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Name a lawyer who inspires you...

tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
in Off-topic 3679 karma

I'll go first -

Constance Baker Motley

First African American female lawyer appointed to the federal judiciary.
Columbia Law School Grad, '46
Civil Rights activist who represented MLK
NY State Senator
All around bad-ass

Comments

  • 1000001910000019 Alum Member
    3279 karma

    Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
    His Attic style is superb.

  • ebalde1234ebalde1234 Legacy Member
    905 karma

    Elle woods counts right ? haha

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @10000019 said:
    Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
    His Attic style is superb.

    GREAT pick.

  • tringo335tringo335 Alum Member
    3679 karma

    @ebalde1234 said:
    Elle woods counts right ? haha

    If she doesn’t like what are we even doing with our lives? :-D

  • LastLSATLastLSAT Alum Member
    edited June 2018 1028 karma

    Maybe a little too cliché, but it's definitely Thurgood Marshall for me.

    I'm currently reading Devil in the Grove, and it is astounding to hear the kind of extreme personal danger and systematic adversity he had to knowingly confront every single day in his early career as an attorney for the NAACP to set the precedent for affecting the kind of change he ultimately did later with his landmark cases and as a Supreme Court Justice.

    Funny enough, I first got interested in reading more about him from LSAT RC passages haha.

  • PositivePositive Alum Member
    426 karma

    Barack Obama. No further explanation is needed : )

  • Pride Only HurtsPride Only Hurts Alum Member
    2186 karma

    Without a doubt, Charles Hamilton Houston.

  • Adam HawksAdam Hawks Alum Member
    990 karma

    David Boies. The way he dismantled Bill Gates...painful.

  • ATLsat_2019ATLsat_2019 Legacy Member
    455 karma

    Sally Yates

  • TN JediTN Jedi Legacy Member
    12 karma

    Scalia

  • jyarmojyarmo Alum Member
    350 karma

    Senator Elizabeth Warren

  • paulmv.benthempaulmv.benthem Alum Member
    1032 karma

    Dennis Edney

  • tams2018tams2018 Alum Member
    727 karma

    @jyarmo said:
    Senator Elizabeth Warren

    +1

  • cvaldez74cvaldez74 Legacy Member
    edited June 2018 130 karma

    Thurgood Marshall and Morris Dees

    ETA: even though I know they probably don't count, I love Matlock and Atticus Finch ;)

  • Gunningfor121Gunningfor121 Alum Member
    512 karma

    Antonin Scalia.

  • Gunningfor121Gunningfor121 Alum Member
    512 karma

    Also Neil Gorsuch

  • OhnoeshalpmeOhnoeshalpme Alum Member
    2531 karma

    Haven’t seen anyone say Abraham Lincoln yet. He’s at the top of my list.

  • westcoastbestcoastwestcoastbestcoast Alum Member
    3788 karma

    Harvey specter

  • JustDoItJustDoIt Alum Member
    edited June 2018 3112 karma

    Jeff Sessions. Seeing all of the garbage decisions that he is making inspires me to be a more ethical and righteous attorney. Looking at all of his mistakes makes me want to do better and be better for this country.

  • BinghamtonDaveBinghamtonDave Alum Member 🍌🍌
    edited June 2018 8673 karma

    I'm inspired by the defense attorneys (public defenders included) throughout America whose names we all might not know but who are standing between the state and the individual. I've been watching "The Staircase" and leaving aside thoughts on Mr. Peterson's guilt or innocence, the actions of the state in that case are nothing short of astonishing. Shout-out to all the defense attorneys that take on the state each and every day in America, you inspire me.

  • teamteamvicsterteamteamvicster Alum Member
    774 karma

    @BinghamtonDave said:
    I'm inspired by the defense attorneys (public defenders included) throughout America whose names we all might not know but who are standing between the state and the individual. I've been watching "The Staircase" and leaving aside thoughts on Mr. Peterson's guilt or innocence, the actions of the state in that case are nothing short of astonishing. Shout-out to all the defense attorneys that take on the state each and every day in America, you inspire me.

    YES. The staircase has been fascinating to watch. It inspires me to become a defense attorney. One of the things that I really liked was when his lawyer said it isn't innocent or guilty; it's guilty or not guilty. I am motivated to ensure a person has a fair trial, regardless of guilt.

    If you like The Staircase, you should watch The Confession Tapes. It's also on Netflix and it's about people who are coerced into giving false confessions, which unfortunately often lead to convictions. It lights a fire under my butt to defend kids and be that layer between "the system" and the individual.

  • lsatplaylistlsatplaylist Alum Member
    5244 karma

    Bryan Stevenson--Just Mercy.

  • sandypantssandypants Alum Member
    231 karma

    I <3 Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  • AudaciousRedAudaciousRed Alum Member
    2689 karma

    Inspiration: Lincoln. Self motivated, self educated, but genuinely seemed to love helping people. He supposedly had a knack for simplifying complex issues into ways people could better understand.
    Bad inspiration: Michael Cohen. If that man can become a lawyer, I sure as hell can. I'm not even in law school, and I know that I should probably double check a contract and get the client to sign it if he needs to, especially if the language mandates that he really should. Gives me hope that I can't possibly be that bad.

    I have also had some good discussions with lawyers on their views. For a while, I couldn't wrap my head around the idea of defending people who did heinous crimes, especially appeals. Why? Why would any decent person want to do that? One explained to me that he is not defending them, but he is defending the rule of law, and the rule of all applies to everyone. If we allow the rule of law to slide for the least of us, then what will it mean for the rest? And that made a lot of sense to me.

  • ML_LSAT_KillaML_LSAT_Killa Alum Member
    267 karma

    Travis Williams

  • sandypantssandypants Alum Member
    231 karma

    @AudaciousRed said:
    I have also had some good discussions with lawyers on their views. For a while, I couldn't wrap my head around the idea of defending people who did heinous crimes, especially appeals. Why? Why would any decent person want to do that? One explained to me that he is not defending them, but he is defending the rule of law, and the rule of all applies to everyone. If we allow the rule of law to slide for the least of us, then what will it mean for the rest? And that made a lot of sense to me.

    Wow amazing, I love that. That's something I have been struggling with. Thank you for sharing!!

  • niki2018niki2018 Legacy Member
    54 karma

    Shirin Ebadi; Noble peace prize winner.

  • Pride Only HurtsPride Only Hurts Alum Member
    2186 karma

    @BinghamtonDave said:
    I'm inspired by the defense attorneys (public defenders included) throughout America whose names we all might not know but who are standing between the state and the individual. I've been watching "The Staircase" and leaving aside thoughts on Mr. Peterson's guilt or innocence, the actions of the state in that case are nothing short of astonishing. Shout-out to all the defense attorneys that take on the state each and every day in America, you inspire me.

    You would love "Just Mercy" by Bryan Stevenson

  • chaynee9chaynee9 Legacy Member
    14 karma

    Real life: Ruth Ginsburg. Fiction: Atticus Finch.

  • JPJ July2021JPJ July2021 Monthly Member
    1532 karma

    Real: Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Hillary Clinton
    Fictional: Olivia Pope and Jessica Pearson

  • LCMama2017LCMama2017 Alum Member
    2134 karma

    @sandypants said:

    @AudaciousRed said:
    I have also had some good discussions with lawyers on their views. For a while, I couldn't wrap my head around the idea of defending people who did heinous crimes, especially appeals. Why? Why would any decent person want to do that? One explained to me that he is not defending them, but he is defending the rule of law, and the rule of all applies to everyone. If we allow the rule of law to slide for the least of us, then what will it mean for the rest? And that made a lot of sense to me.

    Wow amazing, I love that. That's something I have been struggling with. Thank you for sharing!!

    @AudaciousRed Agree with @sandypants - I've had a hard time understanding how people would want to be defense attorneys but I appreciate you shedding some light on why they do it. Very helpful. I always tell myself that, even for the worst of crimes, everyone is entitled to a defense (hard to swallow sometimes though!).

  • Don_DraperDon_Draper Alum Member
    88 karma

    Edward Greenberg.

  • KingTChallaKingTChalla Monthly Member
    501 karma

    Jessica Pearson

  • LSAT_WreckerLSAT_Wrecker Legacy Member
    4850 karma

    @BinghamtonDave said:
    I'm inspired by the defense attorneys (public defenders included) throughout America whose names we all might not know but who are standing between the state and the individual. I've been watching "The Staircase" and leaving aside thoughts on Mr. Peterson's guilt or innocence, the actions of the state in that case are nothing short of astonishing. Shout-out to all the defense attorneys that take on the state each and every day in America, you inspire me.

    This. For those wondering how PDs can do their job, I really recommend buying one a cup of coffee and talking to them about their job. I did it and its very enlightening about the realities of our justice system.

    plus whatever number we are at for the book "Just Mercy", Bryan Stevenson.

    I'll add Matt Murdock to the list.

  • cvaldez74cvaldez74 Legacy Member
    130 karma

    @AudaciousRed said:

    Bad inspiration: Michael Cohen. If that man can become a lawyer, I sure as hell can. I'm not even in law school, and I know that I should probably double check a contract and get the client to sign it if he needs to, especially if the language mandates that he really should. Gives me hope that I can't possibly be that bad.

    LOL! It's kind of nice going into a field already knowing that there's someone worse than you (and you haven't even started yet!). sort of gives you the freedom to relax a tiny bit. (I have the chant "There's someone worse than us! There's someone worse than us!" from an old Roseanne episode playing in my head...)

  • Daniel.SieradzkiDaniel.Sieradzki Legacy Member Sage
    2301 karma

    Phoenix Wright - The greatest defense attorney ever!

  • JerryClarke242JerryClarke242 Alum Member
    602 karma

    Yeah, definitely Matt Murdock.

  • jyarmojyarmo Alum Member
    350 karma

    @LSAT_Wrecker said:

    @BinghamtonDave said:
    I'm inspired by the defense attorneys (public defenders included) throughout America whose names we all might not know but who are standing between the state and the individual. I've been watching "The Staircase" and leaving aside thoughts on Mr. Peterson's guilt or innocence, the actions of the state in that case are nothing short of astonishing. Shout-out to all the defense attorneys that take on the state each and every day in America, you inspire me.

    This. For those wondering how PDs can do their job, I really recommend buying one a cup of coffee and talking to them about their job. I did it and its very enlightening about the realities of our justice system.

    plus whatever number we are at for the book "Just Mercy", Bryan Stevenson.

    I'll add Matt Murdock to the list.

    +1 Bryan Stevenson. He's so very inspiring. Ditto the PD conversation - I've done the same and agree it's super enlightening.

  • LSAT Warrior PrincessLSAT Warrior Princess Legacy Member
    702 karma

    @AudaciousRed said:
    Inspiration: Lincoln. Self motivated, self educated, but genuinely seemed to love helping people. He supposedly had a knack for simplifying complex issues into ways people could better understand.
    Bad inspiration: Michael Cohen. If that man can become a lawyer, I sure as hell can. I'm not even in law school, and I know that I should probably double check a contract and get the client to sign it if he needs to, especially if the language mandates that he really should. Gives me hope that I can't possibly be that bad.

    I have also had some good discussions with lawyers on their views. For a while, I couldn't wrap my head around the idea of defending people who did heinous crimes, especially appeals. Why? Why would any decent person want to do that? One explained to me that he is not defending them, but he is defending the rule of law, and the rule of all applies to everyone. If we allow the rule of law to slide for the least of us, then what will it mean for the rest? And that made a lot of sense to me.

    lol @ Michael Cohen.

  • JPJ July2021JPJ July2021 Monthly Member
    1532 karma

    @AudaciousRed He went to a school that uses library square footage in its rankings. That kind of says it all...

  • Beast ModeBeast Mode Monthly Member
    edited June 2018 809 karma

    The Notorious RBG!! She is goals!!

  • ad_coelumad_coelum Alum Member
    285 karma

    @"David Bennett" said:
    Also Neil Gorsuch

    And Judge Jeanine Pirro :) Recently went to a conference and heard her story. Amazing background!

  • jhanco10jhanco10 Alum Member
    195 karma

    Chief Justice John Roberts is a phenomenal legal mind.

  • farle072farle072 Alum Member
    17 karma

    Bill Clinton.

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