be reckless with our education. ;) I've heard that non-traditional students seem to be favored these days. No idea if that's really true.

    Do I worry about juggling it all? Absolutely. It's pretty scary, to be honest. Will it all work out without me being there every day? How will 3 years of it impact my kids development if mom isn't around? How will those 3 years affect the other family members? Will the family adhere to the budget while I'm away? I do worry about it all. The school part is actually the least of my concerns. Not like we have a choice, though. And in the long run, this helps our family. It helps my kid in so many ways. It'd be stupid not to go if I got the chance to. So, it helps keep things in perspective. It helps keep me motivated, too, in a way. I don't really have an answer to fixing it. I think it will be a problem every parent has to overcome. The bright side is, there are plenty of success stories showing they got through just fine. And so will we.

    What great advice. We should all form some sort of group so we can keep in touch when we are finally in the throes of it all. I agree with you about the concerns about being away for most of the week - I'm hoping that it all works out but yeah, the concerns are real. Having family and friends helping us through the law school years will be the key to success for us. Wishing us all luck!

  • LawSkewlProbsLawSkewlProbs Alum Member
    103 karma

    36 year old dad here, married, with kids in 3rd, 7th, and 10th grade. Wife is pursuing her Master's this Fall and I'm prepping for the LSAT this year. I've come full circle and I found myself unhappy with my career options. I don't want to go through life wondering what I could've accomplished if I pursued what I really loved. I'm also hoping to get my score into a range where I can get scholarship money. It's going to be full of challenges juggling family life and the responsibilities of law school. It's got to get done though. I wish you luck!!!

  • cvaldez74cvaldez74 Legacy Member
    130 karma

    hi there! 44 yr old mom to three, wife to one here. my oldest is 25 and he's starting law school in St. Louis this fall, my middle is 23 and still lives at home while she finishes school, and my youngest is 10 and she's a full-on mama's girl - attached at the hip.

    I'm lucky because my husband's job (atty) affords me the flexibility to go to school without having to work outside of the home, so my jobs right now are parenting and studying. I've been working part-time-ish as a photographer (currently only shooting for stock agencies) for about 5 years and I love the work but I've always wanted to practice criminal law. I'm one semester away from graduating with my BA in Criminology.

    I'm putting a lot of stock into the LSAT because for me it's imperative that I get a scholarship in order to go to law school. I need to go to Stetson Law because it's local to me - living away from home is not an option for me and I want to be able to participate in local prosecutor and PD clinics (since that's where I hope to work). But if I don't get a scholarship, it just does not make good financial sense for me to rack up $150k in student loan debt to work at a job that pays $40k/year to start ($80k at the high point). and while there are a few other fields of practice that interest me, the whole reason I'm doing this is to practice criminal law. the last thing I want to do is put myself in a position where I need to take a job doing something I really don't like just to pay off my loans. because if I don't get a scholarship offer and I don't go to law school, my worst case scenario is not a "worst case" at all - I'll fall back on my photography career.

    I definitely deal with all of the "what if's" and "am I doing the right thing?" questions all the time. the biggest two for me are: "will my family or marriage suffer as a result of this?" and "do I really want to give up the freedom and flexibility that I currently have in exchange for the daily grind again?" everyone in my family is very supportive of me going to law school, but I do worry that they're going to resent me when I'm not here anymore in the ways that I am now - when I'm no longer readily available to them. I especially worry how all of this will affect my super-attached 10 yr old...she'll be starting middle school the year I start law school. middle school sucks as it is, I don't want it to be even harder for her because I'm suddenly less available. and then my concerns about giving up my current freedoms fluctuate - one day I'm excited about the opportunity to interact with like-minded, intellectually stimulating people and the next I'm thinking "you'll be 50 in about 5 minutes, do you really want to be starting a career when most people are nearing retirement?" my brain is a stew of conflicting thoughts.

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @cvaldez74 said:
    hi there! 44 yr old mom to three, wife to one here. my oldest is 25 and he's starting law school in St. Louis this fall, my middle is 23 and still lives at home while she finishes school, and my youngest is 10 and she's a full-on mama's girl - attached at the hip.

    I'm lucky because my husband's job (atty) affords me the flexibility to go to school without having to work outside of the home, so my jobs right now are parenting and studying. I've been working part-time-ish as a photographer (currently only shooting for stock agencies) for about 5 years and I love the work but I've always wanted to practice criminal law. I'm one semester away from graduating with my BA in Criminology.

    I'm putting a lot of stock into the LSAT because for me it's imperative that I get a scholarship in order to go to law school. I need to go to Stetson Law because it's local to me - living away from home is not an option for me and I want to be able to participate in local prosecutor and PD clinics (since that's where I hope to work). But if I don't get a scholarship, it just does not make good financial sense for me to rack up $150k in student loan debt to work at a job that pays $40k/year to start ($80k at the high point). and while there are a few other fields of practice that interest me, the whole reason I'm doing this is to practice criminal law. the last thing I want to do is put myself in a position where I need to take a job doing something I really don't like just to pay off my loans. because if I don't get a scholarship offer and I don't go to law school, my worst case scenario is not a "worst case" at all - I'll fall back on my photography career.

    I definitely deal with all of the "what if's" and "am I doing the right thing?" questions all the time. the biggest two for me are: "will my family or marriage suffer as a result of this?" and "do I really want to give up the freedom and flexibility that I currently have in exchange for the daily grind again?" everyone in my family is very supportive of me going to law school, but I do worry that they're going to resent me when I'm not here anymore in the ways that I am now - when I'm no longer readily available to them. I especially worry how all of this will affect my super-attached 10 yr old...she'll be starting middle school the year I start law school. middle school sucks as it is, I don't want it to be even harder for her because I'm suddenly less available. and then my concerns about giving up my current freedoms fluctuate - one day I'm excited about the opportunity to interact with like-minded, intellectually stimulating people and the next I'm thinking "you'll be 50 in about 5 minutes, do you really want to be starting a career when most people are nearing retirement?" my brain is a stew of conflicting thoughts.

    @cvaldez74 you hit the nail right on the head about starting a career when others (like my husband) will be close to retirement. I do wonder about that too but like @LawSkewlProbs said above, I don't want to wonder what I could have done with my life if I had just followed my dreams. My sister just turned 50 and she switched careers at 40 and starting going to school for nursing. Now that she is 50 and done with school she is SO happy. That's what I want. I want to be happy finally doing something for me - that I love.

    As far your 10 year-old - that is a tough one. Middle school is tough and she will be right in the thick of it. Do you have anothe family member or close friend that can be around while you are in school or studying? I think the most support your daughter gets will also be helpful for her. Also, remember, that she is growing up and who knows, this time in middle school may be what she needs to gain some independence.

    As far as marriage - and this goes out to all married couples - I spoke with a former manager a little while back about going to law school. She is a successful lawyer who is just brilliant and she told me that law school is tough, allntime-consuming and if there are any problems in my marriage to solve them now. Because once we start law school those problems will be exacerbated by going to law school - specially that first year. All our time will be spent studying or going to class and our spouses will need to step up and be extremely understanding that we will not be around as much. The last thing we need is issues in our marriage and trying to study for an exam.

    Wishing you luck mama - there are many of us moms (and dads) here to support each other as we go through this process.

  • PandaRamenPandaRamen Alum Member
    162 karma

    @gaflparalegal Hi there. Im not sure if I am considered “older”, but based from the stat of my dream school, I would be. Im 28, and a mom of a 10 year old. Got pregnant when I was a teen which will be part of my PS. I got through a rigorous engineering program then pivoted into law. I think what motivated me to get through my B.S. was 2 things: I want to be an inspiration to my son, and (like many have said here) the "what ifs?" I cannot fathom not even TRYING to reach for my goal. I think engineering school was just a detour but I loved every minute of it. Even the crying in the bathroom stall due to stress and anxiety. Since you've been a paralegal, you know you want to be in the world of law. You've seen the underbelly and yet still want to pursue this path.

    I usually get my motivation from watching videos of motivational speakers. I like Les Brown. There is this great channel called Mateuz M that uses a lot of Les Brown speeches and Your World Within channel. These videos shifts my perspective when energy is low, doubt/insecurities is high. I usually put one video in the morning with my coffee before I do anything.

    All of us here know it will be an uphill climb. The juggling of our families, studies, and finances are pretty daunting if you ask me. but the 7Sage community is really great at supporting one another, so atleast you know you have someone to turn to (with somewhat similar experience) when things get difficult. :smile:

  • cdaddario2cdaddario2 Legacy Member
    362 karma

    HI
    Thanks for the post and all of the great comments. I just turned 49. I am taking the LSAT in November. I own a business so I understand the personal/professional difficulties. This experience, using 7Sage and opening up my mind to the regular exercise of study has been an excellent experience. Reading some of the comments from other older students is rather comforting. Keep up the pursuit. I wish you all great success.

  • jyarmojyarmo Alum Member
    350 karma

    Thanks for this post! I just recently posted about getting in and starting in the fall, but I love this community even though I'm mostly a lurker... I am hoping it works to do what others in similar threads have suggested and that is to look at law school like a full time job, cramming as much in the typical workday hours - between classes and on campus- as humanly possible so that my weekends and evenings can have some semblance of normalcy. I'm really lucky to have gotten a great, unexpected merit scholarship, so this is very affordable thankfully (with 2 kids in college) and my state school that I'll be attending is only about a 20 minute commute from home.

    I never really found my way to the right career, so regarding the "what are you thinking? you should be looking at retiring" comments or thoughts -- I am just so eager to do this and feel challenged and engaged, it is what is exactly right for me at this point in my life. Everyone is so different - my mother worked at a job she loved until well into her eighties which for me at 51 is quite a ways off! As I look at the women and men I know who aged well, they stayed excited and interested in learning and life - so we are on the right path there, I think.

    Also -thank you to @ebalde1234 for those super inspiring news story links!! Holy crap - those women are truly amazing.

    I have no idea how long I can keep peeking at these forums and staying engaged here now that I'm done with the LSAT, but I too love the thought of staying connected. Good luck!

  • brizzle525brizzle525 Alum Member
    139 karma

    I'll be 37 when I (hopefully) start law school next fall, and am married with one child, who will be 10 when I start. My husband is nearing retirement from the Air Force, but we are both taking this as a sort of transition time to new careers and learning to live the civilian life. I also worry often about how I will balance school and family. I am quite driven, and I always manage to get it done - but I know law school will demand more of me than anything I've ever done. My husband is very very supportive, and I have no doubt that he will step up and take one even more at home with me being tied up. I am concerned about my daughter, who is quite close to me and our only child. I am hopeful that I will find the way to balance and give her the attention she needs. I, too, am studying in hopes of landing a scholarship, because I just cannot see going into such huge debt at this stage of our lives.

    Best wishes to you all! I'm sure we will find our way. Many have done it before us, and will do it after us. We will find what works for our own situations and, as our family motto goes, "Do what we must, so we may do what we want."

  • gaflparalegalgaflparalegal Legacy Member
    133 karma

    Thank you for ALL of the comments!! The negative comments I get from people are- what about your boys? Won't they need their mom? Where will you find the time? What about working and paying the bills? I will be honest, the slew of negativity is overwhelming at times, especially when I (we) already know we are facing an uphill battle.
    I have been a paralegal since 2009 and have recently started doing some virtual work for a few attorneys, so I am hoping that in the next year or so that will pick up and help relieve the financial burden. If I am able to get my LSAT score to a good range I am also hoping for a scholarship. I have narrowed my list of potential schools down to ones that have the most flexible scheduling options....but that also means spending more time to complete the program, but that may be what it takes to achieve this dream. I will be around 40-41 when I apply (won't graduate with my BA until summer 2020)....which seems like forever away when I see it in writing. So I guess the goal would be to graduate with my JD by 45. 45 is the new 20 right? LOL
    My boys are currently 6 and 14 (will be 15 in August), so they definitely need their mom. My oldest is a HUGE help. They would be around 8-9 and 16-17 when I go to law school (should this plan pan out), so I am sure they can help out and the 3 of us can rally together to make this happen. I just have to keep telling myself that because it is so easy to get down on yourself, second guess your plans and end up letting that dream slip away.

  • Bevs ScooterMinionBevs ScooterMinion Alum Member
    1018 karma

    Similar boat here!

    If a group for us older, non-traditional students is started, please add/tag me. I think there was one started here on 7Sage a while back, but cannot find it at the moment. I think those peeps are done with LSAT and now attending law school.

    Admittedly, I haven't been in 7Sage for a while, and am just getting back to it.

    I second much of the sound advice given above and you're absolutely not alone, so thank you for speaking up and reaching others.
    Yes, age counts for something in the admissions process, which means we're a URM (under represented minority). Absolutely utilize that fact!
    I worry about lots all the time. I find out how to work it out, but always communicating with my kids is priority. What works for them, me, etc. We work together for everyone's benefit. I'm not saying everyone is happy all of the time, more like we take turns. That's realistic.

    I'll be 50 this year, been a paralegal for 2 decades, just finished my BA in May, have 4 kids: youngest is 15 and starting college in the Fall (I'd like to think my older, studious self helped in that respect, but he worked his butt off so he deserves all the credit), and he sings professionally so "mom taxi" is another hat I wear, as all parents do.
    Second oldest is disabled, lives at home (always will), and works---another mom taxi ride. Other 2 live in other state or country.
    In fact, I'm "disabled" too (almost completely deaf--hard to label myself disabled because I'm able, with accommodations). I make sure I get the help I need, when I need it. Do not mistake asking for assistance as weakness (not saying you do--tell others you encounter not to do so because you will encounter numbskulls who think "traditionally").

    As for motivation: my plan to attend law school within the next 2-3 years is 10 years in the making and not done yet. So I keep my eye on the end result, but also present in every moment possible. Patience is a must---I like to learn that one the hard way. lol
    Yes, I have a lot going on much of the time, but I cannot deny (I've tried) that I want to practice law some day. And I'm going to use everything in my arsenal for applying to the law school of my choice. I always suggest everyone do the same---use every bit to your advantage, even if some don't think it's an advantage, put up a fight (a sound and reasonably supported argument).

    Even if my husband will be retired when I start law school, so what? Age is just a number (the irony of that is not lost on me), it's more important that I do what I love, whenever I get there.

    My point is: do what's right for you, and step away from anyone that isn't helpful nor supportive to your goals, whomever they are (family, friends, acquaintances, work people, yadda yadda).

    If you want it, go for it. Your children will be better for it. <3

    P.S. In my spare time, I like to kick stigmas in the junk. lolz

  • AudaciousRedAudaciousRed Alum Member
    2689 karma

    @LawSkewlProbs said:
    I don't want to go through life wondering what I could've accomplished if I pursued what I really loved.

    This. So much, this. I have seen what happens when you do give up everything and wonder what would have happened. Generations of it. It's not pretty. And not just the adults suffer, either.

  • AudaciousRedAudaciousRed Alum Member
    2689 karma

    @gaflparalegal said:
    The negative comments I get from people are- what about your boys? Won't they need their mom? Where will you find the time? What about working and paying the bills? I will be honest, the slew of negativity is overwhelming at times, especially when I (we) already know we are facing an uphill battle.

    If I had $5 from every time someone asked those questions, tilted their head and asked "Really?", or said something like "Oh wow. You are SO brave to do that. I could never do that/ leave my kids/ etc", law school would probably be paid for by now.

    I can only think that if it were my husband doing this, no one would bat an eye about it. But a middle aged mom? Stop the presses. No offense to any of the dads out there, as it's the same issues we all have (leaving kids, jobs, home, etc). Have any of you men gotten this treatment? I'm really curious to know.

  • Leah M BLeah M B Alum Member
    8392 karma

    Hi all! I'm in a slightly different spot from most of you. I'm 34 but single, no kids. My challenges are a little different. I'm thankful I'll be able to move to wherever school works best for me, but not having a family means that I'll be looking to fellow law students for moral support and friends in a new place. I'm definitely intimidated about the thought of being surrounded by a bunch of whip smart 23 year olds lol. I'll be the old grandma, who doesn't really party but still wants friends! haha. I'm not quite in the disabled category, but I do have some physical limitations and I'm actually excited to be in an academic setting where it won't be a bummer that I can't go skiing on the weekends, haha. So, got that going for me.

    I do think what we have going for us is knowing ourselves and our needs much better. I know how to be more efficient, study hard but still get sleep. We'll be more disciplined than the young folks (generally speaking) which is not only attractive to professors but potential employers as well.

    I did apply last cycle and made the decision to push back a year. I applied late which ended me up denied and on wait lists more than I think I would have otherwise been. But I will say, I got a few acceptances with generous scholarships, and really didn't feel anyone looking down on me from the admissions side. There are some schools that appreciate life and work experience more than others, and I'm sure employers will be the same way. But the good news is, I'm guessing most of us here have no interest in biglaw. That's the only place where I think being older, non-traditional students could set us back. They're not going to think that we'll put in 90 hour weeks and you know... they're right. That sh*t is for the 25 year olds lol. I put in my time and worked my butt off and though I still have a work ethic, I am not interested in the world of biglaw. Hard pass haha. I have read some stories of older students finding biglaw jobs though, so if any of y'all aspire to that, it's still possible.

    Anyway, glad to "meet" you all here! :)

  • nvakhshourynvakhshoury Member
    edited July 2018 35 karma

    I'm 23, however I just stopped by to say that my mom went back to finish college with three small children. She raised us on her own, juggled multiple jobs to make ends meet and took night classes. Her perserverence that I witnessed as a little girl has always stayed with me and it continues to empower me today as I'm preparing to apply to law school. I have the utmost respect for mothers who do it all on their own and still make time to grow. I hope nothing but the best for your future and your family.

  • MelindaDeeMelindaDee Alum Member
    edited July 2018 22 karma

    Hey! I'm also old ha.
    Happy to see other oldies here. Though (like @"Leah M B") I don't have kids. It's hard enough studying and working full time and having a busy grown-up type life...I'm VERY impressed by those of you doing this and parenting at the same time.

    I've been an artist for 20 years, had a successful career and traveled the world and had lots of adventures -- and now I want to get a law degree and go be helpful to others. So thinking about immigration law, civil rights, privacy/surveillance issues.

    I don't really have big worries about how I'll do once in law school -- I'm more worried about getting into someplace I want to go. I saw some stats that older students are accepted at lower rates than younger -- even with comparable scores/GPAs. Anyone know anything about that?

    Go Team Olds!

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3674 karma

    I love this thread! 31 here with one on the way. I’m currently finding it impossible to study since my new CMO combined my job with another coworker who recently left the company. Though they gave me a small raise (only after I demanded one) the workload is insurmountable and Once Home from work all I have energy to do is crash. I’m trying not to give up on my dream of becoming a Labor an employment lawyer but it’s getting harder and harder to stay motivated. Happy to see I’m not the only one struggling here.

  • Chipster StudyChipster Study Alum Member
    888 karma

    I've got many moons on everybody in this thread, but I am happy to report that the Adcomm people that I have talked to said that if you have a compelling reason why you want to do it, then age is not really a problem. People have been pretty encouraging about my application and I am older than dirt.

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    You guys! I jsut want to hug all of you! This is the best thread! I love how all of us gals are coming together to share our stories of dreams, struggles, family, kids. Thank you for all your stories and inspiration!

    As I write this I'm getting ready to work on LG for most of the day and get some LR in. Its a rainy day here in Jersey so the kids are happy staying in watching Odd Squad. That is the balance I have to find with studying and my kiddos. Have a great weekend everyone!

  • Leah M BLeah M B Alum Member
    8392 karma

    @MelindaDee said:
    I don't really have big worries about how I'll do once in law school -- I'm more worried about getting into someplace I want to go. I saw some stats that older students are accepted at lower rates than younger -- even with comparable scores/GPAs. Anyone know anything about that?

    I applied last cycle, and I think it went pretty much to be expected for my numbers and also applying late. I got waitlisted a lot of places but I really think that’s my fault. I applied mostly end of January and into February. My biggest advice is get apps in much sooner than that! Haha. I was accepted into UCLA, WashU, and got into Cornell off the wait list. Accepted into all my safety schools. Wait listed at Michigan and Northwestern. It was a really competitive cycle and I applied late, so I think it turned out how it should have.

    I do think it’s helpful to have your PS somehow address why you’re wanting to go back to school now and why law. There may be some schools that are a little tougher on admitting older students, but I think for the most part you should be fine. Having older non-traditional students adds to the diversity of their classes. And some schools (Northwestern in particular) really prefer students to havework experience. So I wouldn’t stress too much about it!

  • MelindaDeeMelindaDee Alum Member
    22 karma

    @"Leah M B" thanks for the reply. I may have to wait till 2019 cycle -- I have so many commitments through the fall it's hard to imagine how I'll be able to get an application in before January. But first things first: 170+ or bust.

    And thanks also @"Chipster Study" -- that's v encouraging!

  • camcam Alum Member
    349 karma

    I think I'm in the older, non-traditional group. I'm 32. I just finished undergrad yesterday while working full time (military). If all goes well, I'll be attending law school at 33. I have an eight year gap in my undergraduate record after I dropped out, twice. I'm hoping that the distance between when I dropped out (with a semester of F's due to dropping after the deadline) and my final attempt at undergrad will help with my admissions chances. I don't have a family (single, no kids), so that is less of a concern to me.

    As far as will it hurt? I've read a mixed bag, but primarily positive attributes for the admission process. Older applicants typically have more work and life experience which can add to the incoming class.

    My primary age concern has to do with actually attending school. On the campus visits I have done, there has been a mixed bag of age groups. One school, it seemed like the students skewed pretty young, another it was a bit of everyone to the point where I was not sure who was a student/prospective student and who was part of the faculty.

  • Tatyana L.Tatyana L. Alum Member
    244 karma

    37 with two elementary school kids and a full time job. I definitely wish I had done this at 23 with no family. My choices are limited to a top 10 school I can’t get into to, and one that is not aba accredited. And now I have to pay for summer camp and afterschool care in addition to just law school.
    On the other hand I find myself better at self motivation. I study all the time. A break at work? Study (I so wish that 7Sage had an offline mode). Cooking dinner? Listen to 7Sage on 1.44 speed. Daily swim practices for the kids? That’s a whole timed section I can do, plus time to spare for a logic game or two.
    I told myself that I have to be able to put in the work if I am to be risk the financial well-being of my family. So I have an LSAT score floor. If I get below it, means I didn’t work hard enough, and so won’t be able to do it in law school either so I won’t bother applying. Plus a score level at which I’ll apply to the local top 10 school despite every fiber of my being screaming that I don’t have a chance.

  • cohan.mikecohan.mike Member
    edited July 2018 16 karma

    Welcome

  • samantha.ashley92samantha.ashley92 Alum Member
    1777 karma

    So I'm only 26, but still considered an "adult learner" by some schools. Some schools have specific scholarships for adult learners and have statistics for how many adult learners are in their law programs. I think anything that helps inflate their "minority" statistics will help you! Plus, you can make a great personal statement out of it. Your drive to expand your career after 9 years of paralegal work also suggests that you won't be part of the 1 in 3 students that drops out before your second year. Good luck!

  • mimimimimimimimi Member
    368 karma

    Same age, one kid, and rising 3L (at a T6). I would not have enjoyed law school this much had I done it at a younger age. So age is actually a blessing. As a single mom, you will definitely have to ask for help at times (family, friends,neighbors, etc.) and always get as much support as you can (don't feel bad about it because you can pay back later). You can do it!!

  • gkoskigkoski Legacy Member
    106 karma

    What a great thread! It's so amazing to hear that others are in a similar situation. I'm 32 with two kids, and we are finally in a place financially, where I can finally pursue law school. I think man what the heck am I thinking? Can I keep up with the younger twenty-some year olds out there? But my husband keeps saying," Give it a shot, because it's worse to not have tried and just not know what could've been."

    You can definitely do this! I've started to wake up really early to fit in at least three hours of studying, and here and there on my lunch break. Some fellow 7sagers have also reminded me that it's the quality of studying, not quantity. I signed up for Ultimate Plus, and there's so much material and not enough time with work. But focus on quality with what time you have. It's solid advice that I've gotten!!

    Keep posting :)

  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma

    @JustDoIt thanks for the tag <3

    YES! Stay true to your dreams of law school no matter what age:)

    Been around and have success stories that I will share as soon as I get my personal life in order after Hurricane Irma delayed me another cycle. I started studying at 48 and have decent scores in the higher percentiles but knew I hadn't come close to my score potential. Nothing like a bunch of trees falling on your house where thankfully no one was hurt but changes your life completely and delaying my lsat and app's another cycle. It hurts but resilience is the key <3

    One thing that is hard is balancing life obligations in respect to personal goals especially for those of us that are not "traditional" students. It can be done and so glad you are building a support system to get thru the lsat journey. Hope to add to this post soon.
    All the best:)

  • jpg_stpauljpg_stpaul Member
    7 karma

    I am older than a lot of you. I am 47 and got my BA in 1993 and plan to take the September LSAT. Most of the people in that test room probably weren't born when I finished college! I had an career in journalism, took off some years to raise kids, and decided I want a new challenge now that my boys are in middle school. I am not a single mom but my husband is out of town during the week for his job, so my plan is to attend class during the day while my sons are at school. I've been studying for months and have seen my LSAT score increase steadily, and I need a good one as my undergrad GPA is only 3.2.

    I have some of the concerns listed above, mostly that my husband and sons, who are so supportive now, are not going to like it when I am not as available to them. I already am finding ways to roll off my many volunteer jobs and have told people that this coming school year is my last one for this-and-that committee. Family and school will have to be the priorities; I am lucky that I do not need to work for pay.

  • oceanlee14oceanlee14 Legacy Member
    28 karma

    I’m a single dad for 5 yrs son. Took lsat 2 times, got in 90-100 ranked law school based on June score. But I’m retaking for 50-60 ranking

  • LawSkewlProbsLawSkewlProbs Alum Member
    103 karma

    @AudaciousRed said:

    @gaflparalegal said:
    The negative comments I get from people are- what about your boys? Won't they need their mom? Where will you find the time? What about working and paying the bills? I will be honest, the slew of negativity is overwhelming at times, especially when I (we) already know we are facing an uphill battle.

    If I had $5 from every time someone asked those questions, tilted their head and asked "Really?", or said something like "Oh wow. You are SO brave to do that. I could never do that/ leave my kids/ etc", law school would probably be paid for by now.

    I can only think that if it were my husband doing this, no one would bat an eye about it. But a middle aged mom? Stop the presses. No offense to any of the dads out there, as it's the same issues we all have (leaving kids, jobs, home, etc). Have any of you men gotten this treatment? I'm really curious to know.

    The boys will be proud that their mom is going after her goals and dreams. You'll be leading by example. You will create more opportunities for yourself and your family. Why can't people see that? You'll be in a better position going to law school than not going. You got this!!! I haven't been telling many people about my plans. Keep it to yourselves. They'll find out when you graduate. LOL

  • music_riffmusic_riff Member
    1 karma

    I'm in my 30's, no kids, but wanting to go to Law school. I for sure am a non-conventional future JD, and I'm positive that all of us will have an advantage. It will make us better law students & lawyers!

  • theLSATdreamertheLSATdreamer Alum Member
    1287 karma

    33 with a 7 month old, a full time paralegal job at a corporate law firm and still striving for law school.. lets do this !!!

  • sbc.mom_3xsbc.mom_3x Alum Member
    edited July 2018 1501 karma

    @LCMama2017 said:

    I'm not sure she is still on this board - I believe she got into her choice law school : ).

    That seriously touches my heart you guys remembered me! I did get into all the schools I applied to and I had a hard time deciding but am so happy with my decision! I’m a single mom of 3 boys, 6,3,2. I have my father as a support system for whom I’m so grateful. Best of luck, you can do it!! Just do not give up. Be patient. I tried to rush it too much but eventually realized I was lacking, severely lacking, patience! Patience and perseverance are so important. You got this! I start school in 3 weeks and am stoked. Already have reading assignments to complete before classes. :) I too was a paralegal for about 9 years!

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    So many awesome people on this post - welcome to the dads and single older folks and welcome back to @"sbc.mom_3x"! You are so inspriring and I'm so happy that you are going to your choice law school!! How exciting that in just a short time you will be starting your law school career! Sending you lots of good vibes!!

  • gaflparalegalgaflparalegal Legacy Member
    133 karma

    I love all the comments/stories. After making this post I fell off the wagon. Cancelled my account, out all my LSAT books away (out of sight). But something just won’t let me let go of the dream. So I’m back. I’m going to re-purchase a plan and get back at it. It doesn’t matter how many times we fall as long as we get back up right :-)

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @gaflparalegal good for you for coming back! I can't tell you how many times I've felt like just giving it all up but like you said - something just pulls me back in. I think its that 'something' that keeps us going. There is something about our dream that will not let us quit and we get right back on it. Managing a home, children, work and everything else that comes along with it and then to add this beast of a test is no easy task. You will need time off as you go through this journey. Just about a month ago I took a two week break because i was soooo done with anything law school related. We are all here to support each other. You have a drive and its that drive that will get you to your goal. Pls keep coming back to this board for encouragement and to ask questions. Looking forward to hearing more from you :smile: .

  • brizzle525brizzle525 Alum Member
    139 karma

    @gaflparalegal I'm glad you picked it back up! I know I've had my moments of thinking I'd be better off trying something less demanding, but something inside won't let me go. I agree with @LCMama2017 that we have to take breaks at times. But don't give up! You can do it!

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