7Sage LSAT Blog

[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

WHEN ALL IS SAID AND DONE, THE LSAT TESTS YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF RELATIONSHIPS.

If the relationships in your life are anything like mine, then they are usually difficult, painful, and short. Of course, the LSAT is not concerned with inter-personal romantic relationships. It’s concerned with the very concept of a relationship in the most abstract way.

Let’s consider what relationships are by looking at some examples that we’re all familiar with. Consider the relationship “mother of.” That phrase describes a relationship between, say, you and your mom. Simple enough, right? Let’s try another. How about “earlier than?” Last Saturday night was “earlier than” last Sunday morning. One more? The “greater than” relationship. That’s a relationship between the numbers 10 and 7 or, to use another example, the number of “your mama” jokes possible and the number of “your mama” jokes that are appropriate for an LSAT site.
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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Let's be clear about one critical aspect of this LSAT course—and my commitment to you.

I will define terms clearly and precisely and I will use those defined terms consistently. I will also make an effort to be accurate and exact with how I use most words. If I take the effort to define a word, please understand that every time I use that word, I mean exactly what I defined and nothing else. Why am I so uptight about this?

Because it’s good for you.

Being clear, precise, and consistent with how you use your words is fundamental to having a clear, precise, and consistent mind. That’s the kind of mind that will break the LSAT.

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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

LAW SCHOOL IS EVEN HARDER.

If you didn’t already know this, now you do. If you already knew this, then you’re in better shape than most prospective law students out there. High five! If you didn’t get a high five but want a high five, just reread this paragraph until you get one.

I will often remind you that this test is hard, simply to remind you that you need to study to do well. If the idea of a hard test you might have to study for is very scary for you, you may want to rethink going to law school. One last time: The LSAT is hard. You still here? Let’s move on.

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We want to make it easy for you to find all of our free LSAT conditional logic related resources. As we add new content, we'll add it to this list. If you're looking for something in particular and don't see it here, comment on this post and we'll add it to the queue!

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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Have trouble with LSAT contrapositives? Watch this short video, then read the rest of the post.

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CONTRAPOSITIVES WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE.

Contrapositives are a life-saver on the LSAT. Often, you’ll think you got an answer choice right. “Duh, they want me to infer that ‘All business school students are greedy.’ Hmm… but I don’t see it. WHAT IS GOING ON LSAT?!” Well, that’s because the right answer choice says “If you’re not greedy, you’re not a business school student.” See, same thing! I mean that too. Contrapositives are logically equivalent statements. You can think of them as being genetic twins. They’re the same.

So which one is the contrapositive? Actually, they each are the contrapositive of the other.

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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Group 4 is made up of the following terms:

  • No
  • None
  • Not both
  • Never
  • Cannot

All the words in this group follow this translation rule:

You pick either idea, then negate that idea, then make the idea you negated the necessary condition.

Let’s try it, in six simple steps:
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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Group 3 is made up of the following terms:

  • Unless
  • Until
  • Or
  • Without

These are my favorites, because they’re notoriously confusing for students. I’m not sadistic or anything. That’s not why I like them. I like them because of how easily this apparent difficulty can be overcome by sticking to your translation mechanism.

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This game is pretty hard. It's the one about Anastasia and whether she parks in lots X, Y, or Z on Monday through Friday and how much each lot costs - $10, $12, or $15. It's from LSAT PrepTest 44, October 2004, Section 3, Questions 18-22, Logic Game 4.

Watch the video lesson below and learn how to make the key inferences that will help you solve this game.

https://7sage.com/lsat_explanations/lsat-44-section-3-game-4

For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

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[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Confused by how to negate statements on the LSAT, and not sure how to use them for contrapositives? Watch this video.

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Negation is contradiction. They mean the same thing. Remember we’re not talking about opposites (hot v. cold). We’re talking about logical negation, about contradiction (hot v. not hot). The easiest way to get the contradiction of any sentence is to tag the clause “It’s not the case that...” in front of the sentence. But, asking you to use that method, I’m appealing heavily to your intuitions on understanding what a negation is. In case your intuition isn’t very helpful, I’m going to walk you through a couple of commonly problematic types of sentences and show you how to negate them.
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This game is from LSAT PrepTest 45, December 2004, Section 3, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1. It's about sequencing Patterson's meetings with five clients - Reilly, Sanchez, Tang, Upton, and Yansky - and her workout at the gym.

Watch the video lesson below.
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