The Brief
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The perimeter is just the distance it would take if you were to walk the outside edges of a given shape. So, for the following triangle:

the perimeter is just a + b + c.

Finding the perimeter of a square or a rectangle is similarly straightforward:

Perimeter of a Square or Rectangle: In the following diagrams, the perimeter of the square is x + x + x + x = 4x and the perimeter of the rectangle is h + b + h + b = 2(b+h).

Perimeter of a Rhombus: Since a rhombus is defined by having four sides of equal length, the perimeter of the below rhombus is just x + x + x + x = 4x.

Perimeter of a Trapezoid:

The perimeter of a trapezoid is a little trickier, but recall that we can break a trapezoid up into two right triangles and a rectangle:

And then, if we have the bases of the right triangles, we can use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the length of the diagonal bits:

Thus, we get that the perimeter is: b_1 + \sqrt{b_3^2 + h^2} + \sqrt{b_4^2 + h^2} + b_2.

Perimeter of a Parallelogram
Remember that the parallel sides of a parallelogram have the same length. Thus, for the below parallelogram:

the perimeter is just a + b + a + b = 2(a+b).

 

include some simpler problems here for finding the perimeter of when they give you basically all the right information

Sometimes, the perimeter figures in a word problem. So, for example, you might have:

Example 1

A farmer has a square field whose perimeter is twice its area. What is the area of the field?

Answer

Practice Problems

1. The outer rectangle below is 3 units apart from the smaller rectangle on the top and bottom sides, and 1 units apart on the left and right sides. The outer rectangle has a base of 8 units and a height of 12 units. What is the perimeter of the inner rectangle?

Answer

2. The perimeter of a regular 33-sided shape is 160\pi. Find the length of a side.

Answer

3. The length of a side of a regular hexagon is 6. What is the perimeter?

Answer

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Many geometry problems ask you to find the area of a shape or to compare the area of two shapes or to use the area of a shape to deduce some other value. In previous posts, we have already given the standard formulas for finding the area of such shapes (see our appendix for a full list of such formulas). But the GRE will often give you the relevant information in subtle ways, or ask you to do surprising things with the information they’ve given. So in what follows, we give some practice problems intended to help you become used to using these standard formulas in less standard ways.

But first, here are some general steps to follow in trying to solve a geometry problem:

1. Record what the problem tells you.

- The problem may give you certain lengths or angle measurements or areas or perimeters; keep track of this. It is best to write it down somewhere, either on a diagram or just in a list.

2. If you’re stuck, write down some formulas you think may be relevant.

- Thus, if the problem asks you to find the area of some shape, write down the area formula for that shape! Or if the problem gives you a 45-45-90 right triangle, write down the ratio of the side lengths. Sometimes writing such stuff down can help spark connections in your mind.

3. If you’re stuck, look back carefully at the problem and see if there’s any information you missed.

- Generally, these problems are quite parsimonious: they give you exactly what is needed to solve the problem, and no more. So if you find yourself with some unused fact, try and fit it into the problem somewhere. It’s unlikely they would’ve included something totally irrelevant to your problem.

4. If you don’t think you can get the solution quickly, just move on!

- Remember that the math section gives you 35 minutes for 20 questions, so you can only afford to spend an average of one minute and 45 seconds per question. There’s no shame in flagging a question that looks tough so that you can come back to it if time permits. Look at it this way: if you don’t get through the test, there may be easy questions down the road that you’re effectively giving up on. By flagging it and coming back later, you help ensure that you get all the low-hanging fruit in the test.

Practice Problems

1. In the following diagram, ACGF and BDHF are both squares with side lengths of 2 and area of ABEF = area of BCFG = area of CDGH. Find the area of the shaded rhombus.

Answer

2. In the following diagram, A, B, C, and D are equally spaced. How many scalene triangles can be formed with vertices at those points?

Answer

3. The following points are equally spaced. How many equilateral triangles can be formed? If three distinct points are randomly chosen, what is the likelihood that they form an equilateral triangle?

Answer

4. The outer rectangle below is 2 units apart from the smaller rectangle on the top and bottom sides, and 1 unit apart on the left and right sides. The inner rectangle has a height of 4 units and a base of 2 units. What is the area of the outer rectangle?

Answer

5. The radius of both circles below is 1. What is the area of triangle ABC?

Answer

6. What is the area of ABC?

Answer

7. In the following diagram, AD = 7. What is the area of BDC?

Answer

Challenge Problem: You are not likely to see anything as convoluted as the following on the GRE. Still, it might be a good way to push your understanding of the above material:

8. The radius of the following circle is 5. Find the shaded area.

Answer

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Here, we record all of the formulas mentioned in our guide:

General

Rule 1: Shapes and figures are not necessarily drawn to scale.

Rule 2: Shapes and figures do show the relative position of different objects.

Rule 3: Co-ordinate systems and the number line are to scale.

Polygons

Regular Polygon: Regular polygons have sides of equal length and angles of equal degree.

Angles of a Regular Polygon
If we have a regular polygon of n sides, each angle is 30(n-2) degrees.

Triangles

Triangle Area Formula: \frac{1}{2}bh

Angles of a Triangle Sum to 180: For any triangle, the sum of its interior angles is 180 degrees.

Triangle Inequality: The sum of the length of any two sides of a triangle is greater than the length of its third side.

Pythagorean Theorem: For any right triangle where a, b are the legs of the triangle and c is the hypotenuse, a^2 + b^2 = c^2.

Reverse Pythagorean Theorem: If a triangle has side lengths a, b, c such that a^2 + b^2 = c^2, then the triangle is a right triangle.

30-60-90 Right Triangle: For any right triangle with angles of 30, 60, and 90 degrees, the side lengths have the following ratio:

45-45-90 Right Triangle: Any right triangle with angles of 45, 45 and 90 degrees will have the following side lengths (where x is some fixed number):

Equilateral Triangles: All sides have the same length.

Isosceles Triangles: Two sides have the same length as each other; the third has a different length.

Equal Sides Have Equal Angles: In an isosceles triangle, the angles opposite from the sides of equal length must have equal degree.

Scalene Triangles: All of the sides are of different lengths.

Acute Triangles: All angles are less than 90 degrees.

Right Triangles: One angle is exactly 90 degrees.

Obtuse Triangles: One angle is more than 90 degrees.

Similar: Two triangles are similar if their angles have the same values.

Similar Triangles Share Proportions: If two triangles are similar, then there is some constant ratio you can multiply the sides of one triangle by in order to get the sides of the other triangle.

Congruent: Two triangles are congruent if their angles are the same and their sides are the same length.

Circles

Circle: A 2D shape whose points are always the same distance from some central point.

Center: The center of a circle is the point within the circle from which every point of the circle is the same distance. We often label the center and use it to identify the circle (e.g. “the circle whose center is at A”).

Radius: Any line from the center of a circle to any point on the circle. We often use the variable r for the length of the radius.

Area of a Circle: The area of a circle with radius r is \pi r^2.

Diameter: Any line that connects two points on the circle and the center of the circle. We often use the variable d for the length of the diameter.

Diameter Formula: For a circle with radius r, the diameter d = 2r.

Circumference: The distance around the circle.

Circumference Formula: The circumference of a circle with a radius r is 2\pi r.

Chord: Any line segment that connects two points on a circle.

Diameter is Longest Chord: The diameter of a circle is also a chord of the circle and, in fact, it is the longest chord on a circle.

Arc: Any portion of a circle’s circumference located between two points on the circle.

Sector: A portion of the circle enclosed by two radii and an arc.

Tangent: A straight line that touches a curve or circle at a single point

Point of Tangency: The point at which a tangent line touches a curve. Note that the tangent line (in red below) will be perpendicular to any line connecting the center and the point of tangency.

Inscribed: Circles can be inscribed within other shapes. An inscribed circle is the largest possible circle that can be drawn wholly within another shape. For example:

 

Circumscribed: Circles can also be drawn around other shapes. A circumscribed circle is the smallest possible circle that can be drawn wholly outside of another shape. For example:

Concentric Circles: Two circles are concentric if they share the same center.

Quadrilaterals

Rectangles: four sides connected by four 90-degree angles

Rectangle Area Formula: bh

Squares: four sides of equal length connected by four 90-degree angles.

Square Area Formula: x^2

Parallelograms: four-sided figure where opposite sides are parallel

Parallelogram Area Formula: bh

Rhombus: a parallelogram with equal sides

Rhombus Area Formula: \frac{bh}{2}

Trapezoids: four-sided figure with one pair of parallel opposing sides

Trapezoid Area Formula: \frac{(b_1 + b_2)}{2}h

Quadrilaterals Have 360 Degrees: The sum of the angles in a quadrilateral is 360.

Perimeter of a Square or Rectangle: In the following diagrams, the perimeter of the square is x + x + x + x = 4x and the perimeter of the rectangle is h + b + h + b = 2(b+h).

Perimeter of a Rhombus: Since a rhombus is defined by having four sides of equal length, the perimeter of the below rhombus is just x + x + x + x = 4x.

Perimeter of a Parallelogram
Remember that the parallel sides of a parallelogram have the same length. Thus, for the below parallelogram:

the perimeter is just a + b + a + b = 2(a+b).

Perimeter of a Trapezoid: 

The perimeter is: b_1 + \sqrt{b_3^2 + h^2} + \sqrt{b_4^2 + h^2} + b_2.

3D Shapes

Rectangular Solid: A 3D shape with six faces which are all rectangles placed perpendicularly to one another.

Volume of a Rectangular Solid: For the following rectangular solid,

its volume is equal to lwh.

Surface Area of a Rectangular Solid: For the following rectangular solid,

its surface area is equal to 2(lw + wh + lh).

Cube: a cube is a rectangular solid whose six sides are all squares.

Volume of a Cube: The volume of a cube is s^3.

Surface Area of a Cube: The surface area of a cube is 6s^2.

Circular Cylinder: A 3D shape that has a circle for both bases and a perpendicular line connecting the center of those bases.

Volume of a Circular Cylinder: The volume of a right circular cylinder with a radius of r and a height of h is \pi r^2h.

Surface Area of a Circular Cylinder: The surface area of a circular cylinder with a radius of r and a height of h is 2\pi r^2 + 2\pi r h.

Angles

Line: a straight line that continues in both directions without end.

Angle: a measure of how much you would need to turn one line to make them part of the same line

Lines Have 180 Degrees: The angle formed by a single line has 180 degrees.

Circles Have 360 Degrees: The angle formed by a circle is 360 degrees.

Parallel Lines: Parallel lines go in the same direction and therefore never intersect. We often denote that lines l_1 and l_2 are parallel by writing l_1 \parallel l_2, as in the below diagram:

Perpendicular Lines: Perpendicular lines intersect at a 90 degree angle. We denote two lines as perpendicular by writing l_1 \perp l_2:

Vertical Angles: Two angles formed by the same lines are vertical angles if they are on opposite sides of the point of intersection between the two lines.

Interior Angles:

In the above diagram,

    \[\angle 1 + \angle 3 = 180\]

    \[\angle 2 + \angle 4 = 180\]

    \[\angle 1 = \angle 4\]

    \[\angle 2 = \angle 3\]

Exterior Angles:

In the above diagram,

    \[\angle 5 + \angle 7 = 180\]

    \[\angle 6 + \angle 8 = 180\]

    \[\angle 5 = \angle 8\]

    \[\angle 6 = \angle 7\]

Corresponding Angles: Angles who are in the same relative position across parallel lines are equal to one another. For example, \angle 4 = \angle 6 in the below:

Triangles have 180 degrees: The angles of a triangle add up to 180 degrees.

Central Angle: A central angle is an angle located at the center of a circle with endpoints on the circumference of that circle

Central Angles and Arcs: In the following diagram:

The degree of angle AOB = \frac{a}{2\pi r}360

Circumference Angle Theorem: In the following circle with radius r:

The degree of angle ACB = \frac{1}{2} \frac{a}{2\pi r}360.


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Quadrilaterals are just the four-sided shapes (“quad” meaning four); they include:

Rectangles: four sides connected by four 90-degree angles

Rectangle Area Formula: bh

Squares: four sides of equal length connected by four 90-degree angles.

Square Area Formula: x^2

Parallelograms: four-sided figure where opposite sides are parallel

Parallelogram Area Formula: bh

 

Parallelograms also have the nice property that opposite angles are of the same degree, and opposite sides are the same length.

Rhombus: a parallelogram with equal sides

Rhombus Area Formula: \frac{bh}{2}

 

Trapezoids: four-sided figure with one pair of parallel opposing sides

Trapezoid Area Formula: \frac{(b_1 + b_2)}{2}h

 

Now a lot of these definitions overlap with others, so here is a diagram that explains how all of these shapes relate to one another:

Finally, one fact that is sometimes helpful in solving problems with quadrilaterals is:

Quadrilaterals Have 360 Degrees: The sum of the angles in a quadrilateral is 360.

This fact will come up again when we talk about finding the values of unknown angles.

Practice Problems:

1. Find the area of the entire figure below.

Answer

2. Find the area of the entire figure below.

Answer

3. The area of the below parallelogram is 30, BE is perpendicular to AD, and the ratio of the area of ABE to the area of ABD is 1 to 3. What is the value of d?

Answer

4. The dotted lines below meet at a right angle. Find BD.

 

Answer

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Not all triangles are equally loved. Right triangles, for example, were adored by early mathematicians, and even now, are cherished by standardized-test makers. These are the triangles that have a ninety-degree angle, like so

It is tradition to assign a to the shortest side, b to the second shortest, and c to the longest side. We also call the side opposite from the right angle (in the above diagram, c) the hypotenuse of the right triangle, and we call the other two sides the legs of the right triangle.

These figures are so well-beloved partly because they have many interesting properties. The most famous property is:

Pythagorean Theorem: If a and b are the legs of a right triangle and c is the hypotenuse of that right triangle, then

    \[a^2 + b^2 = c^2.\]

And even among the right triangles, there are two kinds that are especially cherished:

30-60-90 Right Triangle: Any right triangle with angles of 30, 60, and 90 degrees will have the following side lengths (where x is some fixed number):

45-45-90 Right Triangle: Any right triangle with angles of 45, 45 and 90 degrees will have the following side lengths (where x is some fixed number):

Knowing the ratios of the side lengths of such triangles can help (and may sometimes be crucial) to solving a geometry problem on the GRE. For example:

Example 1
Find the area of the following right triangle:

Answer

Example 2

In the following diagram, the area of triangle A is 18. Find x. Also, find the area of triangle B.

Answer

Now, for the 30-60-90 right triangle, one just has to memorize the side ratios. But you can easily derive the side ratios of the 45-45-90 right triangle:

Deriving the 45-45-90 Side Ratios

Finally, some problems may give you the side lengths of a triangle and you will have to infer that the triangle in question is actually a right triangle. In other words, we have:

Reverse Pythagorean Theorem: If a triangle has side lengths a, b, c such that a^2 + b^2 = c^2, then the triangle is a right triangle.

How is this different from the Pythagorean Theorem?

In applying the Reverse Pythagorean Theorem, here are some common side-ratios to look out for:

3-4-5

5-12-13

So if you see a triangle like:

You should note that its side lengths have the ratio 3:4:5 (simply divide all the side lengths by 3) and thus it is a right triangle.

Practice Problems

1. Find the value of \angle XYZ.

Answer

2. Find the value of \angle XYZ.

Answer

3. Find the length of AC.

Answer

4. In the following diagram, \frac{BA}{GE} = 2. What is the ratio of the area of GEC to the area of BAC?

Answer

5. What is the length of BC?

Answer

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The name “triangle” means, sensibly enough, “three angles” and indeed every triangle has three angles and three sides:

This much is hopefully familiar. But just as with circles, there are many special terms people have devised for triangles. When it comes to the sides of a triangle, we can have:

Equilateral Triangles: All sides have the same length.

Isosceles Triangles: Two sides have the same length as each other; the third has a different length.

Note that in an isosceles triangle:

Equal Sides Have Equal Angles: In an isosceles triangle, the angles opposite from the sides of equal length must have equal degree.

Thus, in the below diagram:

angles \alpha and \theta are equal.

Scalene Triangles: All of the sides are of different lengths.

We can also classify triangles according to their angles:

Acute Triangles: All angles are less than 90 degrees.

Right Triangles: One angle is exactly 90 degrees.

We use a square to mark a 90 degree angle.

Right triangles have lots of special further features which we will talk about here.

Obtuse Triangles: One angle is more than 90 degrees.

Now, we can also compare two triangles to each other. We can say that they are:

Similar: Two triangles are similar if their angles have the same values.

So in the above diagram, even though one of the triangles is obviously bigger than the other, we can say that they are “similar” (in the technical, mathematical sense defined above) because their angles have the same values. And the definition makes sense since, after all, those two triangles do look pretty similar (in our ordinary, day-to-day sense)!

These triangles are also similar to one another; it doesn’t matter if you rotate or flip the second triangle. All that matters is whether the angle values for the two figures are the same.

The reason why we care about the similarity of triangles is:

Similar Triangles Share Proportions: If two triangles are similar, then there is some constant ratio you can multiply the sides of one triangle by in order to get the sides of the other triangle.

For example, if the following two triangles are similar:

then there is some constant, call it r, such that:

    \[ar = A\]

    \[br = B\]

    \[cr = C\]

This can be very helpful in trying to find certain side lengths or the area of a triangle as we shall see.

Congruent: Two triangles are congruent if their angles are the same and their sides are the same length.

You can think of congruence as signaling that those two triangles are effectively the same triangle. The lines are the same length, the angles are the same, the area is the same, and so on.

And again, it doesn’t matter if you rotate or flip one of the triangles. It is still true that their angles and side lengths are the same, since rotating or flipping a shape won’t change any of that.

Now, when it comes to finding the area of a triangle, you need to know the base of the triangle and its height. The base can be any side of the triangle, but the height needs to extend perpendicular (at a right angle to) the base, and reach the highest point of the triangle, away from the base, like so:

Traditionally, we use b to denote the base and h to denote the height. Thus, we get:

Triangle Area Formula: \frac{1}{2}bh

Finally, we note two fundamental facts about triangles:

Angles of a Triangle Sum to 180: For any triangle, the sum of its interior angles is 180 degrees.

Triangle Inequality: The sum of the length of any two sides of a triangle is greater than the length of its third side.

Practice Problems:

1. Find the value of \theta.

Answer

 

2. Find the value of \theta.

Answer

3. A triangle has legs that are 4 and 7 units long. What integer values are possible for the third side?

Answer

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No doubt we’re all familiar with circles:

Less familiar, though, may be the many technical terms for certain parts of the circle — the kinds of terms that most people leave behind in high school. But knowing what those terms mean can help you on the GRE by giving you a vocabulary that helps you to understand the formulas and the problems (it’s easier to learn how to find the area of a circle’s sector, rather than “the bit of the circle left over when you cut off the circular bit”).

Circle: A 2D shape whose points are always the same distance from some central point.

Center: The center of a circle is the point within the circle from which every point of the circle is the same distance. We often label the center and use it to identify the circle (e.g. “the circle whose center is at A”).

Radius: Any line from the center of a circle to any point on the circle. We often use the variable r for the length of the radius.

The radius of a circle is often very important because it allows us to find the area of that circle:

Area of a Circle: The area of a circle with radius r is \pi r^2.

Diameter: Any line that connects two points on the circle and the center of the circle. We often use the variable d for the length of the diameter.

And of course, using the diameter, we can always find the radius of a circle:

Diameter Formula: For a circle with radius r, the diameter d = 2r.

Circumference: The distance around the circle.

And we can find the circumference of a circle using the diameter:

Circumference Formula: The circumference of a circle with a radius r is 2\pi r.

Thus, the area of a circle, its radius, its diameter, and its circumference are all related. Using any one of these values, we can find the other three!

Chord: Any line segment that connects two points on a circle.

Note also that:

Diameter is Longest Chord: The diameter of a circle is also a chord of the circle and, in fact, it is the longest chord on a circle.

Answer

Arc: Any portion of a circle’s circumference located between two points on the circle.

Sector: A portion of the circle enclosed by two radii and an arc

Some GRE problems will ask you to find the area of some sector of the circle. We will talk about how to handle those problems later (%TODO insert hyperlink here).

Tangent: A straight line that touches a curve or circle at a single point

Point of Tangency: The point at which a tangent line touches a curve. Note that the tangent line (in red below) will be perpendicular to any line connecting the center and the point of tangency.

Finally, circles can be drawn within or around other shapes:

Inscribed: Circles can be inscribed within other shapes. An inscribed circle is the largest possible circle that can be drawn wholly within another shape. For example:

 

Circumscribed: Circles can also be drawn around other shapes. A circumscribed circle is the smallest possible circle that can be drawn wholly outside of another shape. For example:

And circles can share a center: 

Concentric Circles: Two circles are concentric if they share the same center.

Practice Problems:

1. Draw a circle inscribed within a square

Answer

3. The radius of the below circle is 1. What is the area of the shaded region?

Answer

4. Which is longer?
AC                  BD
A. <u>AC is longer.
B. <u>BD is longer.
C. They are equally long.
D. It cannot be determined.

Answer

5. The radius of the following inscribed circle is 5, and the radius drawn connects to a point of tangency. What is the area of the shaded region?

Answer

6. The shaded region has an area of 5. What is the area of the circle?

Answer

 


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Many GRE math problems involve 2D shapes, which include triangles, squares, and in general, the kind of shapes you might remember seeing in first grade. It turns out these shapes actually have a number of interesting properties, knowledge of which matters for doing well on the GRE. These shapes are often defined by the number of sides they have. Now, there is no 2D shape that is made of just 1 line:

And similarly, there is no 2D shape with just 2 lines:

But starting with three lines, we get:

No doubt you know that this is called a triangle. With four lines we get the general category of quadrilaterals (or four-sided shapes):

This category includes trapezoids, squares, rectangles, parallelograms, and rhombuses:

(The arrows above indicate that those two lines are parallel to one another).

And we can also have a 2D shape defined by a constant distance from a central point:

and we call this a circle.

Now, of courses there are other 2D shapes; we can have pentagons (5 sides), hexagons (6 sides), and more. (A chiliagon has 1000 sides). But for the GRE, we will generally need just the above.

Finally, we also need the idea of a regular polygon.

Regular Polygon: Regular polygons have sides of equal length and angles of equal degree.

So, for example, the regular 3-sided polygon is the equilateral triangle:

which, as the name equi-lateral suggests, has three sides of equal length. And its angles are all 60 degrees.

The regular polygon for four sides is the square:

where each angle is 90 degrees.

You may have noticed a pattern here: 60 degrees for 3 sides; 90 degrees for 4 sides. And this pattern holds for any number of sides:

Angles of a Regular Polygon
If we have a regular polygon of n sides, each angle is 30(n-2) degrees.

This formula can be important when trying to find certain angle values; for example:

Example 1
You have a seven-sided regular polygon. Give the degree of an angle of the polygon.

Answer

Example 2
You have a regular octagon. What is the sum of all of the angles of the octagon?

Answer

And the fact that regular polygons have sides of equal length can help in problems involving the perimeter of a regular polygon:

Example 3
A regular 29-sided polygon has a perimeter of 116. What is the length of its sides?

Answer

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Geometry, unlike the other mathematical subjects tested on the GRE, has special rules. Basically, these rules prohibit test-takers from just eye-balling the answers based off of the diagrams. So for example, in the following problem:

Example 1
Find the value of x:

You cannot just look at the figure and guess that the mystery leg is the same length as the other leg of the triangle. For if we used the Pythagorean Theorem to calculate the solution:

Answer

So our first rule is:

Rule 1: Shapes and figures are not necessarily drawn to scale.

So in the following problem:

Example 2
Is side B longer than side A?

The correct answer is that it cannot be determined which side is longer.

However, this does not mean that the figures drawn are totally misleading. For we also have:

Rule 2: Shapes and figures do show the relative position of different objects.

What does this mean? It means that if you see something like:

Then you can conclude that the triangle is to the left of the square. Or if you see:

You can conclude that those two points are on that line, and that point a is to the left of point b.

Finally, the rules are different for co-ordinate systems and the number line:

Rule 3: Co-ordinate systems and the number line are to scale.

The main co-ordinate system you will see on the GRE is the xy-plane:

and the number line is just the following diagram:

On such systems, the objects are to scale. So if you see:

you can conclude that the value for b is twice as large as the value for a. Or if you see:

you can conclude that the area of the smaller square is 1/4 of the area of the larger square.

How do you conclude that?

So in short, remember that the proportions of shapes cannot be trusted, but the relative position of shapes can be trusted, and if there is co-ordinate system or a number line, then even the proportions can be trusted.


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This guide covers all the geometry you need for the GRE math section. We will try to make the content fairly intuitive, combining formulas with some explanation of why the formula makes sense. Doing well on geometry problems can make a big difference for your GRE math score since geometry questions make up about 15% of all GRE math questions.

Most geometry questions will ask you to do one of four things:

  1. Find the line length
    Example 1
    In the following figure, find the value of x
  2. Find the angle
    Example 2
    Find the value of \theta:
  3. Find the area (of a 2D shape) or surface area (of a 3D shape), or
    Example 3
    Find the area of the shaded region:
  4. Find the volume (of a 3D shape)
    Example 4
    Find the volume of the rectangular prism below:

But these problems can be difficult because they give you seemingly odd bits of information. For example, they might ask:

Example 5
The area of the following triangle is 20. Find c:

and you will have to figure out a way to use what you know (the area formula for triangles, the Pythagorean Theorem) to figure out the answer:

Answer

There are many little factoids which matter in geometry, and these will be found throughout our guide. Now, the sheer quantity of formulae can get overwhelming, so we will distinguish between must-know formulas like:

Pythagorean Theorem: For any right triangle where a, b are the legs of the triangle and c is the hypotenuse, a^2 + b^2 = c^2.

and the less critical formulas like:

30-60-90 Right Triangle: For any right triangle with angles of 30, 60, and 90 degrees, the side lengths have the following ratio:

The must-know formulas are, well, a must-know if you want to do well on geometry. But if you are okay with missing a few geometry questions on the exam, you can afford to ignore some of the less critical formulas. Each such formula comes up maybe once per test.


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