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In need of encouragement

tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
in General 3679 karma

So working full time and not being able to study as much as I want is not only getting to me physically (I'm tired all the time) but emotionally - I find myself losing momentum during the week because work takes over and I'm slowly feeling like my law school dreams are impossible. I really want to go to a T14- preferably a T-7 but this process seems so impossible, sometimes I feel like giving up and just trying to get into SMU down the road (which is not a bad school just not what I envision for my journey). I'm really trying not to give up here but it's getting harder and harder :(

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Comments

  • LSATcantwinLSATcantwin Alum Member Sage
    13286 karma

    Nope, this isn’t allowed! You’ve got this. This is one of those moments you’ll look back at and say, “man, I could have given up right there and I didn’t!”.

    Don’t over do it, make sure you give yourself breaks, take time to yourself, SLEEP!

    This test isn’t going anywhere. You can take it in June, Sept or Dec and still make the next cycle. If you don’t make the next cycle? Who cares, you have more time to study and don’t have to kill yourself stressing out. No matter what path works out for you, it WILL WORK OUT!

    Don’t stop! We are here for you :)

  • JerryClarke242JerryClarke242 Alum Member
    edited January 2018 602 karma

    @tringo335 I understand how you feel. Its a long process. The foolproofing, the timed and untimed drills, the Blind Review, but you cant give up after coming this far. When I came to 7sage, I was at the very bottom of the 120 to 180 scale, now after 6 months I'm scoring in the mid to high 130's my most recent BR is 154. I am fustrated, but I am getting there! Its hard to keep studying for one test when we have so much else going on. But if you keep fighting and lean on the shoulders of the community, you are going to make it. 7sage is a community of people dedicated to beating this test. Take the time you need and rest. This test will be here and considering the amount of work I have to do to improve, I'll still be here too, haha. You welcomed me here when I made my first post and didnt have a clue how anything worked on 7sage, so even though I havent beaten this test yet, I will encourage you in anyway I can because if I can keep going, so can you :smile:

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @tringo335 said:
    So working full time and not being able to study as much as I want is not only getting to me physically (I'm tired all the time) but emotionally - I find myself losing momentum during the week because work takes over and I'm slowly feeling like my law school dreams are impossible. I really want to go to a T14- preferably a T-7 but this process seems so impossible, sometimes I feel like giving up and just trying to get into SMU down the road (which is not a bad school just not what I envision for my journey). I'm really trying not to give up here but it's getting harder and harder :(

    Girl - I so know the feeling. Its so hard to work and try to study for this crazy-ass test. Here - I need you to envision yourself in law school. Do that now. You are a 1L getting ready to go to your class. You are chit-chatting with your classmates about a tort case. You are there, you are a law student at your first pick school. See, you have made it and this process is a way to make it happen. And you will make it happen. Just keep envisioning the amazing time you will be having as a law student at your T-7 school, why? because you are already there.

    When you start to lose momentum talk to your future self. What would the future Tringo335 say to today's Tringo335? Seriously, what would she say to you? How will the future Tringo 335, Esq. encourage you to continue on this journey? She will be the one who will get you to go all the way. She will motivate you and inspire you. She will tell you that its a long process but that there is a reward at the end.

    Is T-7 possible? Ofcourse it is! You are already there. Try to enjoy the process now. That's right, I said ENJOY it. You will deliver and you will conquer. Now, go get a good-night sleep.

  • cbyrns21cbyrns21 Member
    160 karma

    @JerryClarke242 said:
    @tringo335 I understand how you feel. Its a long process. The foolproofing, the timed and untimed drills, the Blind Review, but you cant give up after coming this far. When I came to 7sage, I was at the very bottom of the 120 to 180 scale, now after 6 months I'm scoring in the mid to high 130's my most recent BR is 154. I am fustrated, but I am getting there! Its hard to keep studying for one test when we have so much else going on. But if you keep fighting and lean on the shoulders of the community, you are going to make it. 7sage is a community of people dedicated to beating this test. Take the time you need and rest. This test will be here and considering the amount of work I have to do to improve, I'll still be here too, haha. You welcomed me here when I made my first post and didnt have a clue how anything worked on 7sage, so even though I havent beaten this test yet, I will encourage you in anyway I can because if I can keep going, so can you :smile:

    @JerryClarke242 You keep striving to dominate the LSAT! I took the LSAT twice and scored in the high 130s and I hated myself. All the studying I dedicated to and sacrifices, etc and I scored this? Are you serious? I'm taking it one final time in Feb with a much different approach. I want to score in the 150s. I'm really embarrassed to have admitted this but, we're not all 170s. Our score doesn't determine our intelligence level, it is not an accurate measure of what we're academically capable of. Keep climbing the mountain! @tringo335 girl, you got this! We all have our individual hurdles but, there will be a day where when you conquer this you will beam with pride and confidence. This post will pop up three years later and some future law student will find encouragement and inspiration from this. You're not alone!

  • AlexAlex Alum Member
    23929 karma

    @tringo335 I can relate with work being draining and losing momentum. Stay consistent and don't worry about how much you get done. Small daily – seemingly insignificant – improvements will lead to major score increases over time. Just keep moving forward and do as much as you can do each day without burning out.

    Make a promise to yourself that you won't give up until you get into the T13 school of your dreams. That's what I did, and now I don't let this test or work stress me out. With the unlimited takes rule, I refuse to give up until I have the LSAT score I need and am accepted to my dream school. For me, it's really that simple. Grit & grind. Dream Big. Start small. Act now. You can do it!

  • pioneer321pioneer321 Member
    328 karma

    Studying for the LSAT while working is hard, but it's possible and you can do it! It's a completely different experience compared to when someone can dedicate all their time to it. I've done both: studied full time during a Summer break in undergrad for my first take last year, and while working full time (+ commuting for an hour each way) this year from July till December. I can definitely emphasize with you. A very important point is to try to remain consistent and put as much time as you can into it, but to not get too bummed out when something comes up and you are forced to skip a day. There is a saying in Russian that literally translates as: "You can't jump above your own head." I think it really applies here; there is only 24 hours in a day, and you can only do as much as you can do.

    Since it's physically impossible to put in as many hours per week into your prep when you also have to work, I feel like it's also important to not agonize over a specific test date. You were planning to take it in June, right? Study as much as you can given your life situation, and if your PT scores show you that you are ready by then, do it. If not, don't be afraid to push till September of December. So what if your prep ends up taking you just a bit longer? End result is worth it. Keep the goal the goal, and good luck!

  • twssmithtwssmith Alum
    5120 karma

    @tringo335

    You have been so supportive of so many people as I have read in your posts.

    All the respect for your aspirations especially given your situation working full-time!

    A little TLC goes a long way and hope you know that I have seen you be a strength for people going thru a similar burn-out phase. And that is all it is imo.. Your ability is strong but your emotional state is over-riding your mental ability.

    It can be an over-whelming experience to build the foundation to make the most of the LSAT and achieve your dreams especially adding stress focusing on the end result of admissions.

    Hang in there - Don't make studying for LSAT into a mountain - it can be parsed into a very strategic plan to optimize your improvement given your schedule. Putting too many demands on yourself is only going to lead to more burn-out. You can only do what you can in a day!

    Hope you will take a mini-break? The minute I hate LSAT is the minute I have to step away from it... Ask Josh @"Cant Get Right" when he started one of his precious few fresh PTs and literally got up from it and said I need a break! Just to let you know that being overwhelmed happens to all of us and you are not alone :)
    Tyler

  • allanisraelallanisrael Alum Member
    98 karma

    Hey @tringo335 it might look bleak, impossible a feat and dark BUT you have what it takes to ace this test. DO NOT GIVE UP! DO NOT DESPAIR! Believe you can and you will - you might need to take a break like others have suggested. just a day or two off from studying to relax and engage in a hobby you like. That might be all you need.

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    @tringo335, It's definitely not impossible. It's just a long process. We can do this by working together and continuing our studies. Stay in the game and take breaks from time to time. We're here for you.

  • Kermit750Kermit750 Alum Member
    edited January 2018 2124 karma

    One of my favorite quotes, "when life gets you down, you know what you gotta do? Just keep swimming." This exam can get overwhelming, but you've got what it takes to beat it and get into your dream school. A key thing is to celebrate small victories because sometimes we get caught up on the huge stuff without celebrating how far we've come. All this is to say now is not the time to settle because years from now your future self will be thankful for the sacrifices you made. You've got it in you! If you have to take a break do so. Like everyone has stated, the LSAT will always be here.

  • Aspiring1LAspiring1L Alum Member
    edited January 2018 159 karma

    "Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts".

  • beezmoofbeezmoof Alum Member
    555 karma

    With all the positive energy you give out to people, I know you're kind person and good will come to you with your studying. Believe in yourself because I and everyone else believes in you. There is nothing you can't do. Nothing. Rock on and don't give up.

  • Gladiator_2017Gladiator_2017 Yearly Member
    1332 karma

    You got this! I continually struggle with doubt, worry and anxiety. And when those who care for me say "you're going to do great" I'd automatically think to myself "no I won't, I'm not going to reach that score."

    But then there's grit. I think it's a great lens to look at this process through. I often wonder if I have what it takes to reach my goal score, but I sure as he'll don't doubt whether I have grit. And something tells me you have a hell of a lot of grit in you!

    Here's an article on grit that I stumbled upon yesterday:
    https://www.followthegls.com/leadership-lessons/10-habits-mentally-strong-people-travis-bradberry/

    What stood out to me most was the finding that the most successful people were terrible at imagining failure. I found the language here really powerful. When I think: crap I'm teribble at NA questions... I pause and say nope I'm terrible at imagining failure. For some reason this resonates more with me than visualizing success.

    Also, I found listening to podcasts by women for women to be really inspiring.

    1) Black Girl in Om - a podcast for and by women of color promoting wellness and self care/love.

    2) Cerebronas - Two Latinas attending Standford Law discuss navigating law school, current events, and politics.

    You are going to kill it on the LSAT. Know that you just will.
    I can't wait to meet you on the study group calls!

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    Cool--a couple podcasts I hadn't heard of before! Thanks! Podcasts can be relaxing stress relievers. Does Cerebronas talk about their LSAT studying? Maybe we could write them and ask about it if they haven't talked about it?

  • CantStopWontStopCantStopWontStop Alum Member
    1270 karma

    When are you planning to take the test? If June, push it to Sept. There’s always a way! Don’t lower your standards! GL!

  • Gladiator_2017Gladiator_2017 Yearly Member
    1332 karma

    @lsatplaylist I just finished their second episode and by skimming through it looks like they don’t have an episode dedicated to the LSAT/applications. I was thinking of reaching out to them. Maybe we can ask them to host an informal call with folks who are interested.

    Also, I love that they include a recommendation at the end of each episode that’s either a book, documentary/film, etc.

  • Sammie215Sammie215 Legacy Member
    202 karma

    Sounds like you are getting pretty burned out...
    People don't say this often on 7sage but I think it can be really helpful to give yourself permission to take a week or two off from studying. Think of it like a vacation from work-- it doesn't mean you're quitting, just that you're giving yourself time to relax and come back refreshed and more committed. I didn't study for a month after the September test, and when I took it again in December my score rose significantly. I actually think the break helped me a lot. The studying you put in doesn't immediately go away-- sometimes stepping back and allowing the concepts to sink in can be the best move!

  • westcoastbestcoastwestcoastbestcoast Alum Member
    3788 karma

    Perhaps this may not be feasible in your situation but you could consider working part time or take a couple months to dive fully into the lsat. If finances aren't an issue and you are dedicated to going to an elite law school, sacrifices may need to be made.

  • Leah M BLeah M B Alum Member
    edited January 2018 8392 karma

    @tringo335 said:
    So working full time and not being able to study as much as I want is not only getting to me physically (I'm tired all the time) but emotionally - I find myself losing momentum during the week because work takes over and I'm slowly feeling like my law school dreams are impossible. I really want to go to a T14- preferably a T-7 but this process seems so impossible, sometimes I feel like giving up and just trying to get into SMU down the road (which is not a bad school just not what I envision for my journey). I'm really trying not to give up here but it's getting harder and harder :(

    Ugh I so hear you. I work full time too and studying on top of it has been so draining at times. One of the things that helped me was someone on here started a post asking about how people working full time handle a study schedule and the majority of people said that they study a couple hours on weekday evenings. I thought I was such a slacker that all I could seem to get in was about 2 hours max before my brain was done for the night, but it turns out - that's what most people do. Especially if you have a thinking job (I'm a bookkeeper) then your brain can only do so much in a single day. I learned from that to not beat myself up as much.

    Also, I have off and on dealt with depression and as I got really deep into studying, I noticed that my emotions were getting out of whack. I think it came from spending so much of my time alone. That isolation started messing with my head. I learned that it was a requirement for me and my health to take at least 1 weekday evening off per week and spend it with friends. It was absolutely necessary to stay calibrated. Also I could study for the majority of 1 weekend day, and maybe a few hours another but also had to spend several hours connecting with people. Going to a movie together, have a couple friends over for wine and TV, whatever it takes.

    Maybe what you need is something else, but you absolutely must take time for yourself to recharge and maintain your perspective. For me, it was time connecting with my friends. Might be something else for you. But it's crucial that you not let this thing take over your whole life; you have to figure out what you need and realize that it's ok to slow down the LSAT pace in order to take care of yourself.

    You absolutely are capable of achieving what you want. It's not an unreasonable goal at all. But you need to pace yourself and do it in a healthy way so that you don't burn out. xo

  • speedwagonspeedwagon Alum Member
    393 karma

    I want to echo what other people have said about cutting yourself some slack! Working full time and doing anything can be hard, depending on your job. Working full time and having enough brain power left to do something very, very difficult? Even harder. You're great for even pushing this hard!

    I think it is good advice to let yourself take a week off or at least a few days. Explicitly. Let your brain rest, do something you enjoy, and let all this info settle in. If you're studying and in a spiral, it's going to be that much harder to absorb anything. Reflect on the things you want to do. Go to law school websites and imagine yourself there. Do something indulgent at whatever price point you can afford.

    You can do this! You absolutely can, and the fortitude it requires to do it while working is only going to serve you well as you continue. Take a deep breath and let yourself take a break. It will only help in the long run.

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    Maybe we can start a burnout/burnout prevention/recovery thread?

  • Brazil020511Brazil020511 Alum Member
    edited January 2018 429 karma

    You have a purpose in life that is greater than the adversity you are facing. Breathe, cry, be discouraged. However do not forget your end goals. Take it minute by minute. Set small goals and over time you will see your growth.

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    Wow I am completely overwhelmed and grateful to you all for your support and encouragement. Thank you so much for the positive notes and messages! I absolutely love the 7Sage community and this is one of the many reasons why.

    I will take you all's advice and keep the faith and stay in the game. I was becoming especially discouraged because my company gave us almost two weeks off over the Christmas break and I had an enormous amount of time to study full time and absolutely loved it. I was digesting so much information and really saw myself at my dream school in no time. The hubby even noticed a dramatic change in me - I was much happier and more care free. I thought I'd be able to keep it up once work started back up especially since my job isn't incredible demanding but because I am unhappy there due to the work environment, once I returned, I felt even more drained when I come home and my drive to study completely plummeted.

    Since a few people on the thread and through direct message suggested the possibility of leaving my job to study full time, I decided it would be something I'd try to consider in the future if Hubby is able to get a better paying job after he completes his master's degree and if I find the home stretch to a 170+ requires it. I also really appreciate the reminders that every little bit helps. Sometimes I feel like my little efforts at night after work are useless but that's not true. I have to believe I am still making strides even if I don't see it just yet.

    Thanks again everyone for your support! No idea what I'd do without you :)

    @LSATcantwin @JerryClarke242 @LCMama2017 @cbyrns21 @"Alex Divine" @pioneer321 @twssmith @allanisrael @lsatplaylist @Kermit750 @Aspiring1L @beezmoof @Gladiator_2017 @lsatplaylist @Feb2018Taker @Gladiator_2017 @Sammie215 @westcoastbestcoast @"Leah M B" @speedwagon @Brazil020511

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @lsatplaylist said:
    Maybe we can start a burnout/burnout prevention/recovery thread?

    I actually really like this idea - how would that play out? I wonder if anyone else would be interested.

  • LSATcantwinLSATcantwin Alum Member Sage
    13286 karma

    @lsatplaylist @tringo335

    The great @"Jonathan Wang" has a great post about burnout here;

    https://7sage.com/discussion/#/discussion/3598/burnout-and-you

    I'd be willing to talk about my experience with it as well if you'd like!

  • GuillaumeGuillaume Alum Member
    652 karma

    May not help much, but make sure you get enough sleep. I find my mood and thinking skills decrease significantly when I get less than 6 hours of sleep for more than 2-3 days. Sometimes it is better to study less with a clear mind than to put in the hours when you're spent.

  • Lizzyd_17Lizzyd_17 Legacy Member
    35 karma

    @tringo335 hey girl :) I've been hiding for a while and I typically don't comment as much. But it's always so nice to see your comments thought CC. I too get discouraged and feel that maybe lawschool isn't for me. But it's people like you that make me feel that I'm not alone and that we are all collectively going to (finally) kick some LSAT ass. Let's keep pushing ❤️

  • smartaone2smartaone2 Alum Member
    494 karma

    @"Leah M B" said:

    @tringo335 said:
    So working full time and not being able to study as much as I want is not only getting to me physically (I'm tired all the time) but emotionally - I find myself losing momentum during the week because work takes over and I'm slowly feeling like my law school dreams are impossible. I really want to go to a T14- preferably a T-7 but this process seems so impossible, sometimes I feel like giving up and just trying to get into SMU down the road (which is not a bad school just not what I envision for my journey). I'm really trying not to give up here but it's getting harder and harder :(

    Ugh I so hear you. I work full time too and studying on top of it has been so draining at times. One of the things that helped me was someone on here started a post asking about how people working full time handle a study schedule and the majority of people said that they study a couple hours on weekday evenings. I thought I was such a slacker that all I could seem to get in was about 2 hours max before my brain was done for the night, but it turns out - that's what most people do. Especially if you have a thinking job (I'm a bookkeeper) then your brain can only do so much in a single day. I learned from that to not beat myself up as much.

    Also, I have off and on dealt with depression and as I got really deep into studying, I noticed that my emotions were getting out of whack. I think it came from spending so much of my time alone. That isolation started messing with my head. I learned that it was a requirement for me and my health to take at least 1 weekday evening off per week and spend it with friends. It was absolutely necessary to stay calibrated. Also I could study for the majority of 1 weekend day, and maybe a few hours another but also had to spend several hours connecting with people. Going to a movie together, have a couple friends over for wine and TV, whatever it takes.

    Maybe what you need is something else, but you absolutely must take time for yourself to recharge and maintain your perspective. For me, it was time connecting with my friends. Might be something else for you. But it's crucial that you not let this thing take over your whole life; you have to figure out what you need and realize that it's ok to slow down the LSAT pace in order to take care of yourself.

    You absolutely are capable of achieving what you want. It's not an unreasonable goal at all. But you need to pace yourself and do it in a healthy way so that you don't burn out. xo

    AMEN goes right here! Thanks, I needed this too.:)

  • smartaone2smartaone2 Alum Member
    494 karma

    @tringo335 I totally understand as I work FT as well and have felt the same way- tired, exhausted and sometimes frustrated because I do not see me progressing they way I'd like. It is taking FOREVER to get through this CC and I have the starter package lol. But I echo all the above sentiments and advice from others. One of my favorite quotes is, "The purpose of life, is a life of purpose." You have been purposed and called for this--becoming a lawyer. Where there is "vision" there is "provision". You have the vision of being in law school (as someone stated to see yourself there) and now the provision will be provided to you. The provision of wisdom, knowledge, clarity, understanding, stamina, energy and REST is yours. You got this and you will see/experience the fruit of your labor. In the meantime, "Relax, Relate, Release" (in my Whitley voice) and Wooosah! (in my Martin Lawrence voice "Bad Boys") :) I can't wait to hear how well you CRUSHED the LSAT!

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    @smartaone2, I'm there with you in this situation--also in the CC taking a long time--and am glad to talk more.

  • SteFunny-1-1SteFunny-1-1 Monthly Member
    218 karma

    @tringo335 I completely understand where you are coming from. I also work full time and am exhausted and drained by the time I get home. I have been trying to take this exam for about 2 years now and kept putting it off because I felt i was not ready. I was not consistent with my studies and just lacked energy and motivation. This bothered me a great deal however, I learned to be more patient with myself and understand that this is a process. It may sound a little silly but I found that taking care of my physical health helped me a lot. I began to have more energy and mental clarity. You can absolutely do this! Just be patient with yourself and accepting of the fact that its a process and you will be ready when you are ready :) Trust me, ive started and stopped numerous times already, but i finally feel like I am mentally ready to remain consistent and tackle this. You have a ton of support with this great community on here! Keep grindin!

  • missmalomissmalo Alum Member
    72 karma

    You are NOT alone! I'm right there with you. Quitting is not an option. I will share a piece of encouragement from my tutor @"Daniel.Sieradzki" . He said I should celebrate the small victories, and he was right. I guarantee you that you will be able to encourage yourself when you realize how far you've come. You got this!! Just keep swimming (in my Dora voice).

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    @SVICTORIA, Totally with you on the extended timeline journey.

  • toniafisher1toniafisher1 Legacy Member
    87 karma

    One thing I would say is give yourself more time. Don’t rush it. If you really feel like law is your calling, persevere.......even if it takes years. Working and trying to study can be overwhelming. Tell yourself worst case scenario is it may take years but if it is truly your passion, it will be worth it. Hang in there.

  • btownsqueebtownsquee Alum Member
    1202 karma

    Hi!! I remember we both want to do employment law @tringo335! I'm so sorry you're feeling discouraged. I think the best antidote for feeling down and burnt out from LSAT is taking a week off (make sure to get enough sleep, get a manipedi, read a chill book). Every time I've done this, it helps A LOOOOOT and I return to the LSAT feeling encouraged and rested and my score gradually inches up.

    I'm also totally down to do a "burnout prevention"/"going through core curriculum while working full time ands staying positive" meeting. <3

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    @btownsquee, A great idea and I want to join and help if I can.

  • lTexlawzlTexlawz Member
    277 karma

    tringo335, Here is an idea. There is Texas A & M law school in downtown Fort Worth. It is tier 4 school. It is a lot easier get into than SMU. It is 4 blocks down from the AMtrak. You can still get in and they have a part time program as well. You apply there and transfer to SMU after 1 yr and have the grades to do it. You can still get in . It will put you a bit closer to SMU like 35 minute drive from I-30 in either direction. Stay off LBJ freeway is a nightmare at rush hour. Good luck your dream and don't lose faith. :-)

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @LSATcantwin said:
    @lsatplaylist @tringo335

    The great @"Jonathan Wang" has a great post about burnout here;

    https://7sage.com/discussion/#/discussion/3598/burnout-and-you

    I'd be willing to talk about my experience with it as well if you'd like!

    great read! I wonder if a thread of tips and notes from sage's who worked full time and completed the test would be helpful?

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @Guillaume said:
    May not help much, but make sure you get enough sleep. I find my mood and thinking skills decrease significantly when I get less than 6 hours of sleep for more than 2-3 days. Sometimes it is better to study less with a clear mind than to put in the hours when you're spent.

    I finally learned this late last year. I was always a 5 hour a night sleeper until one day I got 8 hours and had the best day of my life ha! I've finally adopted good sleeping habits into my routing :)

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @Lizzyd_17 said:

    @tringo335 hey girl :) I've been hiding for a while and I typically don't comment as much. But it's always so nice to see your comments thought CC. I too get discouraged and feel that maybe lawschool isn't for me. But it's people like you that make me feel that I'm not alone and that we are all collectively going to (finally) kick some LSAT ass. Let's keep pushing ❤️

    Thanks for the encouragement! I am happy I have been of help to others and that I have you all to carry me through :) Let's' kick some ASS!!!!

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @SVICTORIA said:
    @tringo335 I completely understand where you are coming from. I also work full time and am exhausted and drained by the time I get home. I have been trying to take this exam for about 2 years now and kept putting it off because I felt i was not ready. I was not consistent with my studies and just lacked energy and motivation. This bothered me a great deal however, I learned to be more patient with myself and understand that this is a process. It may sound a little silly but I found that taking care of my physical health helped me a lot. I began to have more energy and mental clarity. You can absolutely do this! Just be patient with yourself and accepting of the fact that its a process and you will be ready when you are ready :) Trust me, ive started and stopped numerous times already, but i finally feel like I am mentally ready to remain consistent and tackle this. You have a ton of support with this great community on here! Keep grindin!

    Giving myself time is something I had to learn too! This is my journey and no one else's. And as corny as it sounds, the phrase is true: 'it's about the journey not the destination'. I really feel like learning the LSAT and the process of persevering is going to make me a better law student and in turn a better lawyer.

    @missmalo said:
    I will share a piece of encouragement from my tutor @"Daniel.Sieradzki" . He said I should celebrate the small victories

    I love this!!!

    @toniafisher1 said:
    One thing I would say is give yourself more time. Don’t rush it. If you really feel like law is your calling, persevere.......even if it takes years. Working and trying to study can be overwhelming. Tell yourself worst case scenario is it may take years but if it is truly your passion, it will be worth it. Hang in there.

    Thanks Tonia!! :)

    @btownsquee said:
    Hi!! I remember we both want to do employment law @tringo335! I'm so sorry you're feeling discouraged. I think the best antidote for feeling down and burnt out from LSAT is taking a week off (make sure to get enough sleep, get a manipedi, read a chill book). Every time I've done this, it helps A LOOOOOT and I return to the LSAT feeling encouraged and rested and my score gradually inches up.

    I'm also totally down to do a "burnout prevention"/"going through core curriculum while working full time ands staying positive" meeting. <3

    My employment law homie! lol Thanks for the encouragement. I mentioned in a post above about maybe making a thread specifically of Sage's who worked full time while studying and their tips and tricks for success. What are your thoughts?

    @LSATSniper said:
    tringo335, Here is an idea. There is Texas A & M law school in downtown Fort Worth. It is tier 4 school. It is a lot easier get into than SMU. It is 4 blocks down from the AMtrak. You can still get in and they have a part time program as well. You apply there and transfer to SMU after 1 yr and have the grades to do it. You can still get in . It will put you a bit closer to SMU like 35 minute drive from I-30 in either direction. Stay off LBJ freeway is a nightmare at rush hour. Good luck your dream and don't lose faith. :-)

    My goal schools are T14 so SMU and Texas A&M are not on my radar at the moment but thanks for the tips :) I didn't realize Texas A&M had a branch in Fort Worth!

  • Seeking PerfectionSeeking Perfection Alum Member
    4423 karma

    @LSATSniper said:
    tringo335, Here is an idea. There is Texas A & M law school in downtown Fort Worth. It is tier 4 school. It is a lot easier get into than SMU. It is 4 blocks down from the AMtrak. You can still get in and they have a part time program as well. You apply there and transfer to SMU after 1 yr and have the grades to do it. You can still get in . It will put you a bit closer to SMU like 35 minute drive from I-30 in either direction. Stay off LBJ freeway is a nightmare at rush hour. Good luck your dream and don't lose faith. :-)

    @tringo335
    I see you have already responded along these lines, but don't settle. T14 or Top 7 (whatever your exact goals), I think you should either keep pressing with the LSAT until you attain your goal or unless your goals change for a different reason than the work it takes to improve. That work is the best thing about the LSAT because it separates you from the people who won't study as hard or as long either because they don't know that it works or because they don't have a powerful enough dream to keep them studying through whatever trials they face.

    Whether intentional or accidental, the LSAT is a gift to those of us with dreams. The law schools treat it like a measure of intelligence or aptitude or something fixed because US News and LSAC believe that is what it is, but at least for those who are willing to dedicate the time that is not what the LSAT is. It is a test where studying over significant periods of time can enable us to claw our way to a highly desirable application which we couldn't get if they just looked at GPA or a test that is easier to do well on.

    Good luck with your journey!

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @"Seeking Perfection" said:

    @LSATSniper said:
    tringo335, Here is an idea. There is Texas A & M law school in downtown Fort Worth. It is tier 4 school. It is a lot easier get into than SMU. It is 4 blocks down from the AMtrak. You can still get in and they have a part time program as well. You apply there and transfer to SMU after 1 yr and have the grades to do it. You can still get in . It will put you a bit closer to SMU like 35 minute drive from I-30 in either direction. Stay off LBJ freeway is a nightmare at rush hour. Good luck your dream and don't lose faith. :-)

    @tringo335
    I see you have already responded along these lines, but don't settle. T14 or Top 7 (whatever your exact goals), I think you should either keep pressing with the LSAT until you attain your goal or unless your goals change for a different reason than the work it takes to improve. That work is the best thing about the LSAT because it separates you from the people who won't study as hard or as long either because they don't know that it works or because they don't have a powerful enough dream to keep them studying through whatever trials they face.

    Whether intentional or accidental, the LSAT is a gift to those of us with dreams. The law schools treat it like a measure of intelligence or aptitude or something fixed because US News and LSAC believe that is what it is, but at least for those who are willing to dedicate the time that is not what the LSAT is. It is a test where studying over significant periods of time can enable us to claw our way to a highly desirable application which we couldn't get if they just looked at GPA or a test that is easier to do well on.

    Good luck with your journey!

    Thanks for encouraging me to hold my ground @"Seeking Perfection" :) I think @LSATSniper was confused about which schools I was aiming for lol.

    I appreciate your reminders to not settle and believe you're correct on the 'LSAT journey' it truly is a conquerable test and with the right amount of work anyone can beat it.

  • btownsqueebtownsquee Alum Member
    1202 karma

    @tringo335 @lsatplaylist

    I think a post by Sages who worked full time while studying would be helpful!

    I think I'm getting into the rhythm of it now. I've realized that I have to keep what's most important to me (family, LSAT, friends, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu) and leave out the rest at least until LSAT day.

    I don't know what would help people who work full time the most--maybe a group chat where we can keep encouraging each other? I think posts like yours where you've reached out for help are great because so many of us relate to it.

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @btownsquee said:
    @tringo335 @lsatplaylist

    I think a post by Sages who worked full time while studying would be helpful!

    I think I'm getting into the rhythm of it now. I've realized that I have to keep what's most important to me (family, LSAT, friends, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu) and leave out the rest at least until LSAT day.

    I don't know what would help people who work full time the most--maybe a group chat where we can keep encouraging each other? I think posts like yours where you've reached out for help are great because so many of us relate to it.

    That is my 2018 mantra - Family + LSAT #1 in 2018 .... also do you really practice Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? :)

  • tylerdschreur10tylerdschreur10 Alum Member
    1465 karma

    I hear you! Last summer I was working 55 hours a week, studying nights and weekends and I felt like I was going insane!

    The biggest thing that helped me was exercising/Being active. It's hard to do because it seems like time taken from studying, but it pays off tenfold! I felt better physically, was less stressed, and just happier. It doesn't have to be a serious workout, I would swim, shoot some baskets or just destroy my roommates in pingpong, whatever gets you up and out of lsat mode!

    Hope this helps!

  • btownsqueebtownsquee Alum Member
    1202 karma

    @tringo335 said:

    @btownsquee said:
    @tringo335 @lsatplaylist

    I think a post by Sages who worked full time while studying would be helpful!

    I think I'm getting into the rhythm of it now. I've realized that I have to keep what's most important to me (family, LSAT, friends, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu) and leave out the rest at least until LSAT day.

    I don't know what would help people who work full time the most--maybe a group chat where we can keep encouraging each other? I think posts like yours where you've reached out for help are great because so many of us relate to it.

    That is my 2018 mantra - Family + LSAT #1 in 2018 .... also do you really practice Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? :)

    lol yes!! And actually it was someone on this forum who said martial arts helped them with LSAT that influenced me to start. :smiley:

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @btownsquee said:

    @tringo335 said:

    @btownsquee said:
    @tringo335 @lsatplaylist

    I think a post by Sages who worked full time while studying would be helpful!

    I think I'm getting into the rhythm of it now. I've realized that I have to keep what's most important to me (family, LSAT, friends, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu) and leave out the rest at least until LSAT day.

    I don't know what would help people who work full time the most--maybe a group chat where we can keep encouraging each other? I think posts like yours where you've reached out for help are great because so many of us relate to it.

    That is my 2018 mantra - Family + LSAT #1 in 2018 .... also do you really practice Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? :)

    lol yes!! And actually it was someone on this forum who said martial arts helped them with LSAT that influenced me to start. :smiley:

    Oooo! Do tell! :-)

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @tylerdschreur10 said:
    I hear you! Last summer I was working 55 hours a week, studying nights and weekends and I felt like I was going insane!

    The biggest thing that helped me was exercising/Being active. It's hard to do because it seems like time taken from studying, but it pays off tenfold! I felt better physically, was less stressed, and just happier. It doesn't have to be a serious workout, I would swim, shoot some baskets or just destroy my roommates in pingpong, whatever gets you up and out of lsat mode!

    Hope this helps!

    Thanks! Yea I’m trying to incorporate a run a couple times a week into my routine. It is tough but it has helped!

  • zanesbitzanesbit Alum Member
    102 karma

    Listen to your body and rest when you need to. However, this is just the start of the journey. You may come to a point where you have to make some tough decisions regarding what can be sacrificed during the next 3 years. If you can take more time off from work take it...if the dishes need to sit in the sink a little longer...so be it. I absolutely empathize with you, I'm going on my 3rd take in 5 months. My first score made me question myself, the second was a huge jump, but still marginal. So, I want to to give it one more round (this cycle). Try not to box yourself in...you have forever to make this happen. 170s are hard to come by, but it's possible with hard work. This I do believe. However, don't let forums convince you that you need a 170 or even a 160 to get into a good law school...URM or no URM. There at people in top 25 and 30 schools with 155ish scores (not sure what their GPAs are, but they are in there). I don't say this to have you lower your standards, but I do encourage ypu to not beat yourself up. I personally feel that 7sage has the best curriculum out there, but that's not to say every strategy will work for everyone. There's a method to the LSAT madness, only you can figure out how your brain will make sense of it and it may not be a cookie cutter method. Keep pushing, I'm sure you've overcome harder. You can do it!

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