June Disaster - I'm Giving up, I don't know where I went wrong

edited June 29 in General 73 karma

After studying using 7sage, using the logical reasoning loophole, LSAT Bible, all that I could afford to study for this god awful test I only increased my score by 3 points from my November 2020 Test. I have spent so long studying and feel like it is all for nothing.
I was scoring on practice test on here near 165-167, I was so confident on my test. Unlike the US, Canadian schools have a harder entry standard. They won't even accept or look at a candidate under 165. I really have lost all hope and think this is enough trying and enough paying. I really thought this time around with 7sage and over a year of studying would be different. I did everything I was suppose to but still not good enough.

Trying my very best not to let this get to me, but its so hard to think that you can use all these resources and still not get there. I feel exhausted. Congrats to those that did well,. Maybe on day law school will look at only GPA and then I could have a shot.

Comments

  • 7Sage Tutors7Sage Tutors Yearly Sage
    161 karma

    Don't give up! You get more than one bite at the apple. If this is truly something you want to do, there's no reason why you can't! Personally, I took the test five times. I didn't get the score I wanted, so I kept testing and eventually got a 177. Don't let one bad score ruin your dreams.

  • Emily SloanEmily Sloan Monthly Member
    81 karma

    I have friends who have been accepted to Canadian law schools with scores much below a 165. Although this might be true for Osgoode or UofT, you can be accepted with 150's at other schools, and I even know someone accepted with a 146. Keep at it!

  • brianhhhhbrianhhhh Monthly Member
    24 karma

    Tehy won't even accept or look at a candidate under 165

    Given that only two Canadian law schools (So far as I can tell) list an average LSAT at or above 165, your claim is demonstrably false.

  • @brianhhhh said:

    Tehy won't even accept or look at a candidate under 165

    Given that only two Canadian law schools (So far as I can tell) list an average LSAT at or above 165, your claim is demonstrably false.

    While true, you can get in with some places with lower than 165, I can't afford to move across the country for school. I think if you were in my shoes you'd understand better.

    And from what I know about Canada vs. USA, schools here are steadily increasing their medians each year and unlike the USA, we have very few schools

  • cciattacciatta Monthly Member
    2 karma

    If it's possible maybe relocating to the US for school might work for you. I'm keeping my options open to schools across the US if I can't get into one in my state. I'll sacrifice and move for school. Don't give up, you never know what is in store for you.

  • mgubbay-1mgubbay-1 Monthly Member
    edited June 30 5 karma

    I am in the same boat.... I would def go to the USA for school, but it is way too expensive. Plus, we cannot get loans because we are not American citizens or permanent residents (You need an American citizen/ Permanent to guarantor the loan). Canadian banks will also not usually give money for a foreign school (unless you have a rich guarantor). The difference in tuition is upwards of 50k a year. Tuition at Canadian schools is from around 10k to 35k a year (most are under 20k). Given the exchange rate, Law school would cost more that 300k Canadian at the minimum.The only way to really make it to a US school is to: 1. Be rich/ have a rich family. 2. Get accepted to a T20 Law School that has need blind admission/ they massively reduce the tuition for stellar attributes. Unless you are some extraordinary person who overcame something extreme, won a Nobel Prize, or scored a 180 on the LSAT (mixed in with even more amazing things), it is hard to get a big enough scholarship that would make going to a US school doable for a Canadian. But! It is hard to really say if an under 165 would prevent you from going to U of T, UBC, Dal, UVIC. If you have a high average, or a reason why you did not score high (illness), you may very well still get in to a good school.

  • Matthew19941Matthew19941 Monthly Member
    edited June 30 74 karma

    Have you thought about coming to the US if finances permit it? That's a great score here obviously.

  • chrleesjchrleesj Monthly Member
    31 karma

    Hey, you got this!! I took the June LSAT too (it was my first time) and my score was 10 points lower than what I was scoring on my prep tests. It happens to the best of us, we just have to not give up!

  • Jonathan WangJonathan Wang Yearly Sage
    edited June 30 6420 karma

    As people have mentioned above, I think you're reading the statistics wrong. There are only three law schools in Canada that have a median LSAT above 165 - UBC, UofT, and UVic. Given your comment about not moving across the country and looking at 2 schools with a 165 standard, I assume you live in BC and are looking at UVic or UBC, with your only other real option in the province being up in Kamloops (TRU), which still apparently has an average of 160 or so.

    When the statistics say that 165 is the median, that means that literally half of that school's class (100+ students in each case) scored below 165. I don't know what you scored or how far away you are from that median mark (obviously, scoring a 162 as opposed to a 152 would lead to very different analysis), but I've personally worked with several students over the years that have gotten into schools like UBC, U of T, Dalhousie, and McGill under their medians. It happens all the time.

    I know it sucks to not hit your goal and I sympathize with that. Whether you choose to continue studying or not is certainly completely your choice and I'm not going to advise you from a position of ignorance what the best move is for you. I just want to make sure you understand what the statistics show and why you might not be in as dire a position as you think. If your score isn't quite median but is relatively close, you might still be competitive. Definitely feel all your feelings and don't try to ignore them, but once the emotion washes away, highly suggest evaluating again from a more analytical approach.

  • WhatslsatWhatslsat Monthly Member
    389 karma

    @"Jonathan Wang"

    This is as good an advice anyone could have asked for. I am not the person who created this post but was touched by your words of encouragements. Thanks, Jonathan.

  • smoothbrainsmoothbrain Monthly Member
    25 karma

    Don't worry! Most CAD law schools will happily accept under a 165 (I personally know of like 15+ people at Queens who scored in the 158-162 range and had GPAs in the 3.6-3.7 range when they were accepted). Not to mention, the last two acceptance cycles were particularly difficult due to COVID and inflated grades, but that trend is beginning to decline so the upcoming cycle shouldn't be as cut throat. Not to mention, McGill doesn't use LSAT as a metric of acceptance, and they focus on personal statement far more. The only schools that your comment applies to in earnest is UofT and maybe Osgoode. So if you just make sure to apply to a range, you should be accepted somewhere no problem. Focus on your statement and getting high quality references. Don't give up!!

  • Cant Get RightCant Get Right Alum Member Sage 🍌
    26291 karma

    I think @"Jonathan Wang" pretty much nailed it, so I just want to reinforce that. I don’t know you and I can’t say you can do this. Maybe you can’t. Either way, it’s okay to feel that. Take time to process it. I had a similar experience where I dropped down to part time at work in order to double down on my studies. My next official test was a point lower than my first take, and I quit too. It was absolutely awful, and I totally feel you. A couple months later, after having time to process things, I got back to work. You may do the same, or you may not. Either way it’s okay. But do think about going ahead and throwing your applications in. You may not be quite so far off as you fear. If you’re like me, though, and were relying on a killer LSAT to carry an otherwise not so impressive resume and gpa, I get it. Either way, give it time. Quit. And if law school is something you find yourself thinking about a month or two from now, you’re allowed to reconsider.

  • isdmyungisdmyung Yearly Member
    edited June 30 65 karma

    Honestly, most high scorers spend more time, money or both, than you, to achieve their dream. Youll be fine. Continue the push and youll get to where you want to go, or give up now and youll maybe think about what-if down the road.

  • 11816774461181677446 Member
    2 karma

    study after a year improved 3 points is normal................i know someone get in with 130 !

  • brianhhhhbrianhhhh Monthly Member
    24 karma

    @"theyoungsterlawyer-1-1" said:

    @brianhhhh said:

    Tehy won't even accept or look at a candidate under 165

    Given that only two Canadian law schools (So far as I can tell) list an average LSAT at or above 165, your claim is demonstrably false.

    While true, you can get in with some places with lower than 165, I can't afford to move across the country for school. I think if you were in my shoes you'd understand better.

    And from what I know about Canada vs. USA, schools here are steadily increasing their medians each year and unlike the USA, we have very few schools

    Unlike the US, Canadian schools have a harder entry standard. They won't even accept or look at a candidate under 165.

    Again, this claim is demonstrably false, as I said.

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