The Brief
A Blog about the LSAT, Law School and Beyond

This is a simple sequencing game about Garibaldi meeting with foreign dignitaries Fuentes, Matsuba, Rhee, Soleimani and Tbahi. It's from LSAT PrepTest 44, October 2004, Section 3, Questions 1-6, Logic Game 1.

If you want to do well on the Logic Games section of the LSAT, this game should be completed in about 5 minutes. Watch the video lesson below to see how to setup and solve this game quickly.

5s
5s
0.8x
1.0x
1.2x
1.4x
1.7x
2.0x
2.4x
3.0x

For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: starbucks-attribution-roberto-ventre

Comment on this

This logic game is about a tour group that visits five archaeological sites discovered by Ferrara, Gallagher, or Oliphant in the eighth, ninth, or tenth century. It's from LSAT PrepTest 44, October 2004, Section 3, Questions 13-17, Logic Game 3.

This game is difficult because you're being baited to confuse sufficient and necessary conditions. If you know your conditional logic well, if you can run contrapositives in your sleep, then this game is rewarding. Otherwise, this game is rough. There is also a tricky rule/premise in there that tests whether you know what "recent" means. Watch the lesson below and learn how to solve this game quickly.

5s
5s
0.8x
1.0x
1.2x
1.4x
1.7x
2.0x
2.4x
3.0x

For more Logic Games explanations like this one, hop over to our Logic Games page. There, we've recorded video explanations for every Logic Game going back over a decade. All in HD, with variable playback speed, and you get to ask questions. Oh, the best part: it's completely free.

Featured image: archaeological-site-attribution-nikon-nic

3 comments

[This is a lesson excerpt from our online course, for which we invite you to enroll.]

Thomas Edison said that genius is "1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration." Rene Descartes said "You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing." Lucretius, the Roman philosopher, said "Constant dripping hollows out a stone." The point is that hard work counts a lot. Especially when it comes to the LSAT. Yes, how well you do on the LSAT does depend on your raw intellect too, but do not discount how large a role your work ethics will play.

Continue reading

Featured image: Thomas Edison (attribution LifeSupercharger)

1 comment